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Interesting Actors on Classic TV Westerms


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#21 rayban

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 08:40 PM

A real surprise:  Mary Tyler Moore in an episode of Bronco this week-end.  I'd never seen her in a Western before.

 

Bronco is a foreman for a bombastic Texas cattleman, a legend in his own mind.  We finds an Austrian couple fleeing Mexico after the fall of Maximilian fighting off bandits and lets them stay over night at the ranch.  When the owner's temper runs off the cook and butler, they pitch in and are offered work which they accept.  Bronco soon learns that they are not servants but nobility trying to return to Europe with 5 million in gold they want to give to Franz Joseph.  France wants it for Louis Napoleon and the bandits just want it.  The young Count is treated badly by the ranch hands until he stands up to them and gains the love of the rancher's daughter who is played by MTM.  The Countess reminds the Frenchman after the gold that they helped America become free and quotes the Declaration of Independence to him then says living here might be the best thing for her son and her.  They help fight off the bandits and the rancher decides to marry the Countess.  We're left with the idea there's a double wedding. 

 

Mary is feisty and feminine at home on the range in pants as well as a dress at an elegant table.  She stands up to her father's tantrums and when she wants something-the young count-goes after him (she doesn't know that he is at first).

 

An interesting episode of this show.      

Interesting, I'd never heard of this series.

 

Who played Bronco?


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#22 wouldbestar

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 07:49 PM

A real surprise:  Mary Tyler Moore in an episode of Bronco this week-end.  I'd never seen her in a Western before.

 

Bronco is a foreman for a bombastic Texas cattleman, a legend in his own mind.  We finds an Austrian couple fleeing Mexico after the fall of Maximilian fighting off bandits and lets them stay over night at the ranch.  When the owner's temper runs off the cook and butler, they pitch in and are offered work which they accept.  Bronco soon learns that they are not servants but nobility trying to return to Europe with 5 million in gold they want to give to Franz Joseph.  France wants it for Louis Napoleon and the bandits just want it.  The young Count is treated badly by the ranch hands until he stands up to them and gains the love of the rancher's daughter who is played by MTM.  The Countess reminds the Frenchman after the gold that they helped America become free and quotes the Declaration of Independence to him then says living here might be the best thing for her son and her.  They help fight off the bandits and the rancher decides to marry the Countess.  We're left with the idea there's a double wedding. 

 

Mary is feisty and feminine at home on the range in pants as well as a dress at an elegant table.  She stands up to her father's tantrums and when she wants something-the young count-goes after him (she doesn't know that he is at first).

 

An interesting episode of this show.      


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#23 rayban

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 03:12 PM

Sounds interesting. I haven't seen that particular episode. Bruce Dern was always excellent at playing scum-of-the-earth types.

Yes, he is 100% SCUM.

 

He was like something that had come out from under a rock.

 

Doc meets Homer Bonney, a little boy who is scared out of his wits -

 

01.jpg


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#24 TopBilled

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 11:46 AM

Yesterday, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", there was a stunning episode about a child, who was powerfully played by Pat Cardi (sp?), who was driven half-mad by the man who had killed his father and then wanted to kill him.

 

Bruce Dern played this madman quite convincing.

 

And he treated his two young sons like pieces of garbage.

 

Only "Gunsmoke" could have given us such a strikingly well-written episode.

 

I don't know little Pat Cardi, but I will never forget him.

 

Sounds interesting. I haven't seen that particular episode. Bruce Dern was always excellent at playing scum-of-the-earth types.


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#25 rayban

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 10:40 AM

Yesterday, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", there was a stunning episode about a child, who was powerfully played by Pat Cardi (sp?), who was driven half-mad by the man who had killed his father and then wanted to kill him.

 

Bruce Dern played this madman quite convincing.

 

And he treated his two young sons like pieces of garbage.

 

Only "Gunsmoke" could have given us such a strikingly well-written episode.

 

I don't know little Pat Cardi, but I will never forget him.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#26 rayban

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Posted 13 November 2016 - 08:28 PM

Today, on INSP, there was an interesting episode of "The Virginian", which was spilling over with subtext.

 

It was called "The Road To Laramie".

 

It concerned an obviously "gay couple", who were played nicely by Leslie Nielsen and Berkley Harris (sp.?), who were depraved and homicidial and were in trouble with the townsmen.

 

The townsmen wanted to lynch them and rightly so.

 

Human life meant nothing to them.

 

Also, Emmet (Clu Galagher) had just become the town sheriff, because the two crazies had killed him in the jail.

 

A bar girl, who was interested in Emmet, was seriously pursuing him, because she was hoping that he would be able to do the right thing.

 

Clu Galagher's performance showed that he had absolutely no interest in the woman.

 

In fact, his performance bordered on that of a man with a very bad taste in his mouth.

 

It is so, so interesting what these shows, under the cloak of a seemingly conventional storyline, could actually get away with.

 

Two men, who were gay and homicidial and rode on one horse with an umbrella.

 

And a closeted gay man who was so troubled by the attentions of a persistent woman.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#27 rayban

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 11:06 AM

Today, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", an absolutely gripping episode about a young Indian who became obsessed with killing the man (Neville Brand) who had murdered his father and sister.

 

The young Indian was played - beautifully - by Teno Pollick - and nearly in the nude, too.

 

Teno Pollick was one of the more serious loves in Tony Perkins' life.

 

Teno was extremely protective of his relationship with Tony and could become easily jealous of any looming liasions.

 

Tony's mother, who liked Teno, promised to leave him a great deal of money in her will.

 

It is generally believed that she was trying to keep Teno in line.

 

But, when she died, she left Teno nothing.

 

He felt very betrayed by Tony's mother.

 

Anyway, Teno was memorable in this "Gunsmoke" episode.

Sadly, Teno Pollick committed suicide at the age of 61.

 

He worked on the stage and in TV.

 

He even did an Off-Broadway play, "Steambath", that was directed by his lover, Tony Perkins.  


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#28 rayban

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 06:21 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", an absolutely gripping episode about a young Indian who became obsessed with killing the man (Neville Brand) who had murdered his father and sister.

 

The young Indian was played - beautifully - by Teno Pollick - and nearly in the nude, too.

 

Teno Pollick was one of the more serious loves in Tony Perkins' life.

 

Teno was extremely protective of his relationship with Tony and could become easily jealous of any looming liasions.

 

Tony's mother, who liked Teno, promised to leave him a great deal of money in her will.

 

It is generally believed that she was trying to keep Teno in line.

 

But, when she died, she left Teno nothing.

 

He felt very betrayed by Tony's mother.

 

Anyway, Teno was memorable in this "Gunsmoke" episode.

 

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#29 rayban

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 10:44 AM

I was speaking to Jarrod about the lack of any overt sex on this show.

 

Jarrod brought up the topic of Standards and Practices at the time of "Gunsmoke".

 

So, it is very interesting to me that Roger Ewing (as Thaddeus or Thad) is developed - quite openly - as a "male virgin".

 

It probably could not have happened on any other show.

 

But Ewing's "virginity" is very appealing.

 

I am not being negative about it.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#30 rayban

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 06:54 PM

It seems Roger Ewing didn't do much acting after his semi-regular role on Gunsmoke. IMDb says he retired and became a photographer, and now dabbles in politics in California. He turned 74 this year.

 

 

roger-ewing14.jpg

He was, to put it simply, a great beauty!

 

cas-thad.jpg

 

 


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#31 LawrenceA

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 04:31 PM

It seems Roger Ewing didn't do much acting after his semi-regular role on Gunsmoke. IMDb says he retired and became a photographer, and now dabbles in politics in California. He turned 74 this year.

 

 

roger-ewing14.jpg


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#32 rayban

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 02:48 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "Gunsmoke", there was an extraordinarily beautiful young actor by the name of Roger Ewing, who looked so much like James Arness that I am wondering if he actually was the son of James Arness.

 

Would anybody know?

 

Young Mr. Ewing was given superb support by the great character actor, Jack Elam, who was such a despicable human being that he seemed to have "a warning sign" on him.

 

And it looks like Mr. Ewing's character,  Thaddeus, is going to become a regular.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#33 rayban

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 02:21 PM

Today, on MeTV, on another "Gunsmoke" episode, Ben Cooper returned as - Breck Taylor, I believe.

 

He shared the episode with Ken Curtis - as Festus, right?

 

They became involved in what appeared to be a "bushwacking" case - but, which turned out to be something else entirely.

 

Anyway, Breck and Festus caught the supposed criminals, brought them back to Dodge City and had to contend with a lynching mob.

 

Ben Cooper and Ken Curtis worked very well together, I thought, because the two of them are so very different from each other.

 

Their scenes together were miracles of subtle underplaying.

 

At the end of the episode when Marshal Dillon returned to town, he said to Breck that he thought that Breck was going to keep peace in the town.

 

So, they must have been planning on Breck Taylor as a new kind of law and order in Dodge City.

 

Ben Cooper was such an engaging performer - well, as I said, he should have become a regular.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#34 rayban

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:58 PM

This was Cooper's first performance as this character.  They did attempt to make him a cast regular but after a half-dozen episodes he just hadn't meshed with the show and was gone.  Cooper was/is a fine actor; it was "just one of those things" that didn't work out. 

What a shame, Ben Cooper was such an engaging performer.

 

Of course, he was lot more educated than anybody in Dodge City.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#35 wouldbestar

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 05:43 PM

Today, on MeTV, there was an intense episode of "Gunsmoke", which featured an engaging performance from Ben Cooper, who played a young graduate of a fancy law school from back East, who objected to Marshal Dillon's refusal to respect the rights of Dodge City's residents.

 

He was representing a man who was obviously no-good and proved it by robbing Miss Kitty and then kidnapping her.

 

He came to realize that life in the West did not correspond to life in the East.

 

Marshal Dillon was very tolerant of him and, at times, even amused by the young man.

 

James Arness and Ben Cooper were a memorable duo.

 

Too bad, that the character wasn't incorporated into the town's populace.

 

This was Cooper's first performance as this character.  They did attempt to make him a cast regular but after a half-dozen episodes he just hadn't meshed with the show and was gone.  Cooper was/is a fine actor; it was "just one of those things" that didn't work out. 


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#36 rayban

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 02:25 PM

I don't really care for "Wagon Train".

 

But today's episode had an interesting performance from Ann Blyth as a down-on-her-luck daughter, who was searching for her famous mother who had abandoned her a long, long time ago.

 

Interestingly, the mother, who wanted nothing to do with the daughter, was also played by Ann Blyth.

 

Miss Blyth, who had a lovely singing voice, got to sing two songs,too.

 

She had terrific support from Ward Bond, who wanted to bring the daughter and mother together.

 

   


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#37 rayban

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 01:23 PM

Today, on MeTV, there was an intense episode of "Gunsmoke", which featured an engaging performance from Ben Cooper, who played a young graduate of a fancy law school from back East, who objected to Marshal Dillon's refusal to respect the rights of Dodge City's residents.

 

He was representing a man who was obviously no-good and proved it by robbing Miss Kitty and then kidnapping her.

 

He came to realize that life in the West did not correspond to life in the East.

 

Marshal Dillon was very tolerant of him and, at times, even amused by the young man.

 

James Arness and Ben Cooper were a memorable duo.

 

Too bad, that the character wasn't incorporated into the town's populace.

 

 

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#38 TopBilled

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 04:35 PM

Today, on MeTV, an episode of "Gunsmoke" that starred Jean Arthur, Scott Marlowe and Milburn Stone in a frenzied tale of a mother who was trying to re-connect with her son.

 

The problem here was that the son was an outlaw - and his wife died in childbirth and the son didn't want the baby.

 

The three actors made the most of their material.

 

The more that I watch episodes of "Gunsmoke", the more that I realize what an exceptional TV series it was.

 

Yes...there's a reason it ran for 20 years. I think the episode you mentioned was the first western Jean Arthur had made in over ten years, since SHANE. A very big deal was made about her guest appearance.


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#39 rayban

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 02:55 PM

Today, on MeTV, an episode of "Gunsmoke" that starred Jean Arthur, Scott Marlowe and Milburn Stone in a frenzied tale of a mother who was trying to re-connect with her son.

 

The problem here was that the son was an outlaw - and his wife died in childbirth and the son didn't want the baby.

 

The three actors made the most of their material.

 

The more that I watch episodes of "Gunsmoke", the more that I realize what an exceptional TV series it was.

 

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#40 rayban

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 10:12 AM

Yesterday, I tuned into the end of a "Wagon Train", which seemed to be a Western version of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice".

 

Then, the cast list came on - and buried in the supporting cast list was the name - Claude Jarman.

 

If only I hadn't missed this one - and I did not know that he dropped "Jr.".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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