cigarjoe

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Everything posted by cigarjoe

  1. WORST "Fashion" Trends

    magnetic lashes. looks like one goes on top of the eyelid one goes under and the magnetically stick together.
  2. I think he's using a phone.....
  3. I Just Watched...

    The Killer That Stalked New York (1950) Public Service Noir The title sequence with a giant silhouette of a woman looming over NYC gives a preview of the gravity of the unfolding story. Director: Earl McEvoy. Writers: Milton Lehman (a Colliers Magazine article), Harry Essex (adaptation). Cinematography was by Joseph F. Biroc, and music was by Hans J. Salter. Starring Evelyn Keyes, Charles Korvin, Jim Backus, Whit Bissell, Dorothy Malone, Lola Albright, and William Bishop. This is sort of a companion piece to Panic In The Streets (1950). It's part film noir and part public service education. The film almost flawlessly transitions between New York location footage, Los Angeles location footage, and studio sets. The only giveaways are the street lamps, New York has the old Bishop's Crook lamps, the L.A. Columbia Studio studio sets use the single globe on a concrete post Hollywood type lamps, and they are also invariably illuminated by bright California sunshine, in contrast to the drabber real Manhattan cityscapes. This is an OK thriller, though it does beg the question about what happened to all the other contacts Sheila made before she hit NYC, the people on the boat or plane she took from Cuba, she most assuredly came in contact with before she took the train. Unless she was somehow not contagious during some type of incubation period, but what do I know. This film has great location shots of old Penn Station, various Manhattan locals and a great 3rd Avenue el sequence at the old Chatham Square Station that I've captured and uploaded on Youtube below: Keyes is great in this and her makeup gets increasingly effective conveying her sickness, its part of the Bad Girls of Film Noir set 7/10. Full review with more screencaps here: Noirsville
  4. Recently watched Noir

    The Killer That Stalked New York (1950) Public Service Noir (parts of this from original SLWB review - April 07, 2012) The title sequence with a giant silhouette of a woman looming over NYC gives a preview of the gravity of the unfolding story. Director: Earl McEvoy. Writers: Milton Lehman (a Colliers Magazine article), Harry Essex (adaptation). Cinematography was by Joseph F. Biroc, and music was by Hans J. Salter. Starring Evelyn Keyes, Charles Korvin, Jim Backus, Whit Bissell, Dorothy Malone, Lola Albright, and William Bishop. This is sort of a companion piece to Panic In The Streets (1950). It's part film noir and part public service education. The film almost flawlessly transitions between New York location footage, Los Angeles location footage, and studio sets. The only giveaways are the street lamps, New York has the old Bishop's Crook lamps, the L.A. Columbia Studio studio sets use the single globe on a concrete post Hollywood type lamps, and they are also invariably illuminated by bright California sunshine, in contrast to the drabber real Manhattan cityscapes. Torch singer Sheila Bennett (Keyes) is returning to New York from Cuba. Sheila is the mule in a husband-wife jewel smuggling racket, carrying $50,000 worth of smuggled diamonds, but she is also carrying unbeknownst to her, Smallpox. She was smart enough to see that she was being tailed once she was in the U.S. on the rail trip from Florida, by a customs agent (Barry Kelley). Shelia had the smarts to mail the ice from some R.P.O. along her route, to her ivory tickling "husband" Matt Krane (Korvin), living in New York City. She arrives at Pennsylvania Station not realizing that she's now carrying the contagious Smallpox virus that spreads on contact which could start a devastating and quickly spreading epidemic in the unprotected city of eight million. Sheila (Keyes) in a phone booth at Penn Station. Once off the train, she immediately calls Matt. She tells him about the customs agent and her precaution to mail the smuggled diamonds to their apartment in Brooklyn. Hubby tells her to check into a Times Square dive hotel The America (BTW, this hotel was a dive hangout for showbiz lowlifes, prostitutes, pimps, and a favorite flop where Comedian Lenny Bruce would get geezed). Matt tells her to make sure the agent doesn't follow her to Brooklyn, but in actuality he is playing house while she's been away with her own very eager kid sister, and doesn't want her showing up at their apartment. Nice family. Sheila is not feeling well, she is now showing the symptoms of Smallpox, she has headaches and back pains and re-occurring fevers. She finds a clinic off Times Square on the way to Brooklyn and there meets nurse (Malone) and Doctor Wood (Bishop). They misdiagnose her with the flu and Dr. Wood gives her some medicine to take. Before Sheila leaves the clinic she gives a small girl a decorative pin, contact with the pin infects the child, Sheila is a walking death spreader. The child soon comes down with the symptoms and other victims begin to show up sick. Smallpox is diagnosed and now Sheila is hunted by Custom agent Johnson while Public Health doctor Wood searches in vain for the unknown person spreading the deadly disease far and wide. Arriving at her apartment in Brooklyn Sheila finds her baby sister (Albright) there with her Husband. Albright is doing the tube steak boogie with Matt but the increasingly ill Sheila is at first too sick to notice. Meanwhile, Custom agent Johnson loses her when she leaves the hotel through a barbershop, with the help of a bribed bellboy. But het keeps doggedly on the trail, searching theatrical agencies for some leads; while Doctor Wood and an increasingly concerned New York City Public Health Service searches the areas where new victims are turning up from their contacts with Shelia. Sheila eventually finds out from Belle the nosy landlady (Connie Gilchrist), that her husband is double crossing her concerning the diamonds, and is screwing her sister. From that point on she becomes obsessed with finding her faithless shitheel husband Matt. Matt plans to abscond with the loot from the diamonds. Sheila finds out, from the crooked jeweler (Art Smith) they are in cahoots with, that Matt will be back in ten days after the heat dies down, with the diamonds. The medicine from the doctor and her determination to get Matt is keeping her alive. Sheila flees to her brother's (Whit Bissell) Bowery flop house "the Moon" and hides out there. The film is chuck full of great NYC footage circa 1949-50. Shots that haunt the memories of New Yorkers old enough to remember the city as it used to be before the need of historic preservation, when urban renewal, and gentrification changed things forever. Watch for Pennsylvania Station, Times Square, Battery Park and the Third Avenue el. Noirsville This is an OK thriller, though it does beg the question about what happened to all the other contacts Sheila made before she hit NYC, the people on the boat or plane she took from Cuba, she most assuredly came in contact with before she took the train. Unless she was somehow not contagious during some type of incubation period, but what do I know. This film has great location shots of old Penn Station, various Manhattan locals and a great 3rd Avenue el sequence at the old Chatham Square Station that I've captured and uploaded on Youtube below: Keyes is great in this and her makeup gets increasingly effective conveying her sickness, its part of the Bad Girls of Film Noir set 7/10. Full review with more screencaps here: Noirsville
  5. Recently watched Noir

    Appointment with Danger (1951) Director, Lewis Allen with Alan Ladd, Phyllis Calvert, Paul Steward, Jan Sterling, Jack Webb, Stacy Harris, Harry Morgan, David Wolfe, Dan Riss, Geraldine Wall, and George J. Lewis. Great opening sequence of a body disposal in the pouring rain I was hooked from the get go. Also some nice railroad/railyard footage and industrial landscapes of Gary Indiana steel mills. Alan Ladd is Al Goddard, a USPS special investigator sent to Gary, Ind., to solve a postal detective's murder. A young nun Sister Augustine (Phyllis Calvert) is the sole witness. With her aid Ladd learns the identity of the men and uncovers the gang's plot to pull off a million-dollar mail heist. Jan Sterling plays gang leaders floozy jazz loving girlfriend Dodie La Verne. Jack Webb plays a loose cannon creep and Harry Morgan a slow witted goon. Very enjoyable 8/10. Down Three Dark Streets (1954) directed by Arnold Laven with Broderick Crawford, Ruth Roman, Martha Hyer, Marisa Pavan, Max Showalter (Niagara), Kenneth Tobey, Gene Reynolds, and William Johnstone. Sort of a police procedural, quasi-documentary, stars Broderick Crawford as FBI Agent John Ripley.When fellow G-man Zack Stewart is murdered, Ripley takes over the trio of cases Stewart had been working on assuming one of them will reveal his killer. This one is also entertaining but its a bit fuzzy in logic with the motives of the actual murderer the connection of why he killed the FBI man and his girlfriend? or whatever she was is never connected. Martha Hyer is a cute mobsters girlfriend. It does have some great location shots of LA and the streetcar system and ends up with a great set piece at the base of the iconic HOLLYWOOD sign. Entertaining, but the lack of plot connection explained above drops this to a 7/10
  6. Not enough Noir?

    But if you think about it Naked City, In A Lonely Place and The Third Man,won Oscars and Mistery Street was nominated, there may be others, so they could have worked Oscars into the program
  7. Future of Democratic Party?

    Gonna take a dog to eat a dog, I see Hardball's Chris Matthews is troting out Joe Kennedy III, a big F-That, we don't need more of the same ol' same ol' crap.
  8. I Just Watched...

    Go Tell the Spartans (1978) A Vietnam War film I never heard of. 8/10
  9. I Just Watched...

    Tess - pretty depressing tale beautifully shot.
  10. Presidential Material for sure with our new low bar standards.
  11. The Triumph of Donald Trump

    More republicat poop
  12. Music of Film Noir

    Mark Isham's haunting Romeo Is Bleeding soundtrack, Empty Chambers followed by the beautiful Romeo Is Dreaming.
  13. I'd vote for him against Trump hands down, it's gonna take a dog to eat a dog.
  14. I Just Watched...

    The Silent Partner (1978) A bank teller Eliot Gould is held up at gun point by a Santa Claus (Christopher Plummer), during the holidays in Toronto. The robbery takes place after a large deposit is made. But he's anticipating the heist because of two things, a discarded withdrawal slip he found earlier with identical capitol "G's" that match a hand drawn sign he spots held by the same Santa Claus, and the fact that the Santa was going to rob the bank right after a large deposit was made by a local business man, but he was foiled in the earlier attempt by a small boy who attracted a lot of attention because wanted to tell Santa his Christmas list. Because the observant teller knows whats coming he devises a way to steal most of the money for himself while letting Santa get away with a portion. Its a nice little cat and mouse game once the real thief figures out what happened and wants a cut of the loot. Susannah York, Céline Lomez and John Candy round out the rest of the cast . 8/10
  15. What you need after all this rep con bushwah! Wipe!
  16. Noir Alley

    I agree with you there, I just watched The St. Valentine's Day Massacre about a week ago. But another crime drama that was on recently also Murder, Inc. (1960), starring Stuart Whitman, May Britt, Henry Morgan, Peter Falk, Simon Oakland, and Vincent Gardenia was close to a Noir, it had the Dutch angles and some stylistics in enough shots to get that noir tuning fork vibrating. I've now seen enough Classic Noir and Neo Noir, to actually say that between the two there is a third, what I'm now calling Transitional Noir that bridges the gap. Noir was transitioning/morphing into Neo Noir. With the end of studio "B" film production and the weakening of the Motion Picture Production Code, Classic Noir unraveled. Crime stories were syphoning off to TV. Poverty Row, Independent, and other low budget film creators were taking more artistic liberties, and making films targeting certain demographics. So those Film Noir that went too far over the line depicting violence started getting classified as Horror, Thriller (even though they were just say, showing the effects of a gunshot wound, or dealing with weird or kinky serial killers, maniacs, and psychotics, etc.). Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) opened that tangent. Those that went too far depicting sexual, drug, torture, juvenile delinquency, etc., storylines and situations were now being lumped into, or classed as various Exploitation flicks, (even though they are relatively tame comparably to today's films). The noir-ish films that dealt with everything else, except Crime, concerning the human condition were labeled Dramas and Suspense. Those that tried new techniques, lenses, etc., were labeled Experimental films.
  17. I Just Watched...

    The Big Combo (1955) Noir Masterpiece Directed by Joseph (H) Lewis (My Name Is Julia Ross(1945), So Dark the Night (1946), The Undercover Man(1949), Gun Crazy (1950). This was Lewis' last Classic Film Noir. The film stars the usual noir suspects, Cornell Wilde, Brian Donlevy, Richard Conte, Lee Van Cleef, Robert Middleton, Earl Holliman, Ted de Corsia, Jay Adler, John Hoyt, along with Jean Wallace, Helene Stanton, and Helen Walker. Director of photography was the great John Alton (Bury Me Dead (1947), T-Men (1947), Raw Deal (1948), Canon City (1948), The Amazing Mr. X (1948), Hollow Triumph(1948), He Walked by Night (1948), one of Noirsville's favorites The Crooked Way (1949), Border Incident(1949), Mystery Street (1950), The People Against O'Hara (1951), I, the Jury (1953), and another fave color Classic Noir Slightly Scarlet (1956). The film, consequently, is very dark and quite stylistically lighted as you would expect. The screenplay was by Philip Yordan, who gave us Dillinger (1945), Whistle Stop (1946), The Chase(1946), House of Strangers (1949), Panic in the Streets (1950), Edge of Doom (1950), No Way Out (1950), Detective Story (1951), Joe MacBeth (1955), and The Harder They Fall (1956). The story has a sort "Dirty Harry-esque," rouge cop M.O. The tale supposedly takes place in the 93rd Precinct, however there was no 93rd Precinct in 1955. The closest in numbers the 90th and the 94th are located in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Obsessed NYPD Police Detective Lt. Leonard Diamond (Wilde) is on the hunt for sharp dressed, rapidly staccato talking, sadistic, and carnal Brooklyn based mobster Brown (Conte) whose real Italian name is probably Marrone, Marrono or Maronna. Almost all the other goombah's in the Combo have Italian names. Marrone is Italian for Brown. Its a gritty, violent film noir that shows some surprising sparks of style. Watch for McClure's silent rub out. A very kinky film indeed, stylishly lit and directed. The whole film has a consistent dark halo around it as if you are peeping on the characters from out of a sewer, we can call it "Sewerscope". The Big Combo has it all, not one but two obsessed characters, a Femme Fatale, sexual innuendos, stylistic lighting and again McClure's (Donlevy) demise is just icing on this cake. There are one or two far-fetched plot points but the film is so overwhelmingly compellingly sleazy that you just go with the (sewage) flow. One of my favorites, 9/10. Full review with some screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster.
  18. Recently watched Noir

    The Big Combo (1955) Noir Masterpiece Directed by Joseph (H) Lewis (My Name Is Julia Ross(1945), So Dark the Night (1946), The Undercover Man(1949), Gun Crazy (1950). This was Lewis' last Classic Film Noir. The film stars the usual noir suspects, Cornell Wilde, Brian Donlevy, Richard Conte, Lee Van Cleef, Robert Middleton, Earl Holliman, Ted de Corsia, Jay Adler, John Hoyt, along with Jean Wallace, Helene Stanton, and Helen Walker. Director of photography was the great John Alton (Bury Me Dead (1947), T-Men (1947), Raw Deal (1948), Canon City (1948), The Amazing Mr. X (1948), Hollow Triumph(1948), He Walked by Night (1948), one of Noirsville's favorites The Crooked Way (1949), Border Incident(1949), Mystery Street (1950), The People Against O'Hara (1951), I, the Jury (1953), and another fave color Classic Noir Slightly Scarlet (1956). The film, consequently, is very dark and quite stylistically lighted as you would expect. The screenplay was by Philip Yordan, who gave us Dillinger (1945), Whistle Stop (1946), The Chase(1946), House of Strangers (1949), Panic in the Streets (1950), Edge of Doom (1950), No Way Out (1950), Detective Story (1951), Joe MacBeth (1955), and The Harder They Fall (1956). The has appropriately a both equally sleazy and jarring "Jazz Noir" score, with what sounds like an alto sax dominating the piece, was by David Raksin. There is also a film credit listing for Jacob Gimple as a piano soloist. The film opens the piece with a fly-by of grimy, gritty, grid street lay out of 1950s Manhattan, New York City. All this was replaced just like Los Angeles' Bunker Hill whose soaring skyscrapers are it's modern tombstones. The "Big Apple" is less gritty now in the old Times Square, but apparently just as wormy as in the old days only it's spread out and hidden better. Once the credit sequence of second unit or stock footage ends the rest of the film is shot with L.A. and studio sets filling in for NYC. Diamond (Wilde) The story has a sort "Dirty Harry-esque," rouge cop M.O. The tale supposedly takes place in the 93rd Precinct, however there was no 93rd Precinct in 1955. The closest in numbers the 90th and the 94th are located in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Obsessed NYPD Police Detective Lt. Leonard Diamond (Wilde) is on the hunt for sharp dressed, rapidly staccato talking, sadistic, and carnal Brooklyn based mobster Brown (Conte) whose real Italian name is probably Marrone, Marrono or Maronna. Almost all the other goombah's in the Combo have Italian names. Marrone is Italian for Brown. Brown (Conte) His oft repeated philosophy is "First is first and second is nobody!" Brown got strong enough to be capo by having Hate in his heart. His favorite form of persuading is using a hearing aid as a torture devise, using, what else, loud degenerate jazz music that features a "real crazy" drum solo. This is followed by a 40% alcohol hair tonic chaser. Diamond has already spent $18,600 of taxpayer money surveilling one man Brown. He gets berated from Peterson his commanding officer. Diamond's defense is that it's not just one man but a "Combination", the Mob, basically. He get's told that he's fighting the swamp with a teaspoon. Diamond rambles convoluted-ly on telling us he's worried about "the High School kids who come into the city and get loaded and irresponsible, they lose their shirts, and they get a gun, and they're worried and wanna make up their losses, and a filling station attendant is dead with a bullet in his liver.... and I have to see four kids on trial for first degree murder...." Yea, OBSESSED. He's also got a six month hard on for Brown's (Conte's) cute, cultured, blonde, chapping at the bit, bombshell, girlfriend Susan (Wallace). Jay Adler is Detective Sam Hill, Wilde's partner who shadows both Susan, and the two slightly "light in the loafer" escorts Mingo (Earl Holliman) and Fante (Lee Van Cleef). Brown employs these two skells to escort Susan about town. He must figure they are more interested in screwing each other than Susan or women in general. Forgedaboudit, these crooks are all made out in best 50s fashion, to be the lowest of the low degenerates. Fante (Van Cleef), Susan, Mingo (Holliman) Police Capt. Peterson (Robert Middleton) tells him in the best Noir subtext to forget basically "the ****" Susan, pointing out to Diamond she spent a lot of time "days....and nights" going around the block and around the world with Brown. Unsubtly later, Susan enforces this when in a night club she tells a former friend of the family that, she no longer plays the piano, now a days all she plays is "stud poke-her". Later on she tells Brown she's wearing what she's wearing instead of white because "white" doesn't suit her anymore. Helene Stanton plays a statuesque, voluptuous, brunette burlesque dancer Rita (a sort of a Marie Windsor look-a-like) who is stuck on Diamond. Diamond seems to be just using her for sex. Diamond (Wide) and statuesque Rita (can't fix stupid, no?) Wilde really needs to see a shrink, he doesn't know a good thing when he sees it, but he also becomes overly obsessed with saving "soiled" dove Susan. McClure (Donlevy) is Brown's second banana who he inherited when he took over the racket from Grassi who left suddenly for Sicily. Jay Adler plays Diamond's partner Detective Sam Hill. Helen Walker appears rather late in the film as Brown's ex-wife Alicia Brown. When Diamond first hears about Alicia after Susan takes an overdose of sleeping pills, he rounds up all of Browns known associates and again gets called to the carpet for making 67 false arrests. Ted de Corsia is almost unrecognizable in a nice cameo as the broken English speaking Combo man on the lamb, Ralph Bettini. The quest to find Alicia eventually sends Brown off to Noirsville. Noirsville Diamond (Wilde) on way to Burlesque House to blow off some steam or whatever. Its a gritty, violent film noir that shows some surprising sparks of style. Watch for McClure's silent rub out. Wilde is such an overly obsessive self-righteous prick, you catch yourself rooting for Conte to dump him in the East River with a set of cement overshoes. And speaking of shoes, Wilde has something of a shoe fetish so keep an ear out for Wilde's classic Noir line about Rita, "Saks Fifth Avenue. . . She came to see me in her best shoes." Conte is just as obsessed with both power and with Susan, at one point we see them, after a confrontation putting the "kink" on. Conte kisses her hard, one of his hands drop out of sight we see her eyes practically roll up into her head before the cut Conte starts heading "south", and you don't need a paint by the numbers picture with circles and arrows to figure out where "things" are going.... and according to the story they have been going on for about four years. Conte's Brown, is arguably, one of his most memorable characters. A very kinky film indeed, stylishly lit and directed. The whole film has a consistent dark halo around it as if you are peeping on the characters from out of a sewer, we can call it "Sewerscope". The Big Combo has it all, not one but two obsessed characters, a Femme Fatale, sexual innuendos, stylistic lighting and again McClure's (Donlevy) demise is just icing on this cake. There are one or two far-fetched plot points but the film is so overwhelmingly compellingly sleazy that you just go with the (sewage) flow. One of my favorites, 9/10. Full review with more screencaps here: Noirsville
  19. I Just Watched...

    He's pretty good in the Noirs Quicksand, Drive a Crooked Road and the Transitional Noir Requiem For A Heavyweight.
  20. Getting back to wine, the most appropriate wine for film noirs is probably a muscatel short dog nicely packaged in a dirty twisted paper bag
  21. Hopefully good enough to be charged with accessory to obstruction of justice along with the **** In Chief.
  22. Maybe they should make a love bot based on Sanders for ya.

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