Dewey1960

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  1. Time for a first weekend report on *NOT NECESSARILY NOIR* at the Roxie. While the crowds haven't been as huge as this past Spring's program, the audience response, I'm happy to say, has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic. Friday night's opening program of *INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS* (1956) and *THE CREEPING UNKNOWN* (1955) was met with loud approval. One of the risks of programming a film like *BODY SNATCHERS* is that it's a film that has been wildly over-saturated on cable TV and home video. Finding someone who's never seen it would be a challenge, and it was apparent that most of the people in the audience were quite familiar with this truly frightening classic. Folks who have only seen it on their television monitors at home might not realize that it was shot in a wide-screen ratio and looks fantastic on the big screen, ratcheting up the terror and suspense enormously. The co-feature, *THE CREEPING UNKNOWN*, is less known to movie goers and is another film that benefits tremendously from the big screen treatment. All-in-all a perfect way to kick things off. Saturday's program offered up a pair of seldom-revived 60s films. *MIRAGE* (1965), directed by noir stalwart Edward Dmytryk who employs many of the sinister cinematic tricks made popular by Alfred Hitchcock, pitting Gregory Peck against a seemingly unsolvable mystery revolving around a diabolical case of amnesia. Diane Baker co-stars and she's really a sight to behold, her beautiful dark features perfectly suited to Joseph MacDonald's sumptuous black & white cinematography. This one's a winner and the crowd ate it up. The co-feature, *13 WEST STREET* (1962) suffers only by comparison; a somewhat low-key revenge story with Alan Ladd at the sad tail end of his career. It's only periodically interesting, only coming to life near the end as Ladd finally unleashes his rage against the vicious punks who have ransacked his life. The prints on both of these films were spotless and gorgeous! On Sunday (and again tonight) Roxie patrons were given the rare opportunity of seeing one of the most challenging films of the 1960s, Jack Garfein's disturbing *SOMETHING WILD* (1961). Garfein is an interesting fellow and I'm privileged to say that he's become a friend of mine over the past several weeks. When it was announced that this film (as well as the Garfein-directed co-feature *THE STRANGE ONE* (1957)) were to be revived in San Francisco, I received a very warm email from Mr. Garfein thanking me for including his films in our program. Jack, at 80 years old, is still very active in the world of the theater. Back in the late 50s he was credited with founding the West Coast branch of the Actor's Studio and watching his films (especially *SOMETHING WILD* ) is much like a crash course in The Method. Carroll Baker (who was married to Jack at the time) stars along with Ralph Meeker (who at one time understudied for Brando in STREETCAR and eventually took over the role) in a drama about a young college girl who is raped on her way home one night and the curious aftermath of this event. The film is staggeringly real in its refusal to offer up simple answers for complicated questions. Much of it seems to verge on improvisation despite the fact that Eugen Schuftan's incredible cinematography transforms it into a cinematic wonder. The effects are devastating: ordinarily films that are so dominated by performance and content lose sight of the fact that they are first and foremost examples of cinematic art. *SOMETHING WILD* gives us so much more to ponder thanks to its commitment to cinematic excellence. But this would be the last feature film Garfein would ever direct. The film made absolutely no money and angered many in the otherwise sedate Hollywood community who saw this film as an awkward attempt to "Europeanize" the American film industry. Shortly afterward Garfein moved to Paris and London where he founded acting studios which are still thriving today. Just this month he published a wonderful book (from Northwestern University Press) called Life and Acting: Techniques for the Actor. The audience yesterday was understandably mesmerized by the film and honestly, I can't think of another American film from this period that deals so frankly with difficult and adult material. Next month (Sept 18 & 19), Jack will be honored at the Billy Wilder Theater at UCLA with screenings of both these films. I urge any and all Los Angelenos to attend!
  2. Thanks ChiO - You probably don't realize it but you were the biggest reason I got so turned on by Garfein's film *SOMETHING WILD*. Had you not recommended it so highly I might not have checked it out further on TCM. Now it's going up on the big screen and we have you to thank! Maven - your appreciation is greatly appreciated! The Roxie Theater has finally posted the info on this series on their website; here's the link: http://www.roxie.com/events/details.cfm?eventID=EBF108FA-B3AB-EBEE-755ED20AE1239F63
  3. Hey everyone - Next month the Roxie Theater in San Francisco plays host to my latest film series-- *NOT NECESSARILY NOIR!* Two thrilling weeks of dark and disturbing motion picture entertainment featuring films in a variety of unusual genres (horror, science fiction, westerns) as well as films made in COLOR in the years long past the period generally associated with film noir. Here's the line-up: *Friday, August 20* *INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS* (1956) Don Siegel's original version of what is, for many, the ultimate sci-fi noir of the period! *THE CREEPING UNKNOWN* (1956) Val Guest directs this eerie UK horror-scifi-noir hybrid and it's a major creep-fest. Brian Donlevy stars as the enigmatic Professor Quartermass. *Saturday, August 21* *MIRAGE* (1965) Director Edward Dmytryk's wide-screen black & white homage to Hitchcock starring Gregory Peck and Diane Baker. Amnesia noir at its best. Great score by Quincy Jones. *13 WEST STREET* (1962) Unsung Alan Ladd late-model noir. It was his second from last film and he really looks haggard in this. Directed by Philip Leacock. *Sunday & Monday, August 22 & 23* A pair of unjustly ignored films from director Jack Garfein! *THE STRANGE ONE* (1957) Ben Gazzara as a sociopathic military cadet determined to destroy all those around him. Awesome!! *SOMETHING WILD* (1961) Carroll Baker as a rape victim who winds up in a relationship with mentally unstable Ralph Meeker. Incredible! *Tuesday, August 24* *THE DAY OF THE OUTLAW* (1959) Andre DeToth's snowbound western noir stars the iconic Robert Ryan. One of Hollywood's great, forgotten films. *TERROR IN A TEXAS TOWN* (1958) Sterling Hayden stars in Joseph H. Lewis' wholly eccentric western drama. Justice comes at the end of a harpoon! *Wednesday, August 25* *THE SADIST* (1963) Arch Hall, Jr. in one of the most disturbing terror films ever made. Photographed in stunning black & white by Vilmos Zsigmond. *A TOWN HAS TURNED TO DUST* (1958) Rediscovered TV Noir from "Playhouse 90." Written by Rod Serling and directed by John Frankenheimer. Dynamic tale of small-town racial prejudice. William Shatner stands out as the rabid leader of a lynch mob! *Thursday, August 26* *THE FACE BEHIND THE MASK* (1941) Brilliant horror-noir hybrid with Peter Lorre as an idealistic immigrant who becomes a savage criminal after being hideously disfigured in a fire. Evelyn Keyes is in it, too. Directed (with flair) by Robert Florey. *HOUSE OF HORRORS* (1946) This was Rondo Hatton's last film. The actor suffered from the degenerative disease acromegaly and required no make-up. A real oddity. *Friday, August 27* *OBSESSION* (1976) Brian DePalma's odd take on Hitchcock's "Vertigo" starring Cliff Robertson and Genevieve Bujold. Written by Paul Schrader. Score by Bernard Herrmann. *LAST EMBRACE* (1979) Director Jonathan Demme's turn to pay regards to the Master of Suspense. Starring Roy Scheider and Janet Margolin. *Saturday, August 28* *BREATHLESS* (1983) Jim McBride's incredible remake of Godard's new wave trend-setter. Am I the only one who prefers this version? Richard Gere and Valerie Kaprisky star. *ROMEO IS BLEEDING* (1993) Gary Oldman and Lena Olin re-imagine film noir by turning every classical notion on its ear. Peter Medak directs, and how! *Sunday & Monday, August 29 & 30* *BAD LIEUTENANT* (1992) Harvey Keitel as the eponymous, nameless cop in Abel Ferrara's brutal and brilliant tale of redemption. *BLUE COLLAR* (1978) Richard Pryor, Harvey Keitel and Yaphet Kotto in Paul Schrader's unforgettable dissection of the American Dream. One of the 70s most shamefully overlooked films! *Tuesday, August 31* *THIEF* (1981) Michael Mann's first feature as a director is also one of his best! James Caan, Tuesday Weld and Willie Nelson star in this rugged, visually exhilarating crime saga. Tangerine Dream does the music. *CUTTER'S WAY* (1982) John Heard, Jeff Bridges, and Lisa Eichhorn all take home the acting honors in Ivan Passer's heartbreakingly real drama of post-Vietnam War disillusionment. *Wednesday, September 1* *MICKEY ONE* (1965) A couple of years before they altered cinema history with "Bonnie & Clyde," Warren Beatty and director Arthur Penn teamed up for this one-of-a-kind existential crime drama. *THE WOMAN CHASER* (1999) Based on Charles Willeford's demented novel of the same name, this is one whacked-out, retro noir classic in the making. Patrick Walburton (Putty, on the "Seinfeld" show is the star). *Thursday, September 2* *HARDCORE* (1979) George C, Scott as the straighlaced Michigan businessman who comes to LA in order to rescue his teenage daughter from the evils of prostitution! "Oh my God, that's my daughter!" Peter Boyle plays a sleazy private eye. Paul Schrader wrote and directed. *ROLLING THUNDER* (1977) Brutally violent shocker finds William Devane in the unenviable position of seeking vengeance on those who murdered his family. Tommy Lee Jones plays his buddy. Schrade rwrote it; John Flynn directed.
  4. Dewey1960

    Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!

    Hi JF - Thanks for your very kind words about my noir show at the Roxie! I think it's going to be enormously exciting with a number of films that have been quite elusive. As for the films I'm personally most thrilled about presenting are: *JOHNNY O'CLOCK*, terrific debut feature from Robert Rossen, *THE WHISTLER*, totally eerie B noir directed by William Castle, *SOUL OF A MONSTER*, really interesting supernatural noir with the ominous George MacReady, both Joseph H. Lewis noirs, *MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS* and *SO DARK THE NIGHT*, Fritz Lang's evocative sizzler *HUMAN DESIRE*, the pair of noirs adapted from David Goodis' novels, *THE BURGLAR* and *NIGHTFALL*, Fuller's *CRIMSON KIMONO* and both the Irving Lerner / Vince Edwards films *MURDER BY CONTRACT* and *CITY OF FEAR*. Wow. Here's the schedule: http://www.roxie.com/events/details.cfm?eventid=80E856EB%2DACC8%2DFC5D%2DA2373DFE6FB28ADB
  5. Dewey1960

    Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!

    Hi finance! You might find it interesting to know that one of the films in the Roxie's upcoming film noir extravaganza, *THE BURGLAR*, was written by one of Philadelphia's most notable writers--David Goodis. Much of the picture was filmed right there in Philly!
  6. Dewey1960

    Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!

    Arkadin said: *Soul of a Monster hits the big screen! I can't wait to hear what everyone thinks about that one.* *SOUL OF A MONSTER* represents one of the more intriguing hybrids of the noir style---a blend of pulp mysticism and B noir mystery. I think that fans of the style will find this film to be a revelation and hopefully open the door for more widespread acceptance. It's quite remarkable on a variety of levels.
  7. Dewey1960

    Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!

    For those interested in more info regarding the Roxie noir program, including descriptions of films, etc...here's the link to the Roxie Theater's website: http://www.roxie.com/events/details.cfm?eventid=80E856EB%2DACC8%2DFC5D%2DA2373DFE6FB28ADB
  8. Dewey1960

    Best of Columbia Noir at SF's Roxie in September!

    I?m pleased and proud to announce that the *Roxie Theater in San Francisco* has invited me back to curate another program of great noir films, commencing on *Thursday, September 17 and running through Wednesday, September 30*. This time around we?ll be presenting a whopping twenty-two films from the fabled vaults of *Columbia Pictures*! Although it has been reported that Sony has plans for releasing a handful of these titles on DVD later in the year, none are currently available in that format. I sincerely hope that noir enthusiasts from all over, not just the Bay Area, will find their way to the Roxie next month for this incredibly exciting series! *THE BEST OF COLUMBIA NOIR :* *TWENTY-TWO GEMS FROM THE VAULTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES!* *ALL SHOWN IN BEAUTIFUL, NEWLY RESTORD 35MM STUDIO ARCHIVE PRINTS!* *Thursday, September 17 - Wednesday, September 30* *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17:* JOHNNY O?CLOCK (1947) BLIND SPOT (1947) *FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18:* THE WHISTLER (1944) THE SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944) *SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19:* KNOCK ON ANY DOOR (1949) CONVICTED (1950) *SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20:* PUSHOVER (1954) DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (1954) *MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21:* SO DARK THE NIGHT (1946) MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945) *TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22:* HUMAN DESIRE (1954) FRAMED (1947) *WED SEPT 23: NO SHOW TONIGHT!* *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24:* THE LINE UP (1958) THE SNIPER (1952) *FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25:* BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN (1950) THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK (1950) *SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26:* THE CRIMSON KIMONO (1959) SCREAMING MIMI (1958) *SUNDAY & MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 & 28:* THE BURGLAR (1957) NIGHTFALL (1957) *TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 & 30:* MURDER BY CONTRACT (1958) CITY OF FEAR (1959)
  9. I?m pleased and proud to announce that the *Roxie Theater in San Francisco* has invited me back to curate another program of great noir films, commencing on *Thursday, September 17 and running through Wednesday, September 30*. This time around we?ll be presenting a whopping twenty-two films from the fabled vaults of *Columbia Pictures*! Although it has been reported that Sony has plans for releasing a handful of these titles on DVD later in the year, none are currently available in that format. I sincerely hope that noir enthusiasts from all over, not just the Bay Area, will find their way to the Roxie next month for this incredibly exciting series! *THE BEST OF COLUMBIA NOIR :* *TWENTY-TWO GEMS FROM THE VAULTS OF COLUMBIA PICTURES!* *ALL SHOWN IN BEAUTIFUL, NEWLY RESTORD 35MM STUDIO ARCHIVE PRINTS!* *Thursday,?September 17?- Wednesday,?September 30* *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17:* JOHNNY O?CLOCK (1947) BLIND SPOT?(1947) *FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18:* THE WHISTLER (1944) THE SOUL OF A MONSTER (1944)? *SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19:* KNOCK ON ANY DOOR (1949) CONVICTED (1950) *SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20:* PUSHOVER (1954) DRIVE A CROOKED ROAD (1954) *MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21:* SO DARK THE NIGHT (1946) MY NAME IS JULIA ROSS (1945) *TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22:* HUMAN DESIRE?(1954) FRAMED (1947) *WED SEPT 23: NO SHOW TONIGHT!* *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24:* THE LINE UP (1958) THE SNIPER (1952) *FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25:* BETWEEN MIDNIGHT AND DAWN (1950) THE KILLER THAT STALKED NEW YORK (1950) *SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26:* THE CRIMSON KIMONO (1959) SCREAMING MIMI (1958) *SUNDAY & MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 & 28:* THE BURGLAR (1957) NIGHTFALL (1957) *TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 & 30:* MURDER BY CONTRACT?(1958) CITY OF FEAR (1959)
  10. Dewey1960

    The Haunted World of the B Film Noir this May in SF

    Our film noir series at the Roxie in San Francisco---I WAKE UP DREAMING---went out on a high note Thursday night with the massive pairing of *CITY OF FEAR* (1959) and *SHACK OUT ON 101* (1955), two cold war curios that had the packed house on their feet. This has been a great two weeks of dark fun, but it isn't quite over yet. The crowds have demanded more, so we've cobbled together another six nights of double-shots, a Best of the Fest that (finally!) comes to an end on Wednesday, June 3. Last night (Friday) we showed *THE DEVIL THUMBS A RIDE* and *FRAMED* Sat 5/30: *ALL NIGHT LONG* and *THE HOODLUM* Sun 5/31: *PRIVATE HELL 36* and *NEW YORK CONFIDENTIAL* Mon 6/1: *ALLOTMENT WIVES* and *PORT OF 40 THIEVES* Tues 6/2: *THE LAST CROOKED MILE* and *THE GUILTY* Wed 6/3: *THE SPECTER OF THE ROSE* and *THE MADONNA'S SECRET*
  11. Dewey1960

    The Haunted World of the B Film Noir this May in SF

    Another exceptional double feature *Tuesday night at the Roxie!!* First up was *THE PRETENDER*, a quite rare 1947 poverty row noir from Republic Pictures. Directed by W. Lee Wilder (Billy Wilder's older brother!) and starring the incredible Albert Dekker, it also has the distinction of being the first hard-core noir film shot by John Alton. His work here is deliriously bizarre, creating major mood shifts with sudden dramatic lighting changes and eye-popping shadow play. The story of a corrupt financial advisor who plunders a client's holdings is transformed into an exercise in mounting paranoia thanks largely to Alton's inventive camera work and Dekker's convincing performance. Also on tap was *SUSPENSE*, a 1946 Monogram production starring Barry Sullivan, Belita (the ice skating sensation!) and Albert Dekker. This film was, at the time, the highest budgeted Monogram film and it showed. Directed by Frank Tuttle, it has a fairly sumptuous look for a poverty row production (despite a somewhat muddled story line) and is absorbing from start to finish. *Wednesday night* featured a pair of Monogram noirs produced by and starring Kay Francis: *WIFE WANTED* (1946) and *ALLOTMENT WIVES* (1945). These would be Miss Francis' final Hollywood offerings and it's interesting that she chose to close her career on such a downbeat note--at a poverty row studio. Both deal with shady circumstances surrounding unwholesome enterprises: a lonely hearts club racket and a nefarious crime syndicate preying on the allotment checks of returning WWII vets. In *WIFE WANTED* Kay plays the one who is duped and in *ALLOTMENT WIVES* she?s the ring-leader of a pretty venal band of criminals. Well-paced ( Phil Karlson directed *WW* ) engrossing melodramas of the sort Kay appeared in periodically when she was one of the reigning divas on the (somewhat) tonier backlots at Warner Bros. Needless to say, the crowd ate it up! *Tonight (Thurs)* is our final regularly scheduled night before swinging into *SIX MORE NIGHTS* of ?by popular demand? bring backs! The unsuspecting Roxie crowd will be bludgeoned tonight by a duet of cold war noir curios. Edward Dein's minimalist nightmare *SHACK OUT ON 101* from 1955 is up first and nothing new can be added to what?s already been said about this ultra-bizarre film?alright, how about this: *LEE MARVIN and TERRY MOORE!!* Co-feature is Irving Lerner?s 1959 noir thriller *CITY OF FEAR*. Once again Vince Edwards proves his niche as one of the 1950s nastiest noir anti-heroes. In Kubrick?s *THE KILLING* (56) he sizzles off the screen as Marie Windsor's violent lover, looming large like a black storm cloud of masculine sexual energy in every scene he's in and in Lerner?s *MURDER BY CONTRACT* (58) he goes deep inside as a pragmatic hit man. In this film he plays a desperate escaped con who mistakes a container of *RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL* for heroin! Will the cops be able to bring him down before an entire city becomes infected with radioactive poisoning!?! Only those at the Roxie tonight are likely to ever know the answer to that.
  12. Dewey1960

    The Haunted World of the B Film Noir this May in SF

    CM asked: *with the audiences at your show, do they watch the film respectfully, knowing the film was from another time...or do they laugh at it. Are they getting it or making fun of it?* I can honestly say that the Roxie noir crowd is perhaps the most respectful and reverential audience there is. They laugh when something is legitimately funny and cheer wildly when that particular emotional response is called for. I've sat through many so-called classic noir films at other theaters and the audience reaction can be maddening at best; condescending and smug. The Castro Theater, not far from the Roxie, holds its own Noir festival each year, and I really can't attend for that very reason. It seems to attract the tourists and the squares (along with a great many honest-to-goodness fans in all fairness) but the cumulative experience is, well, distracting at the very least. My hat really goes off to the Roxie audience; they are the best!!
  13. Dewey1960

    The Haunted World of the B Film Noir this May in SF

    Last night we presented a pair of insanely rare and obscure noirs with the underlying theme of prostitution running wildly through them. And while the theme manifested in this sensationalized nature, these two films were really much more about the abusive treatment of women at the hands of evil, sadistic men. *UNDER AGE* (1941) is a seldom seen Columbia B oddity directed by Edward Dmytryk near the beginning of his illustrious yet controversial career. Two young sisters are released from the Girl's Reformatory and are immediately preyed upon by a lascivious group of men (pimps) who offer them employment at "The House By The Side of the Road," a thinly veiled prostitution racket run by Miss Burke, a hardened dame who puts the girls to work dragging suckers in off the road where they are bilked by this treacherous gang (as well as the girls) in one way or another. Things rapidly go from bad to worse for the girls with death and tragedy looming prominently. An absolutely thrilling and fantastic climax had the capacity crowd at the Roxie in a fever pitch!! Outstanding!! The co-feature was *WOMEN IN THE NIGHT*, a 1948 film about American women held prisoner by Nazi and Japanese soldiers and forced to work as "hostesses" at the Shanghai Officer's Club. Very little is left to the imagination here and the result is a high impact tale of sex and slavery, photographed with maximum noir integrity by the legendary Eugene Shufftan! All in all, a remarkable night of lurid noir entertainment at the Roxie and needless to say the packed house was delirious with delight. Our cavalcade of B noir nightmares continues tonight with rare screenings of the poverty row gems *SUSPENSE* (1946) and *THE PRETENDER* (1947).
  14. Dewey1960

    anyone have a list of "B" noirs?

    CM, you said: *I have "Blonde Ice." I'd better pull that out of my pile soon and check it out.* You've got a handful of great reasons to check out *BLONDE ICE*, like pronto: 1) Leslie Brooks, a fairly obscure thesp, turns in one incredible femme fatale performance, very much in the Janis Carter / Jean Gillie school of casual cruelty. 2) It was directed by Jack Bernhard, he of *DECOY* fame. 3) It was rumored (as yet unsubstantiated) to have originated from a story written by Edgar G. Ulmer. It was produced by Martin Mooney, who produced Ulmer's classic *DETOUR*. 4) It's only 73 minutes. 5) It's great. ps: No trenchcoat, no fedora.
  15. Dewey1960

    anyone have a list of "B" noirs?

    Here?s a random list of 1940s B noirs that just happened to fly out of my head; there are literally hundreds more where these came from, so you might see it as something of a ?starter kit.? I intentionally left off many of the higher profile titles form the major studios---many of those (like *JOHNNY O'CLOCK, PHANTOM LADY, BLACK ANGEL*, etc) tend to blur the line betwixt A & B. The films listed here are bona fide B delights, not to be missed by hard-core fanatics! *STRANGER ON THE 3rd FLOOR* (1940; RKO) *STREET OF CHANCE* (1942; PARAMOUNT) *THE LEOPARD MAN* (1943; RKO) *WHEN STRANGERS MARRY* (1944; MONOGRAM) *THE WHISTLER* (1944; COLUMBIA) *MARK OF THE WHISTLER* (1944; COLUMBIA) *PORT OF 40 THIEVES* (1944; REPUBLIC) *ALLOTMENT WIVES* (1945; MONOGRAM) *THE STRANGE MR. GREGORY* (1945; MONOGRAM) *POWER OF THE WHISTLER* (1945; COLUMBIA) *BEWITCHED* (1945; MGM) *STRANGE ILLUSION* (1945; PRC) *DETOUR* (1945; PRC) *DECOY* (1946; MONOGRAM) *NIGHT EDITOR* (1946; COLUMBIA) *THE LAST CROOKED MILE* (1946; REPUBLIC) *THE MYSTERIOUS INTRUDER* (1946; COLUMBIA) *THE PRETENDER* (1947; REPUBLIC) *RAILROADED!* (1947; PRC) *THE DEVIL THUMBS A RIDE* (1947; RKO) *THE GUILTY* (1947; MONOGRAM) *HIGH TIDE* (1947; MONOGRAM) *FEAR IN THE NIGHT* (1947; PINE-THOMAS / PARAMOUNT) *VIOLENCE* (1947; MONOGRAM) *FRAMED* (1947; COLUMBIA) *BLONDE ICE* (1948; FILM CLASSICS) *OPEN SECRET* (1948; MARATHON) *THE THREAT* (1949; RKO) *DOA* (1949; UA)

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