We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

"Drums in the Deep South" 1951 Video Movie Review - Civil War Flick!

Drums in the Deep South Barbara Payton 1951 Movie Review

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38,943 posts

Posted 06 January 2017 - 08:26 AM

The only time I've ever seen this movie the film quality was very poor.  That was in the 70s or so.  I remember when it was playing the drive-ins fairly frequently and that was the late 50s and early 60s.  As Barbara Payton and James Craig were unknown to me then I figured it was because of Guy Madison who we kids all knew from Wild Bill Hickock..

 

You can't say it a love triangle because there's a fourth player in the mix-the war.  Everyone is committed to their side which puts their feelings on the back burner.  Since they are in the South you can understand the impact is greater on the couple than their Northern friend who is still a soldier and has his duty to do.  That bit with the piano wire is a novel idea I've never seen in a film before. 

 

I wish the prints were better too.  It might show the movie is better than it's given credit for.    

 

I think you're right. It may explain why I had a more favorable reaction to the film than the OP (Ian), since I had viewed a restored print.

 

Interesting the film was still being shown in theaters ten years after it had been produced. It probably also had airings on late-night television.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2 wouldbestar

wouldbestar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,629 posts
  • LocationTampa, FL

Posted 05 January 2017 - 08:20 PM

The only time I've ever seen this movie the film quality was very poor.  That was in the 70s or so.  I remember when it was playing the drive-ins fairly frequently and that was the late 50s and early 60s.  As Barbara Payton and James Craig were unknown to me then I figured it was because of Guy Madison who we kids all knew from Wild Bill Hickock.

 

You can't say it's a love triangle because there's a fourth player in the mix-the war.  Everyone is committed to their side which puts their feelings on the back burner.  Since they are in the South you can understand the impact is greater on the couple than their Northern friend who is still a soldier and has his duty to do.  That bit with the piano wire is a novel idea I've never seen in a film before. 

 

I wish the prints were better too.  It might show the movie is better than it's given credit for.    


  • TopBilled likes this

#3 Randalllfed

Randalllfed

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 02 January 2017 - 12:00 PM

Do those WAB members not living in the U.S. shake their heads and wonder what all the fuss is about over a 150 year old civil war that never really exited the borders of this nation?

#4 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38,943 posts

Posted 22 November 2015 - 04:17 PM

Okay, I've had a chance to see the review--

 

Yes, I think you needed to see a restored print of this film, but you managed to form an overall impression of the film that was fairly interesting.

 

Menzies had designed the cave scenes in Selznick's adaptation of TOM SAWYER in the late 30s...and I think that helps him bring a realism to such scenes in this film. I love the part where Payton is in the cave and she is trying to help one of Craig's men. The sound design (echoes) nicely adds to the visuals.

 

This is obviously not a film about the evils of slavery and perhaps that is best left to other films where it is the main theme. However, Menzies does have a shot of slaves coming in from the cotton fields when war breaks out, which seems highly symbolic.

 

I was hoping you would have discussed the movie's final sequence, where the mountain is blown up. Without a doubt, Craig and his men meet their demise, but they are heroes for the south, causing a delay in the trains getting through to the sea. 

 

I agree that Payton is completely captivating in this motion picture. She seems like the focal point, because all the men come to the mansion and in a way her home is a sanctuary for all those caught up in the war. 

 

Personally, I don't think this is a B film. It's a very modestly budgeted independent film. And my feeling is they probably ran out of money and that's why the film just abruptly ends. I'd like to locate a copy of the original script.


  • Randalllfed likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#5 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38,943 posts

Posted 22 November 2015 - 09:15 AM

I read that since the movie went into public domain, there aren't any really good copies of it...I'm sure I would have enjoyed it a bit more if I saw an HQ version of it. The DVD I got was pretty bad...

Yes, print quality makes a huge difference in the way we perceive films. In this case, Menzies was a noted art director, so in order to appreciate what he is doing visually, it needs to be seen in the finest print quality available. The copy I watched was a restored version on Amazon Prime.

 

I promise I will watch your review today...some other things came up yesterday afternoon, so I did not get to it yet. :)


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#6 IanPatrickMovieReviews

IanPatrickMovieReviews

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts

Posted 22 November 2015 - 01:25 AM

I had a feeling you were going to call it a B film...and compared to GWTW it probably seems like one. I would say it's actually a modestly budgeted independent film (that found distribution through RKO). 

 

But I am glad you reviewed it. I will take a look at your review later today and comment more fully upon it... :)

I read that since the movie went into public domain, there aren't any really good copies of it...I'm sure I would have enjoyed it a bit more if I saw an HQ version of it. The DVD I got was pretty bad...



#7 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 38,943 posts

Posted 21 November 2015 - 03:58 PM

I had a feeling you were going to call it a B film...and compared to GWTW it probably seems like one. I would say it's actually a modestly budgeted independent film (that found distribution through RKO). 

 

But I am glad you reviewed it. I will take a look at your review later today and comment more fully upon it... :)


  • IanPatrickMovieReviews likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#8 IanPatrickMovieReviews

IanPatrickMovieReviews

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts

Posted 21 November 2015 - 03:34 PM

This is a great movie for those who love Civil War flicks. If you sympathize with the South and the Confederates, then this movie is really perfect for you! Overall, it's a decent B movie...it's difficult to compare it with a giant like "Gone with the Wind," but "Drums in the Deep South" is definitely worth watching at least once.

 

Be sure to subscribe to the channel for more reviews! I do at least three a week! A Frightening Friday Flick will be out later today!

 

 

  • TopBilled likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Drums in the Deep South, Barbara Payton, 1951, Movie Review

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users