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Forgotten Westerns!


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#21 Terrence1

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 10:32 AM

TopBilled, I like your comments about Randolph Scott.  You're right--he fit the Western genre so perfectly.  And he made some good ones!  One of my favorites is "Comanche Station" with the beautiful Nancy Gates.  It's interesting, because he had to fight his feelings for Nancy, since she was married.  A great story line, and so believable.

 

Terrence.


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#22 TopBilled

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 08:40 AM

Scott like the great Joel McCrea decided to stick to Westerns in the late 40's and 50's. Scott had done Westerns in the early 1930's along with many other genre's, but there was something about Westerns that was a good fit for both the wonderful stars. One of Scott's best oaters was the 1941 "Western Union" directed by Fritz Lang. A beautiful Technicolor film from 20th Century Fox.If you're a fan of Scott, make sure you watch his final film "Ride the High Country" with Joel McCrea in one of his last films also. Directed by Sam Peckinpah it's pre "Wild Bunch" and a beautifully acted Western with great performances by 2 great Western stars..Make sure you get the Scott/Budd Boetticher box set...

 

RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY tends to be highly rated by most fans of the actors and the genre. It airs frequently on TCM so one won't have trouble finding it. 

 

I'm glad you mentioned the often overlooked WESTERN UNION. It turns up occasionally on Encore Westerns and Retroplex. Definitely a great picture for the reasons you mentioned above, plus it has Robert Young (on loan out from MGM) making a rare western appearance.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#23 rayban

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 07:49 AM

Scott like the great Joel McCrea decided to stick to Westerns in the late 40's and 50's. Scott had done Westerns in the early 1930's along with many other genre's, but there was something about Westerns that was a good fit for both the wonderful stars. One of Scott's best oaters was the 1941 "Western Union" directed by Fritz Lang. A beautiful Technicolor film from 20th Century Fox.If you're a fan of Scott, make sure you watch his final film "Ride the High Country" with Joel McCrea in one of his last films also. Directed by Sam Peckinpah it's pre "Wild Bunch" and a beautifully acted Western with great performances by 2 great Western stars..Make sure you get the Scott/Budd Boetticher box set...

Randolph Scott & Budd Boetticher - from everything that I've read, a match made in heaven.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#24 fredbaetz

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 01:43 AM

I've just bought a collection of Randolph Scott westerns.

 

I do not really know his work in the Western genre. 

Scott like the great Joel McCrea decided to stick to Westerns in the late 40's and 50's. Scott had done Westerns in the early 1930's along with many other genre's, but there was something about Westerns that was a good fit for both the wonderful stars. One of Scott's best oaters was the 1941 "Western Union" directed by Fritz Lang. A beautiful Technicolor film from 20th Century Fox.If you're a fan of Scott, make sure you watch his final film "Ride the High Country" with Joel McCrea in one of his last films also. Directed by Sam Peckinpah it's pre "Wild Bunch" and a beautifully acted Western with great performances by 2 great Western stars..Make sure you get the Scott/Budd Boetticher box set...


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#25 TopBilled

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 01:30 PM

Jarrod, I liked Randolph Scott so much in "Hangman's Knot" that I really look forward to his other films in the collection

 

That, and, of course, the fact that he rode off with Claude Jarman, Jr. at the end of the film.

 

He certainly made a lot of westerns...so you will have many great films to see. 


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#26 rayban

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 01:19 PM

It's a coincidence you make this comment Ray...yesterday I purchased two collections of westerns on DVD. I bought packs of Paramount and Universal westerns, since they do not air on TCM and are showing up less frequently on the Encore Westerns channel and Retroplex. 

 

One of the packs has ALBUQUERQUE, a Randolph Scott western he did at Paramount in the late 40s. 

Jarrod, I liked Randolph Scott so much in "Hangman's Knot" that I really look forward to his other films in the collection

 

That, and, of course, the fact that he rode off with Claude Jarman, Jr. at the end of the film.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#27 TopBilled

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 12:53 PM

I've just bought a collection of Randolph Scott westerns.

 

I do not really know his work in the Western genre. 

 

It's a coincidence you make this comment Ray...yesterday I purchased two collections of westerns on DVD. I bought packs of Paramount and Universal westerns, since they do not air on TCM and are showing up less frequently on the Encore Westerns channel and Retroplex. 

 

One of the packs has ALBUQUERQUE, a Randolph Scott western he did at Paramount in the late 40s. 


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#28 rayban

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 10:05 PM

I always liked "Hangman's Knot" very much and thought it was one of Scott's best Westerns and very under rated...Scott did 2 with a young Lee Marvin, the other being the classic "7 Men From Now". John Wayne was to have done it, it was a Batjac production, but Wayne was busy with John Ford's "The Seachers". So he got Scott to star but Scott would do it if they hired Budd Boetticher to direct.. It became a classic Scott Western....

I've just bought a collection of Randolph Scott westerns.

 

I do not really know his work in the Western genre. 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#29 fredbaetz

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 06:07 PM

fredbaetz, thank you so much for that memory about Claude Jarman, Jr., I never tire of watching him in any of his movies - my most recent experience being both Randolph Scott and Claude Jarman, Jr. in "Hangman's Knot".

I always liked "Hangman's Knot" very much and thought it was one of Scott's best Westerns and very under rated...Scott did 2 with a young Lee Marvin, the other being the classic "7 Men From Now". John Wayne was to have done it, it was a Batjac production, but Wayne was busy with John Ford's "The Seachers". So he got Scott to star but Scott would do it if they hired Budd Boetticher to direct.. It became a classic Scott Western....


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#30 rayban

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Posted 26 August 2016 - 07:17 AM

I moved to the San Francisco bay area in 1967 to work as staff cameraman for a remote outfit called Tel-West Productions in Redwood City. it was a 6 camera remote truck the same as the networks used. In fact our first job was for Wide World of Sports in Seattle on Thanksgiving Day covering a football game. The President of Tel-west was Claude Jarman Jr . He was working as PR for John Hancock Ins. at the time and president of the San Francisco Film Festival. I found him to be a charming, friendly and outgoing person. He looked almost the same as when he did "The yearling" only about 6' 3'' at the time. I worked there a year and a half and never had any problems, we talked once in a while when he stopped by the studios in Redwood City, mostly about movies. When i left to go to work in L.A. at ABC Hollywood, I went to his offices to hand in my notice. He walked with me to the door and shook my hand, thanked me for the work i did for the company.....

fredbaetz, thank you so much for that memory about Claude Jarman, Jr., I never tire of watching him in any of his movies - my most recent experience being both Randolph Scott and Claude Jarman, Jr. in "Hangman's Knot".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#31 TopBilled

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 09:08 AM

I moved to the San Francisco bay area in 1967 to work as staff cameraman for a remote outfit called Tel-West Productions in Redwood City. it was a 6 camera remote truck the same as the networks used. In fact our first job was for Wide World of Sports in Seattle on Thanksgiving Day covering a football game. The President of Tel-west was Claude Jarman Jr . He was working as PR for John Hancock Ins. at the time and president of the San Francisco Film Festival. I found him to be a charming, friendly and outgoing person. He looked almost the same as when he did "The yearling" only about 6' 3'' at the time. I worked there a year and a half and never had any problems, we talked once in a while when he stopped by the studios in Redwood City, mostly about movies. When i left to go to work in L.A. at ABC Hollywood, I went to his offices to hand in my notice. He walked with me to the door and shook my hand, thanked me for the work i did for the company.....

 

Such a great comment. Thanks for sharing. A week ago I watched RIO GRANDE, and I thought he was just perfect as the son of John Wayne & Maureen O'Hara. His film career ended too soon.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#32 fredbaetz

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 02:09 AM

I moved to the San Francisco bay area in 1967 to work as staff cameraman for a remote outfit called Tel-West Productions in Redwood City. it was a 6 camera remote truck the same as the networks used. In fact our first job was for Wide World of Sports in Seattle on Thanksgiving Day covering a football game. The President of Tel-west was Claude Jarman Jr . He was working as PR for John Hancock Ins. at the time and president of the San Francisco Film Festival. I found him to be a charming, friendly and outgoing person. He looked almost the same as when he did "The yearling" only about 6' 3'' at the time. I worked there a year and a half and never had any problems, we talked once in a while when he stopped by the studios in Redwood City, mostly about movies. When i left to go to work in L.A. at ABC Hollywood, I went to his offices to hand in my notice. He walked with me to the door and shook my hand, thanked me for the work i did for the company.....


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#33 Classic movie fan

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Posted 20 August 2016 - 03:57 PM

Fighting Caravans was a 1931 time that starred Gary Cooper in the title role of Clint Belmet. The film is about a young Frontier Scout who helps guide a freight wagon train across the country,fighting off Indians and evil traders,while his two crusty companions try to save him from falling in love.
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" Nobody's Perfect"

#34 rayban

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 10:35 PM

"Hangman's Knot" is one of Randolph Scott's many Westerns for Columbia Pictures.

 

It has an extraordinary cast - Randolph Scott, of course, Donna Reed, Claude Jarman, Jr., Lee Marvin, Richard Denning, Jeanette Nolan and a lot of fine character actors like Frank Faylen.

 

It's a very tight, lean Western about a group of Confederate soldiers who are sent off to steal a

Yankee gold shipment - and these guys do it, too, and then are told that the war has been over for a month.

 

While they realize that they would now be branded criminals - and while they are hunted down by greedy bad men who are pretending to be a posse - they hole up at a way station which literally becomes a hell on earth for them.

 

It reminds me a bit of Jean Paul Sartre's "No Exit" - there really isn't any place to go and people don't do well together in closed spaces.

 

The most interesting relationship in the film is the one between Randolph Scott and Claude Jarman, Jr. - Jarman, Jr. is a very inexperienced kid, he's never really killed anybody before - and Scott takes this kid under his wing and tries to protect him from the god-awful environment.

 

When Jarman, Jr. is forced to kill Marvin's totally depraved character, it is really a moment of startling, deep drama.

 

In fact, Jarman, Jr. doesn't even seem capable of processing what he has just done.

 

There's a lot of violence, but Randolph Scott and Claude Jarman, Jr. do survive.

 

And, interestingly enough, they ride off - together.

 

A deep relationship has been forged.

 

The director, Roy Huggins, I believe, does a very credible job of creating a hell on earth, which does not seem to have an escape for anybody.

 

It's more than threatening, it's scary - and the fact that Scott and Jarman, Jr. survive is a very surprising revelation.

 

Matt and Jaime - a journey that seems like the beginning of the end - 

 

  1987-2.jpg


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#35 rayban

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 02:46 PM

And Jarman did get a chance to play a more adult character in the MGM western THE OUTRIDERS with Joel McCrea.

He was such an extraordinary child actor - in "The Sun Is Up", opposite Jeanette MacDonald, he played an orphan who stole her heart - and rightly so.

 

In "Roughshod", the fact that he loves his brother (Robert Sterling) so is almost equivalent to giving Sterling some sort of sacred halo.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#36 TopBilled

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 12:46 PM

Claude Jarman, Jr. would be going on to make one of his greatest films for MGM, "Intruder In The Dust" (1949)  and one of his greatest films for Republic - playing John Wayne's lost son - in "Rio Grande" (1950).

And Jarman did get a chance to play a more adult character in the MGM western THE OUTRIDERS with Joel McCrea.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#37 rayban

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 12:31 PM

Claude Jarman, Jr. would be going on to make one of his greatest films for MGM, "Intruder In The Dust" (1949)  and one of his greatest films for Republic - playing John Wayne's lost son - in "Rio Grande" (1950).


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#38 TopBilled

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 10:46 AM

ROUGHSHOD has aired on TCM-- but not very often. As an RKO picture (not a Republic western) it is in the TCM/Turner library.

 

Jarman and Sterling were loaned out by MGM to RKO-- and both their film careers didn't last much longer. Grahame's contract was shared by RKO and MGM, and she would have an Oscar in the near future.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#39 rayban

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 10:20 AM

I saw an excellent Western yesterday that was a Republic Pictures Presentation.

 

"Roughshod" was released by RKO and was made in 1949.

 

It had a terrific cast - Robert Sterling, Claude Jarman, Jr., Gloria Grahame and John Ireland.

 

It also had a terrific supporting cast.

 

It concerned a struggling cowpoke (Sterling) and his brother (Jarman, Jr.) who were traveling to set up a new farm and bringing along with them a lot of horses for the farm.

 

Along the way, Sterling learned that he was being hunted by an escaped convict (Ireland) and his fellow escapees for a past encounter that went wrong and sent Ireland to jail.

 

Sterling also came to the aid of four down-and-out dance hall hostesses who had been tossed out of town and were trying - unsuccessfully - to travel on their own.

 

Although this film had all the trappings of the usual Western, it was essentially a "love story" between Sterling and Grahame, who were a very unlikely pair of "lovers".

 

He really regarded her as a great inconvenience and she was in love with her grit and independence.

 

There was also another "love story" between Sterling and Jarman, Jr., who did obviously worship his brother and hoped for a romance between him and Grahame.

 

Of course, everything worked out in the end, but it did look awfully grim for the longest time.

 

An unusual Western, in which two very different kinds of love - forbidden love and brotherly love - came to a really emotional head and smashed hard against each other.

 

Mark Robson directed the film - rather perceptively, too.

 

roughshod.jpg?w=474


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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