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The Story of Temple Drake


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#1 TopBilled

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 06:24 PM

I agree with your theory about reshoots and editing.  We are left to fill in the blanks as to her feelings about Trigger.  The film establishes Temple Drake as a sort of libertine.  She comes across as the type of woman who could feel comfortable at a boxing match with all the rough language and shady characters, i.e. gangsters at those events, as well as at an Ivy League soiree, befitting her aristocratic upbringing.  And Hopkins could play these women as well as anyone.

Love how you describe Temple Drake, and even more, what you say about Miriam Hopkins. Agree on both counts.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#2 cinemaspeak59

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 11:27 AM

Good points. My theory is they edited things and reshot some scenes to get approval from the MPAA for re-release once the code was rigorously enforced. I don't think the version we see now was the original version, as audiences first saw it. And if so, the original uncut film might have been much clearer and explicit about the nature of the rape and how it took place.

I agree with your theory about reshoots and editing.  We are left to fill in the blanks as to her feelings about Trigger.  The film establishes Temple Drake as a sort of libertine.  She comes across as the type of woman who could feel comfortable at a boxing match with all the rough language and shady characters, i.e. gangsters at those events, as well as at an Ivy League soiree, befitting her aristocratic upbringing.  And Hopkins could play these women as well as anyone.


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#3 TopBilled

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 07:47 AM

Temple Drake is a powerful film and Hopkins give a great performance.    As for the rape by Trigger and how they even came to the point where he brings her to that flop house;   yea,  the way the screenplay is written and the scenes directed,  makes the film very neutral as it relates to what the primary cause is.     Trigger makes it clear that she isn't being forced into anything,  but since she doesn't really respond I find what he says hard to believe.    So while later scenes makes it clear Drake was the victim, it is still difficult to determine how much of her own actions are responsible for her being a victim in the eyes of the screenwriter and director.

Good points. My theory is they edited things and reshot some scenes to get approval from the MPAA for re-release once the code was rigorously enforced. I don't think the version we see now was the original version, as audiences first saw it. And if so, the original uncut film might have been much clearer and explicit about the nature of the rape and how it took place.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#4 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 08:01 PM

The Story of Temple Drake is quite a powerful film.  Miriam Hopkins, early in her career, excelled at playing the high society, wealthy party girl the papers loved writing about.  Her rape by Trigger is not portrayed condemningly, as if somehow her lifestyle caused it.  Every gesture and movement by Hopkins captures the horror of what happened. Her ghost-like stare following the incident, when she's in the car with Trigger, is rather devastating.  It's an excellent performance.  The film makes quite clear Temple Drake was the victim.  I have to agree with Sister Rose Pacatte in her introduction to the picture, that Temple Drake's only crime was for being a woman.    

 

Temple Drake is a powerful film and Hopkins give a great performance.    As for the rape by Trigger and how they even came to the point where he brings her to that flop house;   yea,  the way the screenplay is written and the scenes directed,  makes the film very neutral as it relates to what the primary cause is.     Trigger makes it clear that she isn't being forced into anything,  but since she doesn't really respond I find what he says hard to believe.    So while later scenes makes it clear Drake was the victim, it is still difficult to determine how much of her own actions are responsible for her being a victim in the eyes of the screenwriter and director.



#5 cinemaspeak59

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 01:56 PM

The Story of Temple Drake is quite a powerful film.  Miriam Hopkins, early in her career, excelled at playing the high society, wealthy party girl the papers loved writing about.  Her rape by Trigger is not portrayed condemningly, as if somehow her lifestyle caused it.  Every gesture and movement by Hopkins captures the horror of what happened. Her ghost-like stare following the incident, when she's in the car with Trigger, is rather devastating.  It's an excellent performance.  The film makes quite clear Temple Drake was the victim.  I have to agree with Sister Rose Pacatte in her introduction to the picture, that Temple Drake's only crime was for being a woman.    






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