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Top Ten Films of...


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#2521 FrankGrimes

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Posted 17 December 2015 - 01:00 AM

1935

 

1. The 39 Steps

2. Peter Ibbetson

3. Mad Love

4. The Informer

5. The Bride of Frankenstein

6. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer

7. Ruggles of Red Gap

8. Whipsaw

9. Charlie Chan in Paris

10. Sylvia Scarlett

11. The Whole Town's Talking

12. Toni

13. The Wedding Night

14. Mark of the Vampire

15. "G" Men

16. China Seas

17. Roberta

18. The Devil Is a Woman

19. Annie Oakley

20. Charlie Chan in Egypt

21. The Raven

22. Dangerous

23. Man of the Moment

24. She

25. Chandu on the Magic Island

26. Werewolf of London

27. The Murder Man

28. Les Miserables

29. Charlie Chan in Shanghai

30. Captain Blood

31. Hands Across the Table

32. The Gilded Lily

33. Barbary Coast

34. Wings in the Dark

35. Reckless

36. Steamboat Round the Bend

37. In Old Kentucky

38. Woman Wanted

39. Ah, Wilderness!

40. Break of Hearts

41. The Call of the Wild

42. Life Begins at Forty

43. The Good Fairy

44. Texas Terror

45. The Dawn Rider

46. Rendezvous

47. A Night at the Opera

48. Alice Adams

49. Top Hat

50. After Office Hours

51. If You Could Only Cook

52. A Tale of Two Cities

53. The Public Menace

54. The Mutiny on the Bounty

55. The Black Room

56. Westward Ho

57. David Copperfield

58. Doubting Thomas

59. Paradise Canyon

60. Rainbow Valley

61. Biography of a Bachelor Girl

62. Murder by Television


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#2522 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 07:44 PM

 

The Devil Is a Woman -- Dietrich's personal favorite of her films. I prefer it to Bunuel's film,

That Obscure Object of Desire, based on the same story.
 

I haven't seen Bunuel's version. But yeah, the Dietrich one is a keeper.

 

Also glad you gave a shout-out to WEREWOLF OF LONDON-- highly atmospheric, superb cast.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2523 Swithin

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 04:40 PM

1935

 

Here are my top ten, with a few comments:

 

Ah, Wilderness!  -- A joyous movie, based on Eugene O'Neill's only comedy. 

 
Bride of Frankenstein -- Brilliant, a work of art.
 
David Copperfield -- Great Dickens adaptation!
 
The Devil Is a Woman -- Dietrich's personal favorite of her films. I prefer it to Bunuel's film,
That Obscure Object of Desire, based on the same story.
 
The Mystery of Edwin Drood -- Stuart Walker made two great films in 1935, with some of the same actors. 
 
A Midsummer Night’s Dream -- Shakespeare meets Max Reinhardt. Gorgeous.
 
Mutiny on the Bounty -- Another brilliant 1935 adaptation of a novel. 
 
Peter Ibbetson -- A masterpiece of surrealism.
 
A Tale of Two Cities -- Perhaps my favorite Hollywood Dickens.
"Citizens -- Vote!," "I'm an Englishwoman, I'm your match!"
 
Werewolf of London -- My favorite of all the werewolf movies, another 1935 masterpiece by Stuart Walker. 
 
Mrs. Whack:  "Is your tripe tough, Mrs. Moncaster?"
Mrs. M:          "Not at all."
Mrs. W:          "Mine is."
Mrs M:           "It ain't tripe you're eating, it's your veil."
 
Pax vobiscum.

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#2524 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 01:39 PM

CHINA SEAS is actually the most recently viewed movie by me on this list. I know it's little more than a mostly-polished programmer, and Gable, Harlow and Beery are all playing their respective types. But I liked it. Sometimes the most routine films hit you just right way, and this was one for me.

I think that is how it was for me in the beginning, when I had first seen it. But when I stack it up against TREASURE ISLAND and the countless other films where Beery is asked (expected) to ham it up, it just seems over-baked to me. And I love all three main stars but the MGM formula is no longer fresh at this point, and they are not pushing the performers to really stretch themselves with this kind of material.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2525 LawrenceA

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 01:16 PM

I originally had THE INFORMER as an honorable mention, and it is quite good. I don't like A NIGHT AT THE OPERA as much as most people do, and I have never been able to pinpoint why. CHINA SEAS is one I used to think more highly of, but when I re-examined the film a year ago, I felt like all the leads were relying too much on stock characterizations and the script was too formulaic. Beery seems to overact more than usual, and the script almost requires him to do so, and that is why I do not entirely fault him. CAPTAIN BLOOD is enjoyable but a little too unpolished in spots. I think if it had been made a few years later when the leads were more mature, and in Technicolor, it would be more of a masterpiece.

I seem to have neglected the horror output for '35-- and I definitely like Lorre's central performance in MAD LOVE. I feel BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is overrated, though I like it. As for THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, the two leads are excellent, but I feel like the technology is not quite there yet to make the scenes believable where Robinson is talking to himself as the other character. It is obvious we have the same actor with a split screen, and it takes me out of the movie.

CHINA SEAS is actually the most recently viewed movie by me on this list. I know it's little more than a mostly-polished programmer, and Gable, Harlow and Beery are all playing their respective types. But I liked it. Sometimes the most routine films hit you just right way, and this was one for me.

#2526 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 12:46 PM

A lot here I don't know...HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE, TONI, GOIN TO TOWN, LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE, MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE...I also haven't seen that version of ANNA KARENINA. So many titles to look for.

The '35 version of ANNA KARENINA is in the TCM library so you can expect to see it sometime in the months ahead. Personally, the British version with Vivien Leigh from '48 is much better in my opinion. But see both of them, when you can.

 

HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE aired on TCM a few summers ago when Carole Lombard had a Summer Under the Stars tribute. It was the first of four she did with Fred MacMurray. She plays a manicurist, and third-billed Ralph Bellamy gets his hands done by her-- make of that what you will. LOL

 

GOIN' TO TOWN is classic Mae (as in West)...and MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE is one of W.C. Fields' best during his tenure at Paramount. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2527 LawrenceA

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 12:40 PM

For 1935 - 65 films seen
 
1.  A Night at the Opera
2.  Triumph of the Will
3.  The Informer
4.  The Bride of Frankenstein
5.  Les Miserables
6.  Mutiny on the Bounty
7.  Anna Karenina
8.  David Copperfield
9.  The 39 Steps
10. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer
 
Here are some from my runner up list: The Story of Louis Pasteur, Hands Across the Table, Goin' to Town, Ruggles of Red Gap, Mad Love, Toni, La Kermesse Heroique, G-Men and The Man on the Flying Trapeze
 
For once, I have seen all of the same films that you have listed, Lawrence.


A lot here I don't know...HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE, TONI, GOIN TO TOWN, LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE, MAN ON THE FLYING TRAPEZE...I also haven't seen that version of ANNA KARENINA. So many titles to look for.

#2528 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 12:03 PM

1935 - 69 films seen

1. BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN
2. MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY
3. CAPTAIN BLOOD
4. TOP HAT
5. THE INFORMER
6. LES MISERABLES
7. CHINA SEAS
8. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
9. A TALE OF TWO CITIES
10. THE 39 STEPS


Runner-ups: THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER, DAVID COPPERFIELD, MAD LOVE, THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, and "G" MEN.

A lot of literary adaptations this year, with a lot of costumes.

I originally had THE INFORMER as an honorable mention, and it is quite good. I don't like A NIGHT AT THE OPERA as much as most people do, and I have never been able to pinpoint why. CHINA SEAS is one I used to think more highly of, but when I re-examined the film a year ago, I felt like all the leads were relying too much on stock characterizations and the script was too formulaic. Beery seems to overact more than usual, and the script almost requires him to do so, and that is why I do not entirely fault him. CAPTAIN BLOOD is enjoyable but a little too unpolished in spots. I think if it had been made a few years later when the leads were more mature, and in Technicolor, it would be more of a masterpiece.

 

I seem to have neglected the horror output for '35-- and I definitely like Lorre's central performance in MAD LOVE. I feel BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN is overrated, though I like it. As for THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, the two leads are excellent, but I feel like the technology is not quite there yet to make the scenes believable where Robinson is talking to himself as the other character. It is obvious we have the same actor with a split screen, and it takes me out of the movie. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2529 Bogie56

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 12:00 PM

My current choices for performances for 1935 are:

 

Best Actor

 

The Marx Brothers, A Night at the Opera

 

Best Actress

 

Greta Garbo, Anna Karenina

 

Best Supporting Actor

 

Charles Laughton, Les Miserables

 

Best Supporting Actress

 

Margot Grahame, The Informer


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#2530 Bogie56

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:57 AM

For 1935 - 65 films seen

 

1.  A Night at the Opera

2.  Triumph of the Will

3.  The Informer

4.  The Bride of Frankenstein

5.  Les Miserables

6.  Mutiny on the Bounty

7.  Anna Karenina

8.  David Copperfield

9.  The 39 Steps

10. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer

 

Here are some from my runner up list: The Story of Louis Pasteur, Hands Across the Table, Goin' to Town, Ruggles of Red Gap, Mad Love, Toni, La Kermesse Heroique, G-Men and The Man on the Flying Trapeze

 

For once, I have seen all of the same films that you have listed, Lawrence.


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#2531 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:55 AM

Top, you've only got a few I don't know for these two years...CRAIG'S WIFE, THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY and HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT, ELEPHANT BOY, EVER SINCE EVE.

To be honest, EVER SINCE EVE (and SARATOGA which I also mentioned) are not great films per se, but they were the last ones of their respective stars-- Davies and Harlow-- and as such, I felt they deserved a tiny shout-out. 

 

THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY, believe it or not, is a Republic entry that was based on a short story suggested by President Roosevelt. It's actually very well made and is worth checking out.

 

https://en.wikipedia...ident's_Mystery

 

ELEPHANT BOY brought Sabu to the screen. CRAIG'S WIFE, which I have only seen aired once on TCM in the last five or six years, stars Rosalind Russell as a shrewish suburban wife. It was remade with Joan Crawford in the 50s and slightly retitled as HARRIET CRAIG. Both versions are great and would make a fine double-feature on TCM one evening. Hint-hint, programming department.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2532 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:51 AM

TopBilled, slow down! I'm trying to keep it to a year a day, so it doesn't get too congested. I appreciate your enthusiasm, but I'm just up to 1935 today.

Okay..LOL..earlier in the thread, I felt like I was behind. So I was trying to catch up. Now I'm ahead of the rest. :)


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2533 LawrenceA

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:47 AM

1935 - 69 films seen

1. BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN
2. MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY
3. CAPTAIN BLOOD
4. TOP HAT
5. THE INFORMER
6. LES MISERABLES
7. CHINA SEAS
8. A NIGHT AT THE OPERA
9. A TALE OF TWO CITIES
10. THE 39 STEPS


Runner-ups: THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER, DAVID COPPERFIELD, MAD LOVE, THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING, and "G" MEN.

A lot of literary adaptations this year, with a lot of costumes.
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#2534 LawrenceA

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:39 AM

Top, you've only got a few I don't know for these two years...CRAIG'S WIFE, THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY and HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT, ELEPHANT BOY, EVER SINCE EVE.

#2535 LawrenceA

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:35 AM

TopBilled, slow down! I'm trying to keep it to a year a day, so it doesn't get too congested. I appreciate your enthusiasm, but I'm just up to 1935 today.

#2536 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:24 AM

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-16%2Bat%2B9.04.5

 

My list:

1. SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS
2. TOPPER
3. STAGE DOOR
4. DEAD END
5. THE AWFUL TRUTH
6. THE PRINCE AND THE PAUPER
7. CONQUEST
8. HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT
9. THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA
10. MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW and THE HURRICANE (tie)

Honorable Mentions: ELEPHANT BOY; THE LAST GANGSTER; SARATOGA; EVER SINCE EVE; THEY WON'T FORGET; and WELLS FARGO. 

 

I think the best performers of 1937 were: Cary Grant; Charles Boyer; Jean Harlow; Claude Rains; Paul Muni; and Sylvia Sidney.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2537 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:08 AM

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-16%2Bat%2B9.04.1

 

My list:

1. SAN FRANCISCO
2. LIBELED LADY
3. MY MAN GODFREY
4. DODSWORTH
5. THE STORY OF LOUIS PASTEUR
6. THE GREAT ZIEGFELD
7. CAMILLE
8. MR. DEEDS GOES TO TOWN
9. REMBRANDT
10. SHOW BOAT

Honorable Mentions: THEODORA GOES WILD; THE TRAIL OF THE LONESOME PINE; CRAIG'S WIFE; COME AND GET IT; MODERN TIMES; and THE PRESIDENT'S MYSTERY

 

I think the best performers of 1936 were: Irene Dunne; William Powell; Luise Rainer; Walter Huston; and Greta Garbo.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2538 TopBilled

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Posted 16 December 2015 - 11:01 AM

I am going to post my lists for 1936 and 1937 on this thread shortly.

 

Are we planning to continue up to 2015..is that the goal?


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2539 FrankGrimes

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Posted 15 December 2015 - 08:54 PM

1934

 

1. The Thin Man

2. It Happened One Night

3. L'Atalante

4. The Mystery of Mr. X

5. The Man Who Knew Too Much

6. Spitfire

7. Liliom

8. The Lost Patrol

9. Twentieth Century

10. Charlie Chan in London

11. The Black Cat

12. Hide-Out

13. Judge Priest

14. Heat Lightning

15. Cleopatra

16. Forsaking All Others

17. Fog Over Frisco

18. Whirlpool

19. The Key

20. The Girl from Missouri

21. Lady by Choice

22. Dark Hazard

23. Gambling Lady

24. The Scarlet Pimpernel

25. The Barretts of Wimpole Street

26. Dames

27. Manhattan Melodrama

28. The Merry Widow

29. Kiss and Make-Up

30. Blue Steel

31. Waltzes from Vienna

32. The Secret Bride

33. The Gay Bride

34. David Harum

35. The World Moves On

36. Thirty Day Princess

37. Operator 13

38. Imitation of Life

39. The Gay Divorcee

40. The Lawless Frontier

41. The Lucky Texan

42. We're Not Dressing

43. Born to Be Bad

44. The Star Packer

45. Randy Rides Alone

46. 'Neath the Arizona Skies

47. West of the Divide

48. The Man from Utah

49. Murder at the Vanities

50. Evelyn Prentice

51. The Mysterious Mr. Wong

52. Riptide

53. The Trail Beyond

54. Search for Beauty

55. Woman in the Shadows

56. The Richest Girl in the World


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#2540 Jlewis

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Posted 15 December 2015 - 07:43 PM

Hopefully I am not going too far off topic here, but this is something I had posted on the other forum: http://fan.tcm.com/b...-tens-1922-1935

 

These lists are from top critics and theater owners casting their votes to FILM DAILY and are a good representative of what the "tastes" were back then (in contrast to our tastes TODAY). The numbers listed on the left are the number of votes cast.

 

***********

 

As we all know, the first Best Picture winners for the 1927-28 season (they went by “seasons” running from August to August until the 1934 ceremony fixed it to a calendar year) were Wings (as best overall production) and Sunrise (as “artistic” choice). However, what if there were Oscar ceremonies held in earlier years? What would win? Obviously OUR favorites today may not be the same as the Academy’s and general public’s back then. So… for fun... coming from my dusty Film Daily Year Book of 1936... a poll among the critics, with the number of votes for each title indicating which years had close races and which were landslide number one choices. (Initially the critics wrote in their favorites until too many were including films like The Big Parade, which were still-in-release-but-released-last-year choices. Then, in 1928, it was fixed to this-year-only choices.)

 

1922:

31 - Orphans of the Storm (United Artists)

29 - Grandma’s Boy (Pathé)

28 - Blood and Sand (Paramount)

25 - Prisoner of Zenda (Metro)

22 - When Knighthood Was in Flower (Paramount)

21 - Nanook of the North (Pathé)

20 - Smilin’ Through (First National)

19 - Tol’able David (First National)

17 - Robin Hood (United Artists)

13 - Oliver Twist (First National)

 

1923:

53 - Covered Wagon (Paramount)

26 - Merry-Go-Round (Universal)

25 - Hunchback of Notre Dame (Universal) & Robin Hood (repeat from ’22 list)

22 - Green Goddess (Goldwyn)

20 - Scaramouche (Metro)

18 - Safety Last (Pathé) & Rosita (United Artists)

17 - Down to the Sea in Ships (Hodkinson) & Little Old New York (Cosmopolitan/Goldwyn)

 

1924:

52 - Thief of Bagdad (United Artists)

51 - Sea Hawk (First National)

36 - Monsieur Beaucaire (Paramount)

35 - Beau Brummel (Warner Bros.)

33 - Secrets (First National)

32 - Marriage Circle (Warner Bros.)

30 - Abraham Lincoln (First National), Girl Shy (Pathé) & Ten Commandments (Paramount)

23 - America (United Artists)

 

1925:

63 - Gold Rush (United Artists)

60 - Unholy Three (MGM)

57 - Don Q, Son of Zorro (United Artists) & Merry Widow (Metro-Goldwyn)

55 - Last Laugh (UFA/Universal)

52 - The Freshman (Unite Artists)

38 - Phantom of the Opera (Universal)

36 - Lost World (First National)

30 - Big Parade (MGM)

29 - Kiss Me Again (Warner Bros.)

 

1926:

169 - Variety (UFA/Paramount)

114 - Ben Hur (MGM)

108 - Black Pirate (United Artists) & Big Parade (repeated from ’25)

100 - Beau Geste (Paramount)

95 - Stella Dallas (Goldwyn/United Artists)

94 - Volga Boatman (PDC)

66 - What Price Glory (Fox)

62 - Sea Beast (Warner Bros.)

49 - La Boheme (MGM)

 

1927:

235 - Beau Geste (repeated from ’26)

205 - Big Parade (repeated from ’25 & ’26)

179 - What Price Glory? (repeated from ’26)

167 - Way of All Flesh (Paramount)

164 - Ben Hur (repeated from ’26)

162 - Seventh Heaven (Fox)

146 - Chang (Paramount)

97 - Underworld (Paramount)

91 - Resurrection (United Artists)

77 – Flesh and the Devil (MGM)

 

1928:

210 - The Patriot (Paramount)

180 - Sorrell and Son (United Artists)

135 - Last Command (Paramount)

125 - Four Sons (Fox)

124 - Street Angel (Fox)

122 - The Circus (United Artists)

119 - Sunrise (Fox)

105 - The Crowd (MGM)

99 - King of Kings (Pathé)

95 - Sadie Thompson (United Artists)

 

1929:

192 - Disraeli (Warner Bros.)

161 - Broadway Melody (MGM) & Madame X (MGM)

158 - Rio Rita (RKO)

139 - Gold Diggers of Broadway (Warner Bros.)

125 - Bulldog Drummond (Goldwyn/United Artists)

121 - In Old Arizona (Fox)

113 - ****-eyed World (Fox)

110 - Last of Mrs. Cheyney (MGM)

101 - Hallelujah! (MGM)

 

1930:

271 - All Quiet on the Western Front (Universal)

167 - Abraham Lincoln (United Artists)

166 - Holiday (Pathé)

151 - Journey’s End (Tiffany)

141 - Anna Christie (MGM) & The Big House (MGM)

121 - With Byrd at the South Pole (Paramount)

94 - The Divorcee (MGM)

91 - Hell’s Angels (United Artists)

87 - Old English (Warner Bros.)

 

1931:

273 - Cimarron (RKO)

200 - Street Scene (Goldwyn/United Artists)

178 - Skippy (Paramount)

172 - Bad Girl (Fox)

164 - Min and Bill (MGM)

162 - Front Page (United Artists)

138 - Five Star Final (Warner Bros.)

128 - City Lights (United Artists)

114 - A Free Soul (MGM)

99 - Sin of Madelon Claudot (MGM)

 

1932:

296 - Grand Hotel (MGM)

214 - The Champ (MGM)

192 - Arrowsmith (Goldwyn/United Artists)

170 - The Guardsman (MGM)

168 - Smilin’ Through (MGM)

161 - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Paramount)

154 - Emma (MGM)

141 - Bill of Divorcement (RKO)

136 - Back Street (Universal)

135 - Scarface (United Artists)

 

1933:

304 - Cavalcade (Fox)

209 - 42nd Street (Warner Bros.)

187 - Private Life of Henry VIII (London/United Artists)

173 - Lady for a Day (Columbia)

169 - State Fair (Fox)

167 - A Farewell to Arms (Paramount)

158 - She Done Him Wrong (Paramount)

156 - I Am a Fugitive from the Chain Gang (Warner Bros.)

137 - Maedchen in Uniform (Deutsche Film)

128 - Rasputin and the Empress (MGM)

 

1934:

348 - The Barrets of Wimpole Street (MGM)

338 - The House of Rothschild (20th Century/United Artists)

281 - It Happened One Night (Columbia)

265 - One Night of Love (Columbia)

254 - Little Women (RKO)

249 - The Thin Man (MGM)

188 - Viva, Villa! (MGM)

172 - Dinner at Eight (MGM)

145 - The Count of Monte Cristo (United Artists)

119 - Berkeley Square (Fox)

 

1935:

339 - David Copperfield (MGM)

278 - The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (Paramount)

256 - The Informer (RKO)

250 - Naughty Marietta (MGM)

235 - Les Miserables (20th Century/UnitedArtists)

222 - Ruggles of Red Cap (Paramount)

174 - Top Hat (RKO)

166 - Broadway Melody of 1936 (MGM)

135 - Roberta (RKO)

129 - Anna Karenina (MGM)


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