skimpole

Members
  • Content Count

    2,832
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About skimpole

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1990. Here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Nicholas Pileggi, Martin Scorcese, Goodfellas, based on the book Wiseguy by Pileggi Nicholas Kazan, Reversal of Fortune, based on the book of the same name by Alan Dershowitz Charles S. Haas, Gremlins 2: the New Batch, sequel to the movie Gremlins William Harrison, Bob Rafelson, Mountains of the Moon, based on the novel Burton and Speke by Harrison. Gianni Amelio, Vincenzo Cerami, Alessandro Sermoneta, Open Doors, based on the novel of the same name by Leonardo Sciascia And here is Best Original Screenplay: Diane Kurys, Alain Le Henry, C’est la Vie/La Baules-Les-Pins Bruce Joel Rubin, Jacob’s Ladder Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, Mller’s Crossing Akira Kurosawa, Dreams Luc Besson, La Femme Nikita I have not seen Avalon, Green Card (original)
  2. theyshootpictures.com top 1000 movies 1974 Ali: Fear Eats the Soul Rainer Werner Fassbinder, West Germany #138 Celine and Julie Go Boating Jacques Rivette, France #178 The Enigma of Kasper Hauser Werner Herzog, West Germany #498 The Phantom of Liberty Luis Bunuel, France #504 Alice in the Cities Wim Wenders, West Germany #576 Lancelot du Lac Robert Bresson, France #634 Edvard Munch Peter Watkins, Sweden #672 We All Loved Each Other So Very Much Ettore Scola, Italy #801 Arabian Nights Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italy #845 My Little Loves Jean Eustache, France #867 Jonathan Rosenbaum's top 1000 movies Alice in the Cities Wim Wenders, West Germany Benilde or the Virgin Mother Manoel de Oliveira, Portugal *Celine and Julie Go Boating Jacques Rivette, France La Guele Ouverte Maurice Pialat, France Lancelot du Lac Robert Bresson, France Part-Time Work of a Domestic Slave Alexander Kluge, West Germany The Phantom of Liberty Luis Bunuel, France Reason, Debate, and a Story Ritwak Ghitak, India Stavisky Alain Resnais, France The Traveler Abbas Kiarostami, Iran An asterisk (*) means the movie is one of Rosenbaum's top 100 movies. Note that dates are not exact.
  3. Wikipedia says this movie was shot in English, though there is a dubbed Italian version. That makes sense, since Lancaster is the key character, and the movie consists of him talking with the other characters. Had it been considered a foreign language film, it would have been #7 on my list.
  4. skimpole

    LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...

    Last week I saw four movies. Valmont is beautifully shot with lovely set decoration and charming performances. Had Dangerous Liaisons not appeared a year earlier, and had there not been a prominent theatrical adaptation of the original novel earlier that year, people would undoubtedly have liked it much more. However, there were both such things, leading one to think why anyone would produce a version defined by having nicer protagonists. Seriously, what's the point? As such, the cast ultimately pales besides Dangerous Liaisons: Annette Bening acquits herself best against Glen Close, while Meg Tilly and Fairuza Balk are least impressive against Michelle Pfeiffer and Uma Thurman. Settling into the sixth Mission Impossible movie, it occurred to me that I had forgotten the subtitle (Fallout), as well as the subtitle to the previous movie (Rogue Nation), and had forgotten most of that movie except Tom Cruise hanging on to a flying plane, and an elaborate scene where he has to get somewhere or deactivate something while running the risk of drowning. As it turns out, this movie is a bit more memorable: there's an elaborate, and very threatening fight in a bathroom near the beginning. There's also an elaborate chase involving helicopters over the Himalayas as a climax, complicated by the fact that Cruise can't simply kill the villain since he has to take the detonator he's carrying. Also there is an interesting, somewhat over elaborate car chase in Paris for the middle which is OK if not brilliant. Once again, the plot involves Ethan Hunt being accused, or framed of involvement in a terrorist conspiracy, and only way he can clear his name involves giving the terrorists what they want. Also this plans goes badly wrong, and Hunt has to find a way to solve it. I know variations of this happened in movies 1 and 4, and if I cared enough about the plots, it may have happened in 2, 3 and 5. At least this time the government officials who criticize Hunt are even more horribly compromised. Something New is a silent movie with only one joke. But it is a surprisingly good joke and sustained over the 55 minutes it lasts. Basically Nell Shipman, director and lead actress, is kidnapped by Mexican bandits. And so the hero comes to rescue him (which he eventually does) and they (eventually) get away. The joke is that he does this by car, and he's doing this in a rocky, mountainous area where you'd have to be an utter idiot to drive. Given the reliability, or the lack of them, of 1920 automobiles, any drivers watching the film in its first run must have been terrified as how the car crawls over the landscape, thinking every minute the suspension will break. Shipman also shows some initiative as the movie goes on. I can imagine the conversation studio heads had when developing Roman J. Israel Esq: "It has Denzel Washington concerned about the African-American community." "We've done that." "He's also a lawyer concerned about losing his soul." "We've also done that." "But this time he has Asberger's Syndrome." "All right I admit we haven't done that. But should we bother?" As it happens the issues raised are vaguely and shallowly presented, and the thriller that the movie eventually gets around to doesn't amount to much. True, the director of Michael Clayton liked it. But since the directors of the two movies are brothers, people who don't have to share Thanksgiving dinner with them can reasonably be more skeptical.
  5. 1. Celine and Julie Go Boating Jacques Rivette, France 2. The Enigma of Kasper Hauser Werner Herzog, West Germany 3. The Phantom of Liberty Luis Bunuel, France/Italy 4. Scenes from a Marriage Ingmar Bergman, Sweden 5. My Little Loves Jean Eustache, France 6. Alice in the Cities Wim Wenders, West Germany 7. Fear Eats the Soul Rainer Werner Fassbinder, West Germany 8. Arabian Nights Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italy/France 9. Lacombe, Lucien Louis Malle, France 10. Lancelot du Lac Robert Bresson, France 11. The Traveler Abbas Kiarostami, Iran 12. Still Life Sohrab Shahid-Saless, Iran 13. Stavisky Alain Resnais, France/Italy 14. Electra, My Love Miklos Jancso, Hungary
  6. Actually three other women served in the Senate in the second half of the thirties. But the three didn't serve at the same time. They served for terms less than 11 months (1936-1937), five months (1937-1938), and two months (1938-1939). The first two were appointees, the third won a peculiar special election for a two month term.
  7. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1989. Here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Kenneth Branagh, Henry V, based on the play of the same name by William Shakespeare Oliver Stone Ron Kovic, Born on the Fourth of July, based on the autobiography of the same name by Kovic Roger L. Simon, Paul Mazursky, Enemies: A Love Story, based on the novel of the same name by Isaac Bashevis Singer Hayao Miyazaki, Kiki’s Delivery Service, based on the novel of the same name by Eiko Kadano Ron Clements, John Musker, The Little Mermaid, based on the story of the same name by Hans Christian Andersen And here is Best Original Screenplay Woody Allen, Crimes and Misdemeanors Cameron Crowe, Say Anything… Chu T’ien-wen, Wu Nien Jen, A City of Sadness Abbas Kiarostami, Homework Kira Muratova, Aleksandr Chernhyk, Sergei Popov, The Asthenic Syndrome
  8. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1988. Here is Best Original Screenplay: John Cleese, Charles Crichton, A Fish Called Wanda Marcel Ophuls, Hotel Terminus Hayao Miyazakai, My Neighbor Totoro Terence Davies, Distant Voices, Still Lives Theo Angelopoulos, Tonino Guerra, Thanassis Valtinos, Landscape in the Mist And here is Best Adapted Screenplay: George Sluizer, Tim Krabbe, The Vanishing, based on Krabbe's novel The Golden Egg Isao Takahata, The Grave of the Fireflies, based on the short story of the same name by Akiyuki Nasaka Christopher Hampton, Dangerous Liaisons, based on his play Les Liaisons Dangereuses and the novel Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos David Cronenberg, Norman Snider, Dead Ringers, based on the novel Twins by Bari Wood and Jack Geasland Jean-Claude Carriere, Philip Kaufman, The Unbearable Lightness of Being, based on the novel of the same name by Milan Kundera I have not seen Running on Empty (original) or Gorillas in the Mist (adapted)
  9. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1987. Here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Alan Parker, Angel Heart, based on the novel Falling Angel by William Hjortsberg William Goldman, The Princess Bride, based on his novel of the same name Mark Peploe, Bernardo Bertolucci, The Last Emperor, based on the autobiography From Emperor to Citizen: The Autobiography of Aisin-Gioro Pu Yi by Henry Pu Yi Lasse Hallstrom, Reidar Jonsson, Brasse Branstrom, Per Berglund, My Life as a Dog, based on Jonsson's novel of the same name Stanley Kubrick, Michael Herr, Gustav Hasford, Full Metal Jacket, based on Hasford's novel The Short-Timers And here is Best Original Screenplay: John Boorman, Hope and Glory Jeffrey Boam, Chip Proser, Innerspace Abbas Kiarostami, Where is the Friend's Home Woody Allen, Radio Days David Mamet, House of Games
  10. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1986. Here is Best Original Screenplay: Eric Rohmer, Marie Riviere, The Green Ray/Summer David Lynch, Blue Velvet Andrei Tarkovsky, The Sacrifice Richard Fire, John McNaughton, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer Robert Bolt, The Mission And here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Richard Burridge, Absolute Beginners, based on the novel of the same name by Colin MacInnes James Cameron, Aliens, sequel to the movie Alien, directed by Ridley Scott Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, A Room with a View, based on the novel of the same name by E.M. Forster Charles Edward Pogue, David Cronenberg, The Fly, remake of the movie The Fly directed by Kurt Neumann Bruce A. Evans, Raymond Gideon, Stand by Me, based on the novella "The Body" by Stephen King I have not seen Crocodile Dundee, My Beautiful Laundrette (original), or Crimes of the Heart (adapted)
  11. theyshootpictures.com top 1000 movies 1973 Amarcord Federico Fellini, Italy #72 The Spirit of the Beehive Victor Erice, Spain #107 La Maman et la Putain Jean Eustarche, France #111 Touki Bouki Djibril Diop Mambety, Senegal #291 Scenes from a Marriage Ingmar Bergman, Sweden #409 Day for Night Francois Truffaut, France #411 The Holy Mountain Alejandro Jodorowsky, Mexico #744 Ludwig Luchino Visconti, Italy #803 Jonathan Rosenbaum's top 1000 movies Martha Rainer Werner Fassbinder, West Germany The Mongols Parviz Kimiavi, Iran La Maman et la Putain Jean Eustache, France Narita: Heta Village Shinsuke Ogawa, Japan Nathalie Granger Marguerite Duras, France *Parade Jacques Tati, France Salome Carmelo Bene, Italy Touki Bouki Djibril Diop Mambety, Senegal An asterisk (*) means the film is one of Rosenbaum's top 100 movies. Note that dates are not exact.
  12. skimpole

    LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...

    I saw four movies last week. BlacKkKlansman is an interesting and in many ways serviceable Spike Lee joint about the first black police officer in his Colorado city who decides to investigate the Klan. Having accidentally given his real name to the man he telephoned he has to convince a Jewish colleague to impersonate him as part of the investigation. Adam Driver, as the colleague, does a good job as does Jasper Paakkonen as the most sinister of the Klansmen and Topher Grace as David Duke. There's a certain weakness of rhetoric, with Stokely Carmichael appearing giving a speech doing his trademark more charisma than brains. Where are my Children? may have been directed by a woman and an argument for contraception. But it doesn't wear well a century later, what with its seduced and abandoned subplot, belief that women have abortion for frivolous reasons and obvious name (Malfit as the abortionist). Peking Opera Blues is one of the more successful action films of 1986, with the plot of three women in Republican China trying to help the national good over warlord factions. It's expertly edited, well paced and shot, notwithstanding the lack of acrobatics later seen in Once Upon a Time in China. It also does well with the limitations put upon it. Chinese cinema at the time, whether Communist or non-communist, was fairly puritan in its tone. So the fact that two men who hang around and help the two women don't become love interests actually works in giving the women more autonomy. (The movie ends with the five riding off in different directions.) The Unknown Girl is another fine Dardenne brothers drama about the Belgian precariat, if not quite up to the high standards as their previous two films. In this case a doctor ignores a buzz at her clinic door an hour after closing, only to find out soon after that the inquirer was the title character in question, and she died violently shortly afterwards. Adele Haenel gives an especially good performance as the doctor as she tries to find out who the victim was.
  13. 1. The Spirit of the Beehive Victor Erice, Spain 2. La Maman et la Putain Jean Eustace, France 3. Day for Night Francois Truffaut, France 4. State of Siege Constantin Costa-Gavras, France 5. A River Called Titas Ritwik Ghatak, India 6. Ludwig Luchino Visconti, Italy/France/West Germany
  14. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1985. Here is Best Original Screenplay: Terry Gilliam, Tom Stoppard, Charles McKeown, Brazil Claude Lanzmann, Shoah Robert Zemeckis, Bob Gale, Back to the Future Agnes Varda, Vagabond Juzo Itami, Tampopo And here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Elem Klimov, Ales Adamovich, Come and See, based on Adamovich's novel I am from the Fiery Village Akira Kurosawa, Hideo Oguni, Masoto Ide, Ran, based on the play King Lear by William Shakespeare Jonathan Lynn, Clue, based on the board game invented by Anthony E. Pratt Kurt Luedtke, Out of Africa, based on on the memoir by Isak Dinesen and the books Silence Will Speak by Errol Trzebinski and Isak Dinesen: The Life of a Storyteller by Judith Thurman Andrew Bergman, Fletch, based on the novel of the same name by Gregory Mcdonald
  15. skimpole

    Your favorite adapted/original screenplay

    Now it's 1984. Here is Best Original Screenplay: Brian Grazer, Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel, Bruce Jay Friedman, Splash L.M. Kit Carson, Sam Shepard, Paris, Texas Leonordo Benvenuti, Piero De Benardi, Enrico Medioli, Franco Arcali, Franco Ferrini, Sergio Leone, Once Upon a Time in America William Kennedy, Francis Ford Coppola, The Cotton Club Woody Allen, Broadway Danny Rose And here is Best Adapted Screenplay: Phil Alden Robinson, Henry Olek, All of Me, based on the novel Me Too by Edwin Davis Paul Mommertz, The Wannsee Conference, based on the original protocols Vaja Gigashvili, The Legend of Suram Fortress, based on the novella Tsiskan by Daniel Chonkadze Bruce Robinson, The Killing Fields, based on the article "The Death and Life of Dith Pran," by Sydney Schanberg Sandy Kroopf, Jack Behr, Birdy, based on the novel of the same name by William Wharton

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us