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Your Favourite Performances from 2002 are...


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#1 Bogie56

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Posted Today, 08:57 AM

Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Sergio Castellitto, My Mother’s Smile*

 

Best Actress

Valeria Golino, Respiro*

 

Best Supporting Actor

Leo Gullotta, Vajont - La Diga del Disonore* (01)

 

Best Supporting Actresses

Margherita Buy, Virna Lisi and Sandra Ceccarelli, The Best Day of My Life*

 

——————————————————————————————

 

Italy’s 01/02 David di Donatello Awards for 2002 included …

 

Best Actor

Giancarlo Giannini, Eugenio I Love You* 

 

Best Actress

Marina Confalone, A Neapolitan Spell* 

 

Italy’s 02/03 David di Donatello Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Massimo Girotti, Facing Windows* (03)

 

Best Actress

Giovanna Mezzogiorno, Facing Windows* (03)

 

Best Supporting Actor

Ernesto Mahieux, The Embalmer*

 

Best Supporting Actresses

Piera Degli Esposti, My Mother’s Smile*



#2 Bogie56

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Posted Today, 04:42 AM

France’s Cesar Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Adrien Brody, The Pianist*

 

Best Actress

Isabelle Carre, Beautiful Memories*

 

Best Supporting Actor

Bernard Le Coq, Beautiful Memories*

 

Best Supporting Actress

Karen Vlard, Summer Things*

 

—————————————————————————————

 

Sweden’s Guldbagge Awards for 2002 were…

 

Best Actor

Michael Nyqvist, The Guy In the Grave Next Door*

 

Best Actress

Oksana Akinshina, Lilya 4-ever*

 

Best Supporting Actor

Goran Ragnerstam, Suxxess*

 

Best Supporting Actress

Cecilia Frode, The Reunion*



#3 Bogie56

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Posted Yesterday, 08:34 PM

Here are some performances from 2002 that will be recognized in subsequent years …

 

Keisha Castle-Hughes will be nominated for the Best Actress Oscar and the Washington DC Film Critics Association Best Actress Award in 2003 for Whale Rider (2002).  She will win the Broadcast Film Critics Juvenile Acting award and be nominated by the Screen Actors Awards for Best Supporting Actress.

 

Samantha Morton will be nominated for the Best Actress Oscar and the Independent Spirit and Broadcast Film Critics Best Actress Awards in 2003 for In America (2002).

 

Djimon Watanabe will be nominated for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar and the Independent Spirit Best Supporting Actor Award in 2003 for In America (2002).

 

Hope Davis will win the New York Film Critics Best Actress Award and be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Supporting Actress Award in 2003 for The Secret Lives of Dentists (2002).

 

Sarah Bolger will be nominated for the Washington DC Film Critics Association Best Supporting Actress Award in 2003 for In America (2002).

 

Kate Dollenmayer will be nominated for the National Society of Film Critics Best Actress Award in 2005 for Funny Ha Ha (2002).

 

Bill Nighy will win the Los Angeles Film Critics Best Supporting Actor Award in 2003 for AKA (2002) and three other films.

 

Samantha Morton will win the Toronto Film Critics Association Best Actress Award in 2003 for Morvern Callar (2002).

 

Miranda Richardson will win the Toronto Film Critics Association Best Supporting Actress Award in 2003 for Spider (2002).

 

Chiwetel Ejiofor will be nominated for the Washington DC Film Critics Association Best Actor Award in 2003 for Dirty Pretty Things (2002).

 

Agnes Bruckner will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Actress Award in 2003 for Blue Car (2002).

 

Alessandro Nivola will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Supporting Actor Award in 2003 for Laurel Canyon (2002).

 

Frances McDormand will be nominated for the Independent Spirit Best Supporting Actress Award in 2003 for Laurel Canyon (2002).

 

Sam Rockwell will win the Berlin Film Festival Best Actor Award in 2003 for Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002).

 

Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman and Julianne Moore will win the Berlin Film Festival Best Actress Award in 2003 for The Hours (2002).

 

Muzaffer Ozdemir will win the Cannes Film Festival Best Actor Award in 2003 for Distant (2002).

 

Bibi Andersson will win Sweden's Guldbagge Best Supporting actress Award in 2003 for Elina: As If I Wasn't There (2002).

 

Gigi Proietti will win Italy’s Nastro d’Argento Film Journalists Best Supporting Actor Award in 2003 for The Mandrake Sting (2002).

 

Giancarlo Giannini won Italy’s David di Donatello Best Actor Award in 01/02 for I Love You (2002).

 

Marina Confalone won Italy’s David di Donatello Best Actress Award in 01/02 for A Neapolitan Spell (2002).

 

Kiichi Nakai will win the Japanese Academy Best Actor Award in 2003 for When the Last Sword Is Drawn (2000).

 

Koichi Sato will win the Japanese Academy Best Supporting Actor Award in 2003 for When the Last Sword Is Drawn (2000).


Edited by Bogie56, Today, 04:49 AM.


#4 Bogie56

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Posted Yesterday, 03:16 PM

The 2002 Venice Film Festival winners were:

 

Best Actors

Stefano Accorsi, A Journey Called Love*

Jean Rochefort, Man on the Train*

 

Best Actress

Julianne Moore, Far from Heaven*

 

—————————————————————————————————

 

The 2002 San Sebastian Film Festival winners were…

 

Best Actor

Peigi Liu, Together*

 

Best Actress

Mercedes Sampietro, Common Ground*

 

——————————————————————————————

 

The 2002 Moscow International Film Festival winners were …

 

Best Actor

Ville Haapasaio, The Cuckoo*

 

Best Actress

Mikako Ichikawa, Blue*



#5 Bogie56

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Posted Yesterday, 12:57 PM

The 2002 Berlin International Film Festival winners were…

 

Best Actor

Jacques Gamblin, Safe Conduct*

 

Best Actress

Halle Berry, Monster’s Ball* (01)

 

——————————————————————————————

 

The 2002 Cannes Film Festival winners were…

 

Best Actor

Olivier Gourmet, The Son*

 

Best Actress

Kati Outinen, The Man Without a Past*



#6 skimpole

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Posted Yesterday, 12:48 PM

The Golden Globe Awards for 2002 were …

 


Kieran Culkin, Igby Goes to Town


 

 

Best Supporting Actress


Susan Sarandon, Igby Goes to Town

 

I believe the movie is actually called Igby Goes Down


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#7 Bogie56

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Posted Yesterday, 10:25 AM

The Golden Globe Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor in a Drama

Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt*

Leonardo DiCaprio, Catch Me If You Can

Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York

Adrien Brody, The Pianist

Michael Caine, The Quiet American

 

Best Actresses in a Drama

Nicole Kidman, The Hours* 

Julianne Moore, Far From Heaven

Salma Hayek, Frida

Meryl Streep, The Hours

Diane Lane, Unfaithful

 

Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical

Richard Gere, Chicago*

Hugh Grant, About a Boy

Nicolas Cage, Adaptation

Kieran Culkin, Igby Goes Down

Adam Sandler, Punch Drunk Love

 

Best Actresses in a Comedy or Musical

Renee Zellweger, Chicago*

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Secretary

Goldie Hawn, The Banger Sisters

Catherine Zeta-Jones, Chicago

Nia Vardalos, My big Fat Greek Wedding

 

Best Supporting Actor

Chris Cooper, Adaptation*

John C. Reilly, Chicago

Dennis Quaid, Far From Heaven

Ed Harris, The Hours

Paul Newman, Road to Perdition

 

Best Supporting Actress

Meryl Streep, Adaptation*

Kathy Bates, About Schmidt

Queen Latifah, Chicago

Cameron Diaz, Gangs of New York

Susan Sarandon, Igby Goes Down


Edited by Bogie56, Yesterday, 12:52 PM.


#8 Bogie56

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Posted Yesterday, 05:03 AM

The Screen Actors Guild Awards for 2002 were ….

 

Best Actor

Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York*

Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt

Nicolas Cage, Adaptation

Richard Gere, Chicago

Adrien Brody, The Pianist

 

Best Actress

Renee Zellweger, Chicago*

Julianne Moore, Far From Heaven

Salma Hayek, Frida

Nicole Kidman, The Hours

Diane Lane, Unfaithful

 

Best Supporting Actor

Christopher Walken, Catch Me If You Can*

Chris Cooper, Adaptation

Dennis Quaid, Far From Heaven

Alfred Molina, Frida

Ed Harris, The Hours

 

Best Supporting Actress

Catherine Zeta-Jones, Chicago*

Kathy Bates, About Schmidt

Queen Latifah, Chicago

Julianne Moore, The Hours

Michelle Pfeiffer, White Oleander



#9 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

The 01/02 British Independent Film Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

James Nesbitt, Bloody Sunday*

Timothy Spall, All or Nothing

Bill Nighy, Lawless Heart (01)

Richard Harris, My Kingdom (01)

 

Best Actress

Samantha Morton, Morvern Callar*

Elaine Cassidy, Disco Pigs (01)

Shirley Henderson, Villa des Roses

Harriet Walter, Villa des Roses

 

 

The 02/03 British Independent Film Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Chiwetel Eijofor, Dirty Pretty Things*

Joaquin Phoenix, Buffalo Soldiers

Paddy Considine, In America

Kevin McKidd, 16 Years of Alcohol (03)

Ewan McGregor, Young Adam (03)

 

Best Actress

Olivia Williams, The Heart of Me*

Helena Bonham Carter, The Heart of Me

Samantha Morton, In America

Kate Ashfield, This Little Life

Tilda Swinton, Young Adam (03)

 

Best Supporting Actor/Actress

Susan Lynch, 16 Years of Alcohol* (03)

Sophie Okenedo, Dirty Pretty Things

Benedict Wong, Dirty Pretty Things

Shirley Henderson, Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself

Adrian Rawlins, Wilbur Wants to Kill Himself



#10 LawrenceA

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:13 PM

The Independent Spirit Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

 

Jeremy Renner, Dahmer

 

That was another good one. It was the first thing I recall seeing Renner in, and I never would have expected that he would eventually become a big star playing superheros and the like.

 

I'm also surprised the movie was nominated. There was a string of cheap exploitation films based on the lives of serial killers released around that time, such as Ed Gein with Steve Railsback, Gacy with Mark Holton, Ted Bundy with Michael Reilly Burke, and Nightstalker with Bret Roberts. I watched them all, and Renner as Dahmer stood out as superior to the rest.


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#11 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 03:42 PM

The Independent Spirit Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Derek Luke, Antwone Fisher* 

Jeremy Renner, Dahmer

Danny Huston, Ivansxtc (00)

Campbell Scott, Roger Dodger

Graham Greene, Skins

 

Best Actress

Julianne Moore, Far From Heaven*

Jennifer Anniston, The Good Girl

Catherine Keener, Lovely & Amazing (01)

Parker Posey, Personal Velocity: Three Portraits

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Secretary

 

Best Supporting Actor

Dennis Quaid, Far From Heaven*

John C. Reilly, The Good Girl

Peter Weller, Ivansxtc (00)

Ray Liotta, Narc

Alan Arkin, Thirteen Conversations About One Thing (01)

 

Best Supporting Actress

Emily Mortimer, Lovely & Amazing* (01)

Viola Davis, Antwone Fisher

Jacqueline Kim, Charlotte Sometimes

Juliette Lewis, Hysterical Blindness

Julianne Nicholson, Tully (00)



#12 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:54 PM

The BAFTA Awards for 2002 were ….

 

Best Actor

Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York* 

Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt

Nicolas Cage, Adaptation

Adrien Brody, The Pianist

Michael Caine, The Quiet American

 

Best Actress

Nicole Kidman, The Hours*

Renee Zellweger, Chicago

Salma Hayek, Frida

Meryl Streep, The Hours

Helle Berry, Monster’s Ball (00)

 

Best Supporting Actor

Christopher Walken, Catch Me If You Can* 

Chris Cooper, Adaptation

Alfred Molina, Frida

Ed Harris, The Hours

Paul Newman, Road to Perdition

 

Best Supporting Actress

Catherine Zeta-Jones, Chicago* 

Toni Collette, About a Boy

Meryl Streep, Adaptation

Queen Latifah, Chicago

Julianne Moore, The Hours



#13 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:36 PM

The Broadcast Film Critics or Critics’ Choice Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actors

Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York*

Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt*

 

Best Actress

Julianne Moore, Far From Heaven*

Nicole Kidman, The Hours

Salma Hayek, Frida

Diane Lane, Unfaithful

 

Best Supporting Actor

Chris Cooper, Adaptation*

Alfred Molina, Frida

Paul Newman, Road to Perdition

 

Best Supporting Actress

Catherine Zeta-Jones, Chicago*

Meryl Streep, Adaptation

Kathy Bates, About Schmidt

 

Best Juvenile Performance

Kieran Culkin, Igby Goes Down*

Tyler Hoechin, Road to Perdition

Nicolas Hoult, About a Boy



#14 Swithin

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:33 PM

Copy that, I just checked that out. You make the good point there that the Oscars are in a sense an LA Film Festival because they don't even go by US release, but Los Angeles release, which is indeed silly and insular. However in that earlier discussion you said "So, lets just go by the year the film was released to the public" which isn't actually what's been done here since that would exclude private premieres. That and the "film festivals and premieres are used to judge original release dates" are the sticking points for me. It's conflating a premiere with a release, those aren't the same thing. A premiere is not a release unless the premiere is simultaneous to and a part of the film being released by a distributor into public exhibition, which isn't the case with the vast majority of festival screenings that are being mislabeled as releases. This thread goes by premiere date and that's fine, I think consistency is all that really matters so we're all considering the same crop of films and we are here, but calling a film festival screening, particularly one like Cannes which is not in any sense open to the public a "release" or saying that's its "release date" is objectively wrong. I don't mean to be pedantic but those words have specific meanings in relation to film and distribution. Perhaps it merely stems from IMDb listing premieres under their "Release Info" tab and there not being a better readily accessible source for film data.

 

 

I don't think this is rocket science. If someone includes a film from a slightly different year -- perhaps a variant -- it's no big deal. I tend to use IMDB or Wikipedia.


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#15 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:33 PM

Copy that, I just checked that out. You make the good point there that the Oscars are in a sense an LA Film Festival because they don't even go by US release, but Los Angeles release, which is indeed silly and insular. However in that earlier discussion you said "So, lets just go by the year the film was released to the public" which isn't actually what's been done here since that would exclude private premieres. That and the "film festivals and premieres are used to judge original release dates" are the sticking points for me. It's conflating a premiere with a release, those aren't the same thing. A premiere is not a release unless the premiere is simultaneous to and a part of the film being released by a distributor into public exhibition, which isn't the case with the vast majority of festival screenings that are being mislabeled as releases. This thread goes by premiere date and that's fine, I think consistency is all that really matters so we're all considering the same crop of films and we are here, but calling a film festival screening, particularly one like Cannes which is not in any sense open to the public a "release" or saying that's its "release date" is objectively wrong. I don't mean to be pedantic but those words have specific meanings in relation to film and distribution. Perhaps it merely stems from IMDb listing premieres under their "Release Info" tab and there not being a better readily accessible source for film data.

 

It was just one example and there are certainly others, but I chose it because my understanding from Andrzej Wajda, who produced the film and discussed it with my class at FAMU in Prague, is that there were no screenings (theatrical showings) of Interrogation until 1989 except for a censorship board made up of a handful of people. Andrzej and the director Ryszard Bugajski showed low-quality VHS copies they were able to sneak out of the Telecine transfer studio within months of it being banned (which would still be 1983 at the earliest) to fellow filmmakers on an individual or handful of people at a time basis and with the help of some university students those tapes were, later on, dubbed and handed out in film clubs and the like on a basically black market basis, but that's hardly a "release" by any reasonable metric. The film wasn't released anywhere until 1989.

 

Certainly the Oscars have their own outlier examples of absurdity, oddly specific rules, and there are often large gaps between a foreign film's initial honest-to-goodness release in its home country and release stateside, I don't take issue with deciding to go by premiere date or think it's any more flawed than AMPAS's metric, I was just taking issue with declaring a private premiere a release. If all you mean is initial screening on record or premiere date is used to determine year eligibility in this thread, then we are on the same page.

 

The films that premiere at the Toronto Film festival are open to the public.  Perhaps some at Cannes are not.  That festival is in May so it is highly likely that films from there would be shown elsewhere within that year.

If I haven't already done so I would have made a provision for all film festivals irregardless of who gets in to see them.  Private premieres are another matter but it is hard to determine which films are strictly private based on the information available to us.  I've been to big premieres in London's Leicester Square and they are usually a mix of people who worked on the film and the public.  But unless you attended who would know that afterward?  I find it easier to just go by the dates that wikipedia and the imdb provide.

Regarding, Interrogation I explained sometime earlier that I have a personal rule to apply to banned films.  I use the date of completion as opposed to the date, often many years later, when it was officially released to the public.  I think it is just unfair to compare the films using a later date and as this is just fantasy football I therefore use the original date.  

If Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind is ever released I may just use the date in which it was shot to compare with other films.  That's a hard one.



#16 KilgoreTrout

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 12:55 PM

KilgoreTrout if you want to go back about 200 pages in this thread you will discover that the issue of dating a film for the purposes of this thread has been thoroughly discussed.  I once used the example of Chaplin's Limelight (1952) which won an Oscar at the 1973 awards because it wasn't released in Los Angeles until then to show that you can find absurd examples.  In this thread Film festivals and premieres are used to judge original release dates wherever they may be.

BTW copes of Interrogation were smuggled out of Poland and screened underground circa 1982.

 

Copy that, I just checked that out. You make the good point there that the Oscars are in a sense an LA Film Festival because they don't even go by US release, but Los Angeles release, which is indeed silly and insular. However in that earlier discussion you said "So, lets just go by the year the film was released to the public" which isn't actually what's been done here since that would exclude private premieres. That and the "film festivals and premieres are used to judge original release dates" are the sticking points for me. It's conflating a premiere with a release, those aren't the same thing. A premiere is not a release unless the premiere is simultaneous to and a part of the film being released by a distributor into public exhibition, which isn't the case with the vast majority of festival screenings that are being mislabeled as releases. This thread goes by premiere date and that's fine, I think consistency is all that really matters so we're all considering the same crop of films and we are here, but calling a film festival screening, particularly one like Cannes which is not in any sense open to the public a "release" or saying that's its "release date" is objectively wrong. I don't mean to be pedantic but those words have specific meanings in relation to film and distribution. Perhaps it merely stems from IMDb listing premieres under their "Release Info" tab and there not being a better readily accessible source for film data.

 

It was just one example and there are certainly others, but I chose it because my understanding from Andrzej Wajda, who produced the film and discussed it with my class at FAMU in Prague, is that there were no screenings (theatrical showings) of Interrogation until 1989 except for a censorship board made up of a handful of people. Andrzej and the director Ryszard Bugajski showed low-quality VHS copies they were able to sneak out of the Telecine transfer studio within months of it being banned (which would still be 1983 at the earliest) to fellow filmmakers on an individual or handful of people at a time basis and with the help of some university students those tapes were, later on, dubbed and handed out in film clubs and the like on a basically black market basis, but that's hardly a "release" by any reasonable metric. The film wasn't released anywhere until 1989. Which isn't to say it isn't fair to consider it eligible for 1982 in this thread with a different metric.

 

Certainly the Oscars have their own outlier examples of absurdity, oddly specific rules, and there are often large gaps between a foreign film's initial honest-to-goodness release in its home country and release stateside, I don't take issue with deciding to go by premiere date or think it's any more flawed than AMPAS's qualifiers, I was just taking issue with declaring a private premiere a release. If all you mean is initial screening on record or premiere date is used to determine year eligibility in this thread, then we are on the same page.



#17 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 12:18 PM

The Toronto Film Critics Association Awards for 2002 were …

 

Best Actor

Nicolas Cage, Adaptation*

Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York

Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt

 

Best Actress

Julianne Moore, Far from Heaven*

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Secretary

Isabelle Huppert, The Piano Teacher

 

Best Supporting Actor

Chris Cooper, Adaptation*

Paul Newman, Road to Perdition

Dennis Quaid, Far From Heaven

 

Best Supporting Actress

Emily Watson, Punch Drunk Love*

Kathy Bates, About Schmidt

Toni Collette, About a Boy



#18 Bogie56

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 11:54 AM

KilgoreTrout if you want to go back about 200 pages in this thread you will discover that the issue of dating a film for the purposes of this thread has been thoroughly discussed.  I once used the example of Chaplin's Limelight (1952) which won an Oscar at the 1973 awards because it wasn't released in Los Angeles until then to show that you can find absurd examples.  In this thread Film festivals and premieres are used to judge original release dates wherever they may be.

BTW copes of Interrogation were smuggled out of Poland and screened underground circa 1982.



#19 KilgoreTrout

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 10:13 AM

I take it that this is because you like to compare your choices to that of films nominated for an Oscar. But any film not nominated for an Oscar you go by the original release date and not necessarily when it was released in North America. So two sets of rules.
For the purposes of this thread I decided that we should just go by the film's original release date no matter which country that was in. For the Oscars are nothing more than a Los Angeles Film Festival. Its qualifications are determined by the release date in that city alone.

Actually, In America wasn't released anywhere until 2003, it was first released in the UK and Ireland on October 31, 2003. However it premiered at the Toronto Film Festival over a year earlier in September of 2002. Premiere ≠ release. I included it with my 2002 choices to be consistent with the thread but the thread is not based on classifying a film per its original release, it's based on classifying it per its premiere.

A film's original release is when its owners have officially distributed it for public consumption. When it is released any person can walk up to a public theater that is showing the film and purchase a ticket (or the equivalent for straight-to-DVD, VOD, Netflix, etc. movies). A premiere is the first screening anywhere of a film, which was usually just an private viewing for cast, crew, and press but has increasingly become a private screening at a film festival for critics, judges, and industry folks as a means of garnering positive attention for the film's eventual release or oftentimes in order to secure a distributor so the film can be released. At Cannes for instance, only invited credentialed guests can attend a premiere and at least half the time these days the film has no distributor or means of release at the time and on occassion actually never finds one.

I prefer to go by release in my country for my lists or at least original release date, because simply listing a film based on initial premiere screening leads to absurdities like Interrogation being called a 1982 film even though literally the only screening of it that occurred then was for the small Soviet censorship board (think the MPAA with military backing) that banned it for a decade before it was actually released anywhere or the fact that I attended a private screening of Boyhood in 2012 and several screenings in 2013 in a theater should by their rules make it a 2012 film and only by virtue of the fact that those screenings were never advertised or written about by the media does it get to remain a 2014 release. So what determines a premiere, in this case being conflated with a release, is as arbitrary as whether or not someone heard about a screening and added it to IMDb whereas an initial release is much more clearcut. It's not my thread and it seems to have consistently gone by initial premiere date, or at least what IMDb lists as initial premiere date, so there is a simple enough guideline and that's how I've been listing titles here but you should be clear on what your qualifying rules are.

#20 CoraSmith

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:42 AM

Michael Caine once said in a BBC interview that there shouldn't be a difference between a dialogue in a film and a dialogue in real life. When two actors are rehearsing a dialogue and somebody enters the room he shouldn't be able to tell whether they're rehearsing or just having a conversation. His natural acting can be seen in his dialogues with Brendan Fraser in The Quiet American. This adaptation of Graham Greene's novel about Vietnam in the 1950s is more faithful than the 1958 version. It's critical of the American involvement instead of putting all the blame on the communists. The local beauty Phuong is played by Vietnamese actress Do Thi Hai Yen instead of the painted Italian Giorgia Moll.

 

http://www.trading-h...nl/ABAV04E.html

 

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