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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Straight Films That Are Actually Gay.


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#1 jaragon

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 08:50 AM

"Kingsman and the Golden Circle" (2017) In the first film Eggsy (Taron Egerton) a handsome working class lad was recruited by Harry (Colin Firth) a sophisticated older gentleman who gives him a extreme make over and turns him into a secret agent ( who could moonlight as gay escort)   The movie is an over the top live action James Bond cartoon but while Bond is straight there is definite gay sensibility at play in the Kingsman series- yes there are females around but they are mostly use as decorations to distract the audience from all the brobonding.  The villain Julianne Moore is surrounded by good looking henchmen but she never has sex with them . And how straight can film be which features Elton John in a supporting role camping it up in full feather regalia as it was still 1978.  The film most obvious gay friendly asset is Channing Tatum as Agent Tequila ?! in tight cowboy drag; strutting around as if he was still in "Magic Mike" His bulging boxer briefs are photographed in loving close ups( now this a movie I wish was in 3-D)  The film ends with a heterosexual wedding but we know where the movies heart really is at when the final image is Tatum in a tight Kingsman suit.https://youtu.be/6ACG2JGk-LA


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#2 jaragon

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 03:23 PM

I always thought there was some unspoken homoerotic attraction between Vinnie ( Ken Whal) and Sonny ( Ray Sharkey) in the TV series " WiseGuy" https://youtu.be/eBuVJ2tfrlw

 


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#3 jaragon

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 05:51 PM

Seeing Willem Defoe on the Neglected Favorites thread reminded me of AUTO FOCUS (the film about actor Bob Crane of Hogan's Heroes fame).  Talking about toxic masculinity - Bob Crane's sexual obsessions pretty much tanked his career.  In the movie. Willem Defoe plays his buddy who enables his behavior and is a video taping/electronics expert.  It's sorta subtle, but I think pretty clear, that Defoe's character has the unrequited hots for Bob Crane (played by Greg Kinnear)  and this may have led to his murder when Bob tries to break up their relationship.  It's a bromance gone sour.  I really liked the film and the way it explores sexuality, celebrity in the 1960's.

 

Willem Defoe isn't a conventionally handsome guy but he is an excellent actor and he's really good in this as is Kinnear.

"Auto Focus" was an interesting movie but I would have preferred if the real killer was more of a mystery.  Crane does come across as homophobic- but his buddy Carpenter  ( Willem Defoe) seemed to be more interested in pushing the boundaries of sex- like he says in the movie when you are having an **** hands tend to wander. ;)


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#4 rayban

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 05:14 PM

Seeing Willem Defoe on the Neglected Favorites thread reminded me of AUTO FOCUS (the film about actor Bob Crane of Hogan's Heroes fame).  Talking about toxic masculinity - Bob Crane's sexual obsessions pretty much tanked his career.  In the movie. Willem Defoe plays his buddy who enables his behavior and is a video taping/electronics expert.  It's sorta subtle, but I think pretty clear, that Defoe's character has the unrequited hots for Bob Crane (played by Greg Kinnear)  and this may have led to his murder when Bob tries to break up their relationship.  It's a bromance gone sour.  I really liked the film and the way it explores sexuality, celebrity in the 1960's.

 

Willem Defoe isn't a conventionally handsome guy but he is an excellent actor and he's really good in this as is Kinnear.

Willem Defoe actually sings a whole song in "Roadhouse 66"- it is called "Maria, Maria" and he is very good, too.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#5 ChristineHoard

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 03:08 PM

Seeing Willem Defoe on the Neglected Favorites thread reminded me of AUTO FOCUS (the film about actor Bob Crane of Hogan's Heroes fame).  Talking about toxic masculinity - Bob Crane's sexual obsessions pretty much tanked his career.  In the movie. Willem Defoe plays his buddy who enables his behavior and is a video taping/electronics expert.  It's sorta subtle, but I think pretty clear, that Defoe's character has the unrequited hots for Bob Crane (played by Greg Kinnear)  and this may have led to his murder when Bob tries to break up their relationship.  It's a bromance gone sour.  I really liked the film and the way it explores sexuality, celebrity in the 1960's.

 

Willem Defoe isn't a conventionally handsome guy but he is an excellent actor and he's really good in this as is Kinnear.


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#6 jaragon

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 08:42 PM

"The Band Wagon" (1953) another great backstage musical set in the theater world with not a single gay person in sight; if we take a closer look Jeffrey Cordova ( Jack Buchanan) might be gay coded he has no real love interest except for his "personal assistant" Hal.   The metrosexual  choreographer  Paul Byrd was played by gay actor James Mitchell.   The MGM chorus boys are specially cute in this film and they are really on display in the " Louisiana Hayride" number.https://youtu.be/QVxdc1PpiQA

The guy in the bright red plaid shirt looks specially energetic ;)


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#7 ChristineHoard

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 07:40 PM

Thank you so much, Jlewis, that was just terrific.  What a couple of great scenes.  Barbara was masterful and Richard was hot without his shirt.  That little girl looked familiar - I know I've seen her in other shows.  What a treat; thanks again; I loved it!


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#8 Jlewis

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 03:43 PM

Start out with YouTube for sequences like these. Yeah, Babs is quite the passionate dame.

 

I absolutely love all of the Henry Mancini overkill of orchestra slush. Note how the melody resembles a horror/slasher flick.

 

 


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#9 ChristineHoard

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 03:17 PM

I've always wanted to see THE THORN BIRDS.  I remember Barbara won an Emmy for her performance.  Seeing Barbara plus shirtless men in the same movie is always worth my time.


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#10 Jlewis

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Posted 25 August 2017 - 10:51 AM

Have to... again... bring up THE THORN BIRDS, everybody's favorite ABC Wolper mini-series of 1983. On the surface, this is one of the great heterosexual romances of primetime TV. Two of the stars, Rachel Ward and Bryan Brown (among the few actual Australians cast) fell in love off camera and have enjoyed a long lasting marriage since. Yet there is so much to comment here, after seeing this so many times since it aired initially.

 

Of course, you have closeted star Richard Chamberlain as Father Ralph de Bricassart giving up the woman he loves for his ambitions in the Catholic church (I love God more), but still giving Meggie (Ward's character) a son, Dane. The latter is played by Philip Anglim whose wikipedia article indicates no special women in his life, but is just as nebulous as Robert Osborne's was before his passing. (In other words, it is none of our business until the actor wants it to be our business.) Later Dane drowns trying to save two girls who are more attracted to him than he is to them, being that he is trying to be a celibate priest like Daddy.

 

Most of the male stars are shirtless. Chamberlain is half naked or shirtless in major scenes with Barbra Stanwyck and Rachel Ward, both ladies I am sure felt quite safe with him. The big excuse for Ralph's avoidance of women is that he never loved his mother. Poor Stanwyck as Mary Carson so wants to bed Ralph that she is practically having the Big O just talking to him. This was her greatest performance of her last decade as a screen star.

 

Meggie's first child, Justine, is the product of her husband Luke (played by Brown, Ward's real future husband). However he spends little time with her sexually and even has a boyfriend Arnie, who warns him that he can't waste any “energy” with his wife that is required for cutting the sugar cane. It is blatantly obvious that Arnie wants Luke's “energy” all to himself. There's a hilarious scene set in the men's shower room with Luke and Arnie talking to each other buck naked and you can tell that Luke is not thinking of Meggie at all. Arnie keeps Luke occupied on the Sundays he is supposed to be spending time with his wife. After the New Years party, Arnie is waiting in the car and Meggie promises him that she won't keep Luke “too long”. As she disrobes in the bedroom, Luke moans “Megan, I... can't... stay...”

 

Later Father Ralph confronts Luke in the cane fields, pretty much confirming that Luke has created a “lavender marriage” for himself a.k.a. “you got what you wanted”. He tells him he can't “give her your love” but he might as well allow Ralph to provide financial support so she can have a “life” (after his baby was born). Meanwhile Arnie gives Ralph an "if looks could kill" expression that emphasizes which of Luke's relationships was strongest here.

 

My favorite scene of all is when Meggie, holding baby Justine, says “hello Luke” while he is in the missionary position with Arnie. They are shirtless but wearing trousers just so we don't THINK they are doing what we THINK they are doing... only Meggie doesn't have to THINK much when catching them in The Act.

 

“Cheer up, Luke. You still got your mate Arnie. Maybe you will be more use to him because you are none to me. And if I did want to have more kids, it wouldn't be hard to find a better breeder!”

 

Excuse me, I don't have the accent correct. “Breed-ah!”

 

Fast-track to 1954 (the earlier scene being 1935) when Father Ralph sees his son (not knowing he is his son) for the first time... shirtless, of course, with his sister Justine by the pool. Dane says “if it is about the stud rams...” and Ralph replies “You must be Meggie's boy.” Not to read too much into this, but it echoes an earlier scene two episodes back when Father Ralph explains sex to a much younger Meggie who says she learned a lot watching the sheep. The whole conversation is rather strange in light of Ralph being Dane's father and neither knowing at this point... and Meggie earlier telling Luke about finding a better breed-ah. Ralph being the better stud ram to produce Dane. (Oh... let's not forget that actor Richard Chamberlain is an Aries. Lol!)


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#11 jaragon

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 05:17 PM

Obviously a lot of the humor we find today was not intended in the same way back then. Frank Sinatra was to the forties what Paul McCartney was to the sixties, something to grab. The scenes with Betty Garrett's Brunhilde (what a name!) followed up on TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME (where she is also chasing him, but is less aggressive), but added the whole theme of "Frankie turns on every female... and sometimes males as well*... that they simply lose control". Sort of like A HARD DAYS NIGHT with the Fab Four running for their very lives. Yet judging how much focus Chip has on Gene Kelly's Gabey and more concern about helping him find Miss Turnstile instead of making woo in her apartment, you can't avoid the same "brotherly love" displayed earlier in ANCHORS AWEIGH.

 

It is interesting to contrast ON THE TOWN, a wartime stage musical updated to the immediate post-war period when guys were quite comfortable showing affection with each other after sharing experiences overseas, with WHITE CHRISTMAS which was filmed at the height of McCarthysim when everybody became self conscious. Both films feature the male stars dressing in drag at one point, but you sense the guys are having a LOT more fun with it in the earlier film (i.e. Jules Munshin has no problem saying "so are you" to the cop's "you're pretty cute" like Bugs Bunny would) than in Bing and Danny's "sisters" routine, where the two don't even go full drag (just a female singing record and blue feathers) and they look totally embarrassed as if this is so wrong on so many levels. (By the time SOME LIKE IT HOT got made, you can sense there was a lot that the American male of the fifties needed to get out of his "feminine side" after a decade full of suppression.)

 

I should also point out that ON THE TOWN does get pretty heavy handed in all of its heterosexuality. Take Anne Miller's attraction to rather "flamboyant" Jules Munshin and emphasizing how she loves "bear skin" and "beating on tom toms" in her "Prehistoric Man" number. I guess the message here is that it is OK to show brotherly love as long as you don't ignore the girls. However, this film is so energetic and care free while WHITE CHRISTMAS is... well, so... uptight. Even the "Prehistoric Man" song includes the line of "he just believed in free self expression".

 

*Little note: in many comedies and cartoons of the forties, there is a surprisingly live-and-let-live attitude towards gays that wasn't there in the fifties and early sixties. Take the latter. In Swooner Crooner, Porky Pig starts laying eggs like his hens to the seductive singing of Frankie and Bing "fowl". The wolf in Daffy Duck's Book Revue is clearly male and he is subdued by Frankie as well. Of course, we also see him going down into Dante's Inferno to please Pat Robertson.

You are right that films reflect the period they were made


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#12 Jlewis

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 08:48 AM

Obviously a lot of the humor we find today was not intended in the same way back then. Frank Sinatra was to the forties what Paul McCartney was to the sixties, something to grab. The scenes with Betty Garrett's Brunhilde (what a name!) followed up on TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME (where she is also chasing him, but is less aggressive), but added the whole theme of "Frankie turns on every female... and sometimes males as well*... that they simply lose control". Sort of like A HARD DAYS NIGHT with the Fab Four running for their very lives. Yet judging how much focus Chip has on Gene Kelly's Gabey and more concern about helping him find Miss Turnstile instead of making woo in her apartment, you can't avoid the same "brotherly love" displayed earlier in ANCHORS AWEIGH.

 

It is interesting to contrast ON THE TOWN, a wartime stage musical updated to the immediate post-war period when guys were quite comfortable showing affection with each other after sharing experiences overseas, with WHITE CHRISTMAS which was filmed at the height of McCarthysim when everybody became self conscious. Both films feature the male stars dressing in drag at one point, but you sense the guys are having a LOT more fun with it in the earlier film (i.e. Jules Munshin has no problem saying "so are you" to the cop's "you're pretty cute" like Bugs Bunny would) than in Bing and Danny's "sisters" routine, where the two don't even go full drag (just a female singing record and blue feathers) and they look totally embarrassed as if this is so wrong on so many levels. (By the time SOME LIKE IT HOT got made, you can sense there was a lot that the American male of the fifties needed to get out of his "feminine side" after a decade full of suppression.)

 

I should also point out that ON THE TOWN does get pretty heavy handed in all of its heterosexuality. Take Anne Miller's attraction to rather "flamboyant" Jules Munshin and emphasizing how she loves "bear skin" and "beating on tom toms" in her "Prehistoric Man" number. I guess the message here is that it is OK to show brotherly love as long as you don't ignore the girls. However, this film is so energetic and care free while WHITE CHRISTMAS is... well, so... uptight. Even the "Prehistoric Man" song includes the line of "he just believed in free self expression".

 

*Little note: in many comedies and cartoons of the forties, there is a surprisingly live-and-let-live attitude towards gays that wasn't there in the fifties and early sixties. Take the latter. In Swooner Crooner, Porky Pig starts laying eggs like his hens to the seductive singing of Frankie and Bing "fowl". The wolf in Daffy Duck's Book Revue is clearly male and he is subdued by Frankie as well. Of course, we also see him going down into Dante's Inferno to please Pat Robertson.


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#13 DougieB

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 07:17 AM

At least he was less timid than Frankie's "Chip" in ON THE TOWN.

 

That's true. Timid Danny Kaye was not. You'd think they'd have given Frank a whole other kind of buildup to launch a movie career.


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"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#14 Jlewis

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 07:06 AM

You're right. Cosmo is really kind of a third wheel. That's probably more honest than what they did with Danny Kaye in ​White Christmas​, where he's supposedly all about Vera Ellen but literally crawls away from her when they get on the window seat together. It always amazes me that any woman would look twice at a man who gives off as many mixed messages as Danny Kaye. The "freewheeling bachelor" who loves the ladies but who shies away from the altar was a niche he carved out for himself, but all I ever thought was...GUUURL PLEASE!

 

At least he was less timid than Frankie's "Chip" in ON THE TOWN.


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#15 DougieB

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 06:55 AM

In most bromances there is a woman that comes between the male duo- or they each get a girlfriend like in "White Christmas" but in "Singing in the Rain"- Cosmo does not have any female love interest.  

 

You're right. Cosmo is really kind of a third wheel. That's probably more honest than what they did with Danny Kaye in ​White Christmas​, where he's supposedly all about Vera Ellen but literally crawls away from her when they get on the window seat together. It always amazes me that any woman would look twice at a man who gives off as many mixed messages as Danny Kaye. The "freewheeling bachelor" who loves the ladies but who shies away from the altar was a niche he carved out for himself, but all I ever thought was...GUUURL, PLEASE!


"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#16 jaragon

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 05:14 PM

In most bromances there is a woman that comes between the male duo- or they each get a girlfriend like in "White Christmas" but in "Singing in the Rain"- Cosmo does not have any female love interest.  


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#17 rayban

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 10:58 AM

You find strong  echoes of this Musical Comedy tendency in "Broadway Melody of 1940" in the relationship between Fred Astaire and George Murphy.

 

The musical bromance was a real thing, wasn't it? Being part of a show biz team was a great excuse for guys to partner up, live and travel together, be in each other's company almost exclusively, etc. Seems like there were a lot of dressing room scenes of the guys getting out of their costumes and into street clothes, all very nonchalant naturally. More often than not, of course, there was a woman somehow threatening either their domestic tranquility or their "act".

.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#18 DougieB

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 07:14 AM

"Singing in the Rain" (1952) the gayest sequence in the film is the Beautiful Girl production number featuring Jimmy Thompson and that very campy narration.  Donald O'connor's character could be read as gay- he is Don's bff but doesn't seem to have any female love interest.  It's just a musical bromance.  Thompson never had another big film moment- his last IMBD credit was a crew man on "Forbidden Planet"

 

The musical bromance was a real thing, wasn't it? Being part of a show biz team was a great excuse for guys to partner up, live and travel together, be in each other's company almost exclusively, etc. Seems like there were a lot of dressing room scenes of the guys getting out of their costumes and into street clothes, all very nonchalant naturally. More often than not, of course, there was a woman somehow threatening either their domestic tranquility or their "act".


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"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#19 jaragon

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 05:45 PM

"Dunkirk" (2017) Nolan's intense war epic is a must on the big screen and what's gay about it ?

Like all manly movies with an all male cast ( the women barely nod) there is some level of **** eroticism- in this case most the cast is made up of cute Euro lads including Boy Band cutie Harry Styles.   Two of the lads have a very intense silent devotion to each other that I expected them to be making out by fade out.https://youtu.be/ZachrFrpOIU


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#20 jaragon

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 07:09 AM

"Singing in the Rain" (1952) the gayest sequence in the film is the Beautiful Girl production number featuring Jimmy Thompson and that very campy narration.  Donald O'connor's character could be read as gay- he is Don's bff but doesn't seem to have any female love interest.  It's just a musical bromance.  Thompson never had another big film moment- his last IMBD credit was a crew man on "Forbidden Planet"


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