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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Straight Films That Are Actually Gay.


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#41 jaragon

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 11:16 AM

Howard Hawk's "The Big Sky" (1952)  what's going on between Kirk and Dewey?  And Dewey looks very nice in those leather pants.... ;) https://youtu.be/ZmrOi3n98nM


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#42 jaragon

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 06:11 PM

"It's Always Fair Weather" (1955) a very dark for MGM musical about a trio of bromantic  soldiers.

Gene Kelly, Dan Daily and Michael Kidd who were great friends during the war they celebrate their return home by getting drunk and performing a exuberant manly dance. The choreography seems to suggest they have another type of male bonding on their minds.  They don't have sex instead pledge to honor their undying friendship and get together in ten years.   Reality soon hits the fan and their dreams get down graded- Kelly becomes a gambler, Daily gives up his art career and settles for a safe corporate job and loveless childless marriage. Kidd just opens a burger joint and has lots of children.   The ten year reunion is a disaster the men have nothing in common. Cyd Charisse tricks the men into appearing in a tv show called "Midnight with Madeline"  Dolores  Gray plays the host who acts  like a drag queen.  The reunion seems to have the greatest effect of the gay coded Daily- his wive wants a divorce ( gee I wonder why?!) and in amazing drunk/break down number which includes a bit of comic cross dressing- he realizes that he is living a lie.  He shaves off his mustache ( to please his buddies) and after another manly fight production number the bromance is saved.  But in the forced happy ending everyone must go on their heterosexual safe path- Kidd goes back to the family (well at least he seem to be enjoying a healthy sex life) Kelly and Charisse end up together( but seriously I don't see this lasting more than a couple of weeks) and Daily's wife wants him back perhaps all that manly fighting got her interested in finally having children. In a more realistic ending Daily would have gotten a divorce, moves to the West Village and started painting young models who reminded him of Gene....but instead we get the all is safe with the world  ending but I have a feeling the creators were not buying either- the final shot a very phony ( even for it's day) matte painting of Manhattan makes it clear there are stormy clouds ahead.


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#43 jaragon

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 05:30 PM

"The Possession of Joel Delaney" (1972) is this scary horror movie Shirley MacLaine must confront supernatural evil when her brother (Perry King) is possessed by the homicidal spirit.  King, looks very pretty and even though he seems to have a girlfriend - he seems gay coded.  King had an intense relationship with a young Puerto Rican man which is never really explain unless they were lovers. The gay angles adds another level to the film's premise in which rich white MacLaine must venture into El Barrio in order to help save King.  In the films disturbing climax which takes place on a beach house in Fire Island (!?) King tortures MacLaine and her children. He makes his nephew strip and dance naked on a table (!?) a still shocking image.


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#44 Jlewis

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 12:29 PM

Gee. I am shocked! Considering the food shortage on the ship (and a reason they are feisty), those soldiers look rather healthy and bulky-hulky.


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#45 jaragon

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 12:00 PM

There is a YouTube video called "Gay shots in Battleship Potemkin". However, it looks like the creator added some addition footage shot silent and black and white that I don't recall seeing in the original 1925 version. (No, don't post that one here, even though it is tame enough for you to use your imagination. Ha ha!) 

 

I always chuckled over how the guys in All Quiet On The Western Front (1930) are shown having fun bathing together in the river until the French girls show up and they suddenly realize "oh this is what we are supposed to do... go after them". (Speaking of soldiers at bath time. Mel Gibson has never been gay friendly with some of his controversial remarks, but he has a lot to answer for in Gallipoli.)

The gay shots in " Battleship Potemkin" are obviously fake- one of the actual sailors from the real film looks looks like Chaning Tatum Sergei Esenstein was gay so who knows what was kept out the real movie


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#46 Jlewis

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 06:27 PM

There is a YouTube video called "Gay shots in Battleship Potemkin". However, it looks like the creator added some addition footage shot silent and black and white that I don't recall seeing in the original 1925 version. (No, don't post that one here, even though it is tame enough for you to use your imagination. Ha ha!) 

 

I always chuckled over how the guys in All Quiet On The Western Front (1930) are shown having fun bathing together in the river until the French girls show up and they suddenly realize "oh this is what we are supposed to do... go after them". (Speaking of soldiers at bath time. Mel Gibson has never been gay friendly with some of his controversial remarks, but he has a lot to answer for in Gallipoli.)


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#47 jaragon

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 05:47 PM

Yeah I saw your earlier comment. Especially the remora taken from a shark as a display of bro-buddy affection. Priceless! Also the dachshund is  getting a lot of attention as well.

Seriously I love to re edit that video add some sexy music and turn it into a gay coming attraction trailer-  " Under the Ocean anything is possible...even man love"
 


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#48 Jlewis

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:18 PM

Yeah I saw your earlier comment. Especially the remora taken from a shark as a display of bro-buddy affection. Priceless! Also the dachshund is  getting a lot of attention as well.


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#49 jaragon

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 08:12 PM

"The Silent World" men bond... :)..https://youtu.be/kMSaUTnTEp4


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#50 jaragon

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 07:50 PM

"Papillon" (1973) the bromance between Papillon (now isn't that a kind of gay nickname?) and Degas doesn't work because McQueen and Hoffman have zero chemistry .  At times it seems that Hoffman is playing the gay subtext but McQueen refuses to go there.  The other bromantic couple in the film are Julot ( Don Gordon) and Lariot ( Bill Mummy)  who share some sort of dad/son bond but that is quickly over when Julot decides to fake an injury and Lariot goes insane with out his father figure.

The most interesting out gay character is Maturette ( Robert Derman) - after Papillon suggest he gives the nasty prison guard a good time for money- Maturette almost slashes his throat- and later declares that he may be "A pansy, a **** and a poof" but he is no wimp because he killed a man.  ( I mean just one declaration of his sexuality was not enough)  Papillon could just have saved himself some bucks if he had just had sex with Maturette ( but hey McQueen was not going there! ) Maturette turns out to be one tough hombre during their escape -which made me wonder why Papillon doesn't dump the whiny useless Degas into the ocean and go live with Maturette on a nice island.   (SPOILER ALERT)

 

Unfortunate Maturetter must suffer the fate of most gay character of the period and is doomed.  The film really looses steam once he is out of the picture- Papillon's going native with a topless native woman seems to be in the film so that we know that the character is straight.


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#51 jaragon

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:38 PM

Don Coscarelli's  "Phamtasm" is about two brothers Mike played by the androgynous  Michael Baldwin and  Jody played by Bill Thornbury .  Mike  is a bit too obsessed with his older hunky sibling who he follows everywhere even when the guy is trying to get laid in a grave yard.  Reggie Basniter  is Jody's best friend who doesn't seem to have a girlfriend . The women in this film do not play a major role they are either victims or monsters.  Bill Thornbury is the movies main lust object. The main love story seems to be an unspoken attraction between Jody and Mike.  I know there have bee suggestion that Mike  is more than just gay coded- when Jody and the woman are making out- the camera cuts from a gratuitous shot of his naked **** to Mike's reaction.  And later Jody abandons the girl is order to take care of his younger brother.  The ending of the film suggest that perhaps Mike has found a safer male love object but of course in this classic horror movie nothing is ever what it seems.  I don't know if this was the director's intention or if just me looking for subtext- the casting specially of the twink like Baldwin and the smoking hot Thornbury doesn't hurt the gay reading of film. They don't just look like brothers but hey have a very physical relationship.   


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#52 rayban

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 09:19 PM

Fielding might be read as an stand in for E M Foster  or gay man from a generation that had to stay in the closet and eventually get married - the marriage specially seem arbitrary now- I might be reading too much into this but the woman seemed a bit masculine to me - the love story is really between the two men -  this is such a great film I specially love the scene in the temple with those scary monkeys- Lean was paying a hommage to Hitchcock

Yes, I agree, Fielding could be seen as a stand-in for E.M. Forster.  He did put some version of himself in most of his novels.

 

And, yes, I agree, "A Passage to India" is such a great film.

 

The sad fact is that it took the incomparable David Lean thirteen years to finance it.

 

It was due to the box-office failure of "Ryan's Daughter", which today can only be seen as another one of Mr. Lean's great films.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#53 jaragon

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 07:03 PM

Yes, I agree, the dynamic between Aziz and Fielding is an interesting one.

 

There is so much "subtext" in E.M. Forster's writing.

 

Fielding does seem an unusually compassionate soul.

 

He even comes to Ms. Quested's aid at the end when she could've been thrown to the wolves.

 

passagetoindia_4.jpg

Fielding might be read as an stand in for E M Foster  or gay man from a generation that had to stay in the closet and eventually get married - the marriage specially seem arbitrary now- I might be reading too much into this but the woman seemed a bit masculine to me - the love story is really between the two men -  this is such a great film I specially love the scene in the temple with those scary monkeys- Lean was paying a hommage to Hitchcock


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#54 rayban

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 06:15 PM

In "A Passage to India" (1984) there seems to be a real bromance between Aziz  and Fielding- I wonder if E M Foster wanted them to be more than just friends?   The Fielding character does come across a gay man  or is it just the way that Fox is playing him.  The woman he marries at the end seems to come out of nowhere- but we do get his touching reunion with Aziz who still seems to be single . https://youtu.be/ooEX7hw9j44

Yes, I agree, the dynamic between Aziz and Fielding is an interesting one.

 

There is so much "subtext" in E.M. Forster's writing.

 

Fielding does seem an unusually compassionate soul.

 

He even comes to Ms. Quested's aid at the end when she could've been thrown to the wolves.

 

passagetoindia_4.jpg


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#55 jaragon

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 06:03 PM

In "A Passage to India" (1984) there seems to be a real bromance between Aziz  and Fielding- I wonder if E M Foster wanted them to be more than just friends?   The Fielding character does come across a gay man  or is it just the way that Fox is playing him.  The woman he marries at the end seems to come out of nowhere- but we do get his touching reunion with Aziz who still seems to be single . https://youtu.be/ooEX7hw9j44


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#56 rayban

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 06:28 PM

It does sound like the writer lifted the plot from "Billy Bud".  "Straight" men usually show their love for each other by beating up their love object.

Jaragon -

 

yes, indeed, figuratively or literally.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#57 jaragon

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 02:26 PM

Dougie B, thank you - 

 

and thanks for bringing up an even more intriguing but similar situation in the film version of Herman Melville's "Billy Budd".

 

The sad fact of Richard Boone's hard-bitten veteran is that even if he did manage to bed George Hamilton's character, he probably would never be able to forgive himself.

 

But he would still continue to do it - and not talk about it.

 

The film itself presents such a negative, agonized view of men - without women.

 

So many of them get blindingly drunk - or, like Charles Bronson's character, fixate on sex with women.

 

And, of course, the reality is that sex - with men - could not have an unknown experience for these men. 

It does sound like the writer lifted the plot from "Billy Bud".  "Straight" men usually show their love for each other by beating up their love object.


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#58 rayban

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 11:46 AM

This is a good analysis of the phenomenon of bullying by men of other men disguising an underlying sexual attraction. There's a similar situation in Billy Budd in which an innocent (and "pretty") sailor is targeted by a "hardened he-man" officer, the result in that case being that the sailor actually is "nailed to the cross", ie: hung. The officer becomes convinced that Billy's basic friendliness is an attempt to "beguile" him and he punishes Billy accordingly.

Dougie B, thank you - 

 

and thanks for bringing up an even more intriguing but similar situation in the film version of Herman Melville's "Billy Budd".

 

The sad fact of Richard Boone's hard-bitten veteran is that even if he did manage to bed George Hamilton's character, he probably would never be able to forgive himself.

 

But he would still continue to do it - and not talk about it.

 

The film itself presents such a negative, agonized view of men - without women.

 

So many of them get blindingly drunk - or, like Charles Bronson's character, fixate on sex with women.

 

And, of course, the reality is that sex - with men - could not have an unknown experience for these men. 


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#59 DougieB

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 10:24 AM

 

 

Throughout the film, Boone is so intent on nailing Hamilton to the cross that the obsession seems to actually be a homosexual attraction.

 

In other words, how can a hardened he-man like Boone express his "love" other than by paying such close attraction to Hamilton so he can criticize his every move and tell him in detail about it?

 

This is a good analysis of the phenomenon of bullying by men of other men disguising an underlying sexual attraction. There's a similar situation in Billy Budd in which an innocent (and "pretty") sailor is targeted by a "hardened he-man" officer, the result in that case being that the sailor actually is "nailed to the cross", ie: hung. The officer becomes convinced that Billy's basic friendliness is an attempt to "beguile" him and he punishes Billy accordingly.


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"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#60 rayban

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 11:05 PM

"A Thunder of Drums" - this MGM Western is about the clash between two soldiers at an isolated fort that is trying to deal with rampaging Indians.

 

One of the officers is a hard-bitten veteran, who is played to the max by Richard Boone who believes that "bachelors make the best soldiers".

 

The other officer is well-connected and green and is played by George Hamilton who immediately gets the eye from Boone's character.

 

Throughout the film, Boone is so intent on nailing Hamilton to the cross that the obsession seems to actually be a homosexual attraction.

 

In other words, how can a hardened he-man like Boone express his "love" other than by paying such close attention to Hamilton so he can criticize his every move and tell him in detail about it?

 

A loving wife couldn't be more devoted.

 

When Hamilton's secret passion for an officer's lady (Luana Patten) goes off the rails, Boone is there to revel in the break-up and keep tabs on "his man".

 

In the end, Boone and Hamilton "reconcile" when Hamilton proves himself as a soldier and thus Boone can now invite him to his quarters.

 

Hamilton can be approached as an equal.

 

Throughout this film, there is a very strong homoerotic subtext, which is never actually addressed although it is always deeply "felt".

 

Boone's obsession is LOVE, a fact that he himself might never be able to face.

 

When, at the end, Hamilton loses Patten, Boone feels free to make his move - and he does make his move by inviting Hamilton into his after-hours life.

 

Again, he reminds Hamilton that "bachelors make the best soldiers".

 

"A Thunder of Drums" is a fascinating film - for what it implies and can never say.

 

The title can be taken both literally and figuratively - as the on-going assault of the Apaches on the cavalry and the fort and as the inner turmoil of a man who is struggling to deal with what he is feeling.

 

BY LOVE POSSESSED -

 

4575726_l3.jpg


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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