We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

Your Favourite Performances from 1989 are...


  • Please log in to reply
3984 replies to this topic

#21 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:26 PM

Lubaszenko actually appears in the same director's A Short Film About Love.  Have you seen that movie?

 

No, I haven't but I have copies of them.



#22 skimpole

skimpole

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,250 posts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:53 PM

Here are the films from 1988 that were mentioned that I have not seen as yet. 

 

 

 

 

A Short Film About Killing with Miroslaw Baka, Olaf Lubaszenko, Krzystof Globisz and Jan Tesarz

 

Lubaszenko actually appears in the same director's A Short Film About Love.  Have you seen that movie?



#23 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:00 PM

**Announcement**

We will be staring 1989 tomorrow, Thursday and it will run until next Tuesday/Wednesday at which point we will start the decade review.

People will be asked to vote for only one actor in each of the 5 categories for 1980 through 1989.  This is open to anyone so even if you have not participated in the year-by-year favourites please feel free to post your favourites of the decade next week after 1989 concludes.



#24 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:43 AM

Here are the films from 1988 that were mentioned that I have not seen as yet. 

 

Lair of the White Worm with Hugh Grant, Peter Capaldi and Amanda Donohoe

A Short Film About Killing with Miroslaw Baka, Olaf Lubaszenko, Krzystof Globisz and Jan Tesarz

Torch Song Trilogy with Harvey Fierstein

 

I've only seen these three! Despite the scarcity of titles, and the length of my unseen list, I should mention that I have seen 245 movies from 1988. Just not the right 245 movies, I guess.

 

A Short Film About Killing is good, and actually made a real change in its home country after its release. Poland suspended capital punishment for a time to review their policies. A shorter version of this is featured as part of Kieslowski's Dekalog/The Decalogue

 

2918_gl.jpg

 

Torch Song Trilogy is decent, as well, based on Harvey Fierstein's play. It's another step into the mainstream for Gay Cinema.

 

image-w448.jpg?1445911293

 

I enjoyed Lair of the White Worm, although not as much as Swithin, I think. It's bizarre (it was directed by Ken Russell, after all), but not as indulgently tedious as some of his more "outrageous" 70's films. Amanda Donohoe makes for a photogenic snake-woman, too.

 

LAIR_0003_Layer+1.jpg


  • Bogie56 and CoraSmith like this

#25 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 22 March 2017 - 06:18 AM

Here are the 1988 movies that I haven't seen:

 

Alice

Crossing Delancey

Drowning By Numbers

Grave of the Fireflies

A Handful of Dust

Heart of Midnight

The House on Carroll Street

La Letrice

Landscape in the Mist

Life is a Long Quiet River

Little Vera

Madame Sousatzka

The Moderns

Moon Over Parador

The Prince of Pennsylvania

Rented Lips

Salaam Bombay!

Spike of Bensonhurst

Stars and Bars

A Summer Story

Things Change

The Wash

A Winter Tan

A World Apart

 

The bulk of the films that i have seen above did not actually figure in my personal performance lists.

heartofmid3.jpg

Heart of Midnight is an odd film that won't be to all tastes.  Both Jennifer Jason Leigh and Brenda Vaccaro figured in my runner up lists and Leigh will get Danny Peary's Alternate Oscar nod for 1989.  Leigh inherits a nightclub from an uncle and moves in to renovate it.  Is it haunted?  Was it a house of kink?  Leigh lives in an apartment above the club and doesn't bolt when things get weird.  That's probably what makes the film interesting.

1485-2.jpg

Both James Wilby and Kristen Scott Thomas featured in my runner up lists for A Handful of Dust.  it's a solid drama about a crumbling upper class marriage.

W2zrFox.jpg

Little Vera had 4 performers that featured quite high on my list.  Most notably Natalya Negoda as Vera and Yuri Nazarov and Ludmila Zaitseva as her parents.  Her father is a vodka swilling alcoholic and her mother is away with the fairies.  Vera meets and falls in love with a young man and they plan to get married.  When he moves into the already cramped apartment things really start to boil over.  This is Soviet kitchen sink.  

salaam-bombay!-salaam-bombay!-raghubir-yMira Nair shot to fame after directing Salaam Bombay!.  It is a pretty hard look at an orphaned boy's life on the streets.  Raghuvir Yadav as the boy's drug addicted friend (above) was one of my picks as was Anita Kanwar who plays the boy's prostitute mother.

primary_EB19881023PEOPLE10010301AR.jpg

Things Change is well worth seeing for Don Ameche who seemed to be coming into his own again in the 1980's.  He plays someone who is appointed fall guy by the mafia .  Joe Mantegna plays his 'babysitter' until things go down.

$_35.JPG

Nobu McCarthy as the elderly neglected Japanese American wife of Mako in The Wash who decides to make a break and develop a relationship with another man was on my runner up list of actresses.  I believe it only exists on vhs at the moment.

0e3cb7c64411a41c9abb1b03b35b6099.jpg

Though she didn't figure in my list Jackie Burroughs (1939-2010) won Canada's Genie Award for A Winter Tan which is actually a 1987 film.  It is based on a true story of a woman who likes to vacation south for the boys with tragic consequences.  Charlotte Rampling did a similarly themed film with Vers le Sud (2005).

a-world-apart-1987-barbara-hershey-jodhiA World Apart is well worth seeing.  Its trio of actresses, Jodhi May, Barbara Hershey and Linda Mvusi shared the acting award at Cannes and better still made my list too.  May plays the daughter of activists in South Africa during apartheid.  


  • LawrenceA and CoraSmith like this

#26 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:06 AM

Here are the films from 1988 that were mentioned that I have not seen as yet. 

 

The Abyss with Gian Maria Volonte

Bakayaro! I’m Plenty Mad with Yasuo Daichi

Bear Ye One Another’s Burden with Jorg Pose and Manfred Mock

Boulevard of Broken Dreams with John Waters and Kim Gyngell

Burning Secret with Klaus Maria Brandauer

A Chaos of Flowers with Sayuri Yoshinaga and Eri Ishida

Clara’s Heart with Neil Patrick Harris

Codice Privato with Ornelia Muti

Compagni di Scuola with Athina Cenci

Crane with Sayuri Yoshinaga

Creditors with Tomas Bolme

The Discarnates with Tsurutaro Kataoka and Kumiko Akiyoshi

Distant Voices, Still Lives with Pete Postlethwaite, Freda Dowie, Dean Williams, Lorraine Ashbourne and Angela Wash

The Dressmaker with Billie Whitelaw

The Girlfriend with Cipe Lincovsky and Liv Ullmann

Hanussen with Kalsu Maria Brandauer

Hope and Pain with Eri Ishida

Itinerary of a Spoiled Child with Jean-Paul Belmondo

Kaisha Monogatari: Memories of You with Hajime HanaKaito Ruby with Kyoko Koizumi

Lair of the White Worm with Hugh Grant, Peter Capaldi and Amanda Donohoe

Lethal Film with Lena T. Hansson

The Little Devil with Roberto Benigni

Love Bites Back with Kaori Momoi

Mignon Has Come to Stay with Stefania Sandrelli and Massimo Dapporto

My Neighbor Tortoro with Noriko Hidaka

Obsessed with Colleen Dewhurst

Patti Rocks with Chris Mulkey

The Prince of Pennsylvania with Bonnie Bedelia and Amy Madigan

The Revolving Doors with Remy Girard

Scent of a Crime with Fernando Rey

Secret Access with Ornelia Muti

A Short Film About Killing with Miroslaw Baka, Olaf Lubaszenko, Krzystof Globisz and Jan Tesarz

The Silk Road with Toshiyuki Nishida

Talking to Strangers with Ken Gruz and Caron Tate

A Taxing Woman’s Return with Yasuo Daichi

Time of the Gypsies with Davour Dujomic and Sinolicka Trokova

Tomorrow with Kaori Momoi

Torch Song Trilogy with Harvey Fierstein

Winter Diary with Fernando Rey

Wuthering Heights with Eri Ishida

The Yen Family with Kaori Momoi

Yojo no Jidai with Tsurutaro Kataoka

 

 

And I would like to see these again …

 

Life Is a Long Quiet River for Helene Vincent

The Wash for Patti Yasutake



#27 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:23 PM

Here are the 1988 movies that I haven't seen:

 

The Abyss

Alice

Bakayaro! I'm Plenty Mad

Bear Ye One Another's Burden

Boulevard of Broken Dreams

Burning Secret

Buster

A Chaos of Flowers

Clara's Heart

Codice Privato

Compagni di Scuola

Crane

Creditors

Crossing Delancey

December 32

The Discarnates

Distant Voices, Still Lives

The Dressmaker

Drowning By Numbers

Emerald City

The Girlfriend

Grave of the Fireflies

A Handful of Dust

Hanussen

Heart of Midnight

Hope and Pain

The House on Carroll Street

Itinerary of a Spoiled Child

Kaisha Monogatari: Memories of You

Kaito Ruby

La Letrice

Landscape in the Mist

Lethal Film

Life is a Long Quiet River

The Little Devil

Little Vera

Love Bites Back

Madame Sousatzka

Mignon Has Come to Stay

The Moderns

Moon Over Parador

My Neighbor Totoro

Obsessed 

Patti Rocks

The Prince of Pennsylvania

Rented Lips

The Revolving Doors

Salaam Bombay!

Scent of a Crime

Secret Access

The Silk Road

Spike of Bensonhurst

Stars and Bars

A Summer Story

Talking to Strangers

A Taxing Woman's Return

Things Change

Time of the Gypsies

Tomorrow

The Wash

Winter Diary

A Winter Tan

A World Apart

Wuthering Heights

The Yen Family

Yojo no Jidai

 



#28 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 21 March 2017 - 04:55 PM

The Japanese Academy Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Toshiyuki Nishida, The Silk Road

 

Best Actress

Sayuri Yoshinaga, Crane and A Chaos of Flowers

 

Best Supporting Actor

Tsurutaro Kataoka, The Discarnates and Yojo no Jidai

 

Best Supporting Actress

Eri Ishda, Wuthering Heights and A Chaos of Flowers and Hope and Pain

 

—————————————————————————————

 

Japan’s Blue Ribbon Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Hajime Hana, Kaisha Monogatari: Memories of You

 

Best Actress

Kaori Momoi, The Yen Family and Love Bites Back and Tomorrow

 

Best Supporting Actor

Tsurutaro Kataoka, The Discarnates

 

Best Supporting Actress

Kumiko Akiyoshi, The Discarnates

 

—————————————————————————————

 

Japan’s Mainichi Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Hajime Hana, Kaisha Monogatari: Memories of You

 

Best Actress

Kyoko Koizumi, Kaito Ruby

 

Best Supporting Actor

Yasuo Daichi, A Taxing Woman’s Return and Bakayaro! I’m Plenty Mad

 

Best Supporting Actress

Kumiko Akiyoshi, The Discarnates



#29 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:47 PM

The Canadian Genie Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Jeremy Irons, Dead Ringers*

 

Best Actress

Jackie Burroughs, A Winter Tan*

 

Best Supporting Actor

Remy Girard, The Revolving Doors*

 

Best Supporting Actress

Colleen Dewhurst, Obsessed*

 

——————————————————————————————

 

The Australian Film Institute Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

John Waters, Boulevard of Broken Dreams*

 

Best Actress

Nadine Garner, Mull* (89) 

 

Best Supporting Actor

Kim Gyngell, Boulevard of Broken Dreams*

 

Best Supporting Actresses

Tina Bursill, Jilted* (87)



#30 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 21 March 2017 - 05:49 AM

Italy’s 87/88 Nastro d’Argento Film Awards for 1988 included …

 

Best Supporting Actor

Enzo Cannavale, December 32 (88)

 

Italy’s 88/89 Nastro d’Argento Film Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Gian Maria Volonte, The Abyss

 

Best Actress

Ornella Muti, Secret Access

 

Best Supporting Actor

Fabio Bussoti, Francesco (89)

 

Best Supporting Actress

Stefania Sandrelli, Mignon Has Come to Stay

 

——————————————————————————————

 

Italy’s 88/89 David di Donatello Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Roberto Benigni, The Little Devil

 

Best Foreign Actor

Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man

 

Best Actress

Stefania Sandrelli, Mignon Has Come to Stay

 

Best Foreign Actress

Jodie Foster, The Accused

 

Best Supporting Actors

Carlo Croccolo, The King of Naples (89)

Massimo Dapporto, Mignon Has Come to Stay

 

Best Supporting Actress

Athina Cenci, Compagni di Scuola



#31 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:28 PM

France’s Cesar Awards for 1988 were …

 

Best Actor

Jean-Paul Belmondo, Itinerary of a Spoiled Child

 

Best Actress

Isabelle Adjani, Camille Claudel

 

Best Supporting Actor

Patrick Chesnais, La Lectrice

 

Best Supporting Actress

Helene Vincent, Life Is a Long Quiet River

 

—————————————————————————————

 

Sweden’s Guldbagge Awards for 1988 were…

 

Best Actor

Tomas Boime, Creditors

 

Best Actress

Lena T. Hansson, Lethal Film



#32 TomJH

TomJH

    I know what gold does to men's souls.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,942 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:39 PM

Happy Yippee Ki Yahing, Lawrence!


  • LawrenceA and JamesStewartFan95 like this

#33 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:15 PM

Oddly enough, with all of this discussion, look what I received in the mail today:

 

91QU4cfAtNL._SX342_.jpg



#34 TomJH

TomJH

    I know what gold does to men's souls.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,942 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:09 PM

 

I would like to shine a little spotlight on Alan Rickman (1946-2016) and his performance in Die Hard.  I'm assuming that there may be a history of Englishmen playing villains in American films but Rickman seemed to take this to a new level which ushered in a whole slew of imitations.  Perhaps it is no accident that his 'Hans Gruber' is Nazi-like in his cold, clinical, sociopathic brilliance.  But in an evolving PC world having the villain played by an Englishman seemed to avoid a lot of cultural stereotypes and trappings.  That is until it was overdone.

 

Rickman is, indeed, memorable in his role. Die Hard has always been a special film to me. I'm a little disappointed that almost no one on the thread has made reference to Bruce Willis's performance, the price, I suppose, for any actor branded an "action star." I think Willis is quite remarkable in this film. In any event here's a review I wrote of the film a few months ago:

 

Die Hard (1988).

 

I recall the adrenaline rush of excitement I felt at the show when I first watched this major action hero hit in 1988. I can't really say that I'm a huge fan of the genre so popular for its fast edits, CGI effects, exploding soundtracks and over-the-top fantasy heroics. Yet this one hits all the right spots for me, having just seen it again for the first time in some years. 

 

Aside from the brilliance of the action scenes under John McTiernan's dynamic direction, the film is probably fondly remembered by many for its sense of humour sprinkled throughout. The screenplay is also deliberately anti-establishment, which undoubtedly adds to the appeal. All authority figures in this film are made out to be pompous or buffoons, whether it be the head of the L.A.P.D., the FBI or the media. 

 

It's the "little" guys that are the heroes of this film, which is, I guess, part of the film's proletariat appeal. Of course, Bruce Willis's John McClane is a super hero, performing all kinds of impossible stunts and only looking a little damaged at the end of it all, bleeding feet and all. But Willis still plays him as a person who cares about his wife and family (he's hoping to repair an estranged marriage at the film's beginning), and he is allowed one touching scene in which he sensitively expresses his regrets about that marriage. 

 

And when it comes to relatable characterizations from a "little" guy perhaps few would be so effective as Reginald VelJohnson, as the pastry eating LA police sergeant with whom McClane communicates throughout his ordeal on a walkie talkie. VelJohnson has an everyman appeal here that makes him most engaging. (The absence of cell phones in this film is a reminder that it was made almost three decades ago).

 

Of course, all super heroes need a super villain, and Die Hard certainly provides that in the form of Alan Rickman's memorable calculatingly intelligent, cool under pressure and totally cold blooded portrayal of Hans Gruber, the German head of the "terrorists"/robbers who take over a 35 storey LA highrise, holding 30 people captive. Rickman has about as many memorable moments in this film as does Willis, including a climactic slow motion finale for his character. 

 

It was a pleasure to once again watch Willis, perfectly cast in the film that really put him in the front rank as a film star. He has become largely branded an "action star" since though he has been in a variety of other film roles, as well. The actor really got himself into terrific condition for this film, his charm is apparent throughout, as well as his physical credibility in action scenes, and his ability to bring some leveling humour to a moment of action or suspense. 

 

What I've seen of Willis in the past ten years or so seems to be an actor largely walking through his roles, with a minimum effort as he collects the pay cheque in largely second rate films. Die Hard is a reminder of what an excellent actor he could be in the right role. 

 

His insolent cry of "Yipppee Ki Yah, mother*****" to the villain will remain one of the indelible line deliveries of action movies, one for which he will always be associated. It was a statement of McClane's defiance against overwhelming odds that will make an audience laugh and cheer at the same time. It was also a brief tribute to old time cowboy stars. Bravo, Bruce! 

 

There have been four sequels to Die Hard (so far). The first two were serviceable action films, while the fourth and fifth entries in the series were fairly negligible efforts. No surprise, I suppose, that the 1988 original is the sole one in the series that deserves to be ranked as a classic of its kind.

 

2d9tgld.jpg


  • Bogie56, LawrenceA and JamesStewartFan95 like this

#35 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:43 PM

Here are some performances from 1988 that will be recognized in subsequent years …

 

Isabelle Adjani will win the Berlin Film Festival Best Actress Award and be nominated for the Best Actress Oscar in 1989 for Camile Claudel (1988).

 

Philippe Noiret will win the BAFTA Best Actor Award in 1990 for Cinema Paradiso (1988).

 

Dustin Hoffman will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Actor Award in 1989 for Rain Man (1988).

 

Jodie Foster will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Actress Award in 1989 for The Accused (1988).

 

Glenn Close will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Actress Award in 1989 for Dangerous Liaisons (1988).

 

Melanie Griffith will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Actress Award in 1989 for Working Girl (1988).

 

Salvatore Cascio will win the BAFTA Best Supporting Actor Award in 1990 for Cinema Paradiso (1988).

 

Michelle Pfeiffer will win the BAFTA Best Supporting Actress Award in 1989 for Dangerous Liaisons (1988).

 

Peggy Ashcroft will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Supporting Actress Award in 1989 for Madame Sousatzka (1988).

 

Sigourney Weaver will be nominated for the BAFTA Best Supporting Actress Award in 1989 for Working Girl (1988).

 

Nicolas Cage will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Actor Award in 1989 for Vampire’s Kiss (1988).

 

Winona Ryder will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Actress Award in 1989 for Heathers (1988).

 

Mare Winningham will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Supporting Best Actress Award in 1989 for Miracle Mile (1988).

 

Gene Hackman will win the Berlin Film Festival Best Actor Award in 1989 for Mississippi Burning (1988).

 

Meryl Streep will win the Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award and the Australian Film Institute’s Best Actress Award in 1989 for A Cry In the Dark (1988).

 

Turo Pajala will win the Moscow International Film Festival Best Actor Award in 1989 for Ariel (1988).

 

Enzo Cannavale won Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Best Supporting Actress Award in 87/88  for December 32 (1988).

 

Sam Neill will win the Australian Film Institute’s Best Actor Award in 1989 for A Cry In the Dark (1988).

 

Chris Haywood will win the Australian Film Institute’s Best Supporting Actor Award in 1989 for Emerald City (1988).



#36 JamesStewartFan95

JamesStewartFan95

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 340 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 02:40 PM

hansgruber.jpg?itok=vrbtcK0f

I would like to shine a little spotlight on Alan Rickman (1946-2016) and his performance in Die Hard.  I'm assuming that there may be a history of Englishmen playing villains in American films but Rickman seemed to take this to a new level which ushered in a whole slew of imitations.  Perhaps it is no accident that his 'Hans Gruber' is Nazi-like in his cold, clinical, sociopathic brilliance.  But in an evolving PC world having the villain played by an Englishman seemed to avoid a lot of cultural stereotypes and trappings.  That is until it was overdone.

 

Not to mention all of the wonderful supporting players that I felt bad for leaving off my list such as Alexander Godunov as Karl, Devoreaux White as Argyle, Clarence Gilyard Jr. as Theo, Reginald VelJohnson as Al, Hart Bochner as Harry Ellis, William Atherton as Richard Thornburg, and Bonnie Bedelia as Holly Venero-McClane. 


  • Bogie56 and LawrenceA like this

#37 Bogie56

Bogie56

    Prof. Knucklehead

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,519 posts
  • LocationTralfamadore

Posted 20 March 2017 - 01:40 PM

The 1988 Venice Film Festival winners were:

 

Best Actors

Don Ameche and Joe Mantegna, Things Change*

Klaus Maria Brandauer, Burning Secret*

 

Best Actresses

Shirley MacLaine, Madame Sousatzka*

Isabelle Huppert, Story of Women*

Carmen Maura, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown*

Ornelia Muti, Codice Privato*

 

—————————————————————————————————

 

The 1988 San Sebastian Film Festival winners were…

 

Best Actor

Fernando Rey, Winter Diary and Scent of a Crime*

 

Best Actresses

Cipe Lincovsky and Liv Ullmann, The Girlfriend*



#38 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:22 AM

 

I would like to shine a little spotlight on Alan Rickman (1946-2016) and his performance in Die Hard.  I'm assuming that there may be a history of Englishmen playing villains in American films but Rickman seemed to take this to a new level which ushered in a whole slew of imitations.  Perhaps it is no accident that his 'Hans Gruber' is Nazi-like in his cold, clinical, sociopathic brilliance.  But in an evolving PC world having the villain played by an Englishman seemed to avoid a lot of cultural stereotypes and trappings.  That is until it was overdone.

 

The European terrorist/bad guy in American action movies became so prevalent that by the time Jeremy Irons showed up in 1995's Die Hard with a Vengeance (as the brother of Rickman's character, no less) he played it almost as a parody of the cliche.


  • Bogie56 likes this

#39 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:13 AM

I would like to flashback to 1986 if I may as I watched Poltergeist II: The Other Side last night.  Thanks to Lawrence's tip I enjoyed Julian Beck's turn as the Reverend Henry Kane all the more.  His creepy performance was the highlight of an otherwise preposterously silly movie.  It just shows that actors can do good work in average or even bad movies.  I have to say that I enjoyed the film as well.  It got worse as it went along which only made it more fun.  To make some sense of the mumbo-jumo they had Will Sampson as the mystical Indian, a flying dead Granny and Craig Nelson somehow came to the conclusion that to defeat the evil he had to climb down into the subterranean graveyard with family in tow to find out what was what.  And what happened to the older daughter between the closing credits of the last film and the opening credits of this one?  It almost ranks up there with Xanadu and Sextette in terms of wacky, possibly drug influenced screenwriting.

 

Lol...I'm glad you enjoyed it. Did you like the tequila worm monster that Nelson regurgitated? Truly fun for the whole family (and this movie was marketed for families!).

 

As for the older daughter, I didn't recall if they commented on her or not. The actress from the first first, Dominique Dunne, was murdered after she was in the first film, so they may have felt that instead of recasting they'd leave her character out.

 

https://en.wikipedia...Dominique_Dunne


  • Bogie56 likes this

#40 JamesStewartFan95

JamesStewartFan95

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 340 posts

Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:45 AM

My Best Actor choice (a last-minute switch from a stellar Gene Hackman in Mississippi Burning) is River Phoenix in only his sixth film, Running on Empty. An all-around well acted movie with a cast that includes Judd Hirsch, Christine Lahti, and Martha Plimpton, Running On Empty is River Phoenix's film. His turn as Danny Pope, the son of a couple on the run for a bombing in the 1960's, played by Judd Hirsch and Christine Lahti, is one where he steps into the realm of true leading actor quality. Danny is emotional, shattered by his love for his parents, while attempting to lead a life of his own away from association with his parents' crime. He is truly the best actor in the movie and this performance partnered with his turn as Chris Chambers in Stand by Me is the reason why I like Phoenix so much as an actor.

 

 


  • Bogie56 and LawrenceA like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users