cigarjoe

Members
  • Content Count

    4,632
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by cigarjoe

  1. I enjoy hearing archaic expressions in films of the past, some are decipherable some to me at least are not. If you are old enough you'll know the origins of these two: "I kick started the jalopy", or "I stepped on the starter." I heard one character telling another that "I'll do him like Dempsey." If you didn't know who Dempsey was you may not get the reference. "Jack" Dempsey, nicknamed "Kid ****" and "The Manassa Mauler", was an American professional boxer who competed from 1914 to 1927, and reigned as the world heavyweight champion from 1919 to 1926. here are a few more: double clutch smoke wrench ice box now you're cooking with gas dressed to the nines no-talent hack slaphappy do a Brodie I'll think of others and post them here. Now how about the rest of you out there, got any?
  2. cigarjoe

    How To Get My Age Bracket (20-30) Into Cinema

    Agree, the new adaptation was truer/closer to what the landscape in the book looked like. The Colorado Rockies used in the original doesn't fit at all. What the original had was the ability to use stock company of seasoned Western actors that made the good Western films feel as comfortable as an old pair of slippers.
  3. cigarjoe

    Drafting a Movie Concept Script

    He brought that bit of misery on himself by rubbing people the wrong way from the get go.
  4. cigarjoe

    THE GET SMART THREAD

    Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, I've read his Attack and Defense of Fortified Places, he could tell you exactly how long a defence would last. There are some nice examples of his fortification designs here in the Eastern part of North America. Ft. Carillon (Ticonderoga) Louisbourg Ft. Duquesne
  5. cigarjoe

    Archaic Expressions in Films

    What are you, banned from starting new threads yourself?
  6. cigarjoe

    Kid Sisters

    The Prescott girls Eve (Carroll Baker) and Lilith (Debbie Reynolds) (don't remember which one was the "kid.")
  7. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    Fredric Brown novel of the same name.
  8. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    The book it's based on is way better than the film, and the strip show music was kind head scratching and of off the wall, I believe that it was Gypsy Rose Lee as the strip club owner. P.S. In the book her striptease act was accompanied by her dog who removed the various articles of her clothing.
  9. cigarjoe

    MUSIC THAT INFLUENCED "ME" GROWING-UP

    These also on my GE transistor radio:
  10. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    The Steampunk-ers would love it.
  11. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    That's sort of up to you, it sort of presages our current state of affairs, and that makes it interesting.
  12. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    Death Wish (1974) The Original Vigilante Noir Shootout on the Broadway-Seventh Avenue Express I had left New York City and was living for two years in Montana when Death Wish came out. Ten years later in a life imitates art incident on December 22, 1984, three days before Christmas, Bernhard Goetz gave four teenagers, Barry Allen, Troy Canty, Darrell Cabey and James Ramseur lead Christmas presents on a NYC Broadway–Seventh Avenue Downtown No. 2 Train Express. These four punks each with previous arrest records were on their way to rob a Playland or Fascination Video Arcade in downtown Manhattan. The train of R22 subway cars pulls into 14th Street Station and squeals to a stop. People get off. About fifteen or twenty stay on board car number 7657, it was the seventh car of a ten car train. At 14th Street Bernie Goetz gets on through the rearmost sliding door. He crosses the aisle and takes a seat on the long bench facing the same door. Canty was laying down on the bench alongside the right side of the same door. Allen was seated on the short bench on the other side of the same door. Ramseur and Cabey were on the same side of the train as Bernie right of the door next to the conductors cab. As the the doors whooshed shut, the train pulls out increasing its speed on the express track heading towards the next stop at Chambers Street. The train passes local stations Christopher and Houston. Somewhere near Canal Street, Canty asks Bernie 'How you doing?" Bernie responds "Fine." Then the four men give signals to each other and Canty and Allen get up and go to the left of Bernie blocking him off from the other passengers on the train. Canty then demanded "Give me five dollars!" "I'll give ya five!" Gotez stands up pulls a Smith & Wesson Model 38. An aluminum-framed, carbon steel cylinder and barreled, 5-shot revolver loaded with 38 Specials. He fires four quick shots. The first shot hits Canty in the chest, shot two gets Allen in the back as he's trying to get away from that crazy mother ****. Shot three goes through Ramseur's arm and into his side. The fourth shot missed Cabey standing in the corner by the conductors cab. It deflects off the wall. Cabey sits down. Gotez pauses, looks over the carnage sees that Cabey was still functioning either tells him tells him or thinks to himself, "You seem to be all right, here's another," and shoots him with his last shot. The rest of the passengers, terrified, knock over two women and run to the end of the car and through the connecting doors between. Train stops in the tunnel. The two women on the floor of the car were immobilized by fear. Goetz walks over to them to see if they were OK. The conductor arrives and Goetz tells him that "They tried to rob me." The conductor asks Goetz if he is a police officer. Goetz tells him no. Gotez then jumps to the tracks and runs South along the tunnel to Chambers Street. He heads up to the sidewalk and hurries for home. There, he packs a bag rents a car and splits for Bennington. Vermont. He gets rid of the gun, burns his blue jacket, he drives around New England hiding out in dive motels and paying cash. On December 29, Goetz calls his neighbor, Myra Friedman. She tells him the police are looking for him. He tells Myra his side of the story. "Myra, in a situation like this, your mind, you're in a combat situation. Your mind is functioning. You're not thinking in a normal way. Your memory isn't even working normally. You are so hyped up. Your vision actually changes. Your field of view changes. Your capabilities change. What you are capable of changes. You are under adrenaline, a drug called adrenaline. And you respond very quickly, and you think very quickly. That's all. ... You think! You think, you analyze, and you act. And in any situation, you just have to think more quickly than your opposition. That's all. You know. Speed is very important." Goetz hits the city on December 30th. He returns the rental, picks up some clothes, rents another car and heads appropriately to Concord, New "Live Free or Die" Hampshire to give himself up. Goetz was charged with attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment, and several firearms offenses. A jury found him not guilty of all charges except for one count of carrying an unlicensed firearm. Goetz served eight months of a one-year sentence. "Bernhard Goetz said that three years earlier in 1981, while transporting electronic equipment, he was attacked in the Canal Street subway station by three youths in an attempted robbery.The attackers smashed Goetz into a plate-glass door and threw him to the ground, permanently injuring his chest and knee. Goetz assisted an off-duty officer in arresting one of them; the other two attackers escaped. Goetz was angered when the arrested attacker spent less than half the time in the police station spent by Goetz himself, and he was angered further when this attacker was charged only with criminal mischief for ripping Goetz's jacket. Goetz subsequently applied for a permit to carry a concealed handgun, on the basis of routinely carrying valuable equipment and large sums of cash, but his application was denied for insufficient need. He bought a 5-shot .38-caliber revolver during a trip to Florida. The incident sparked a nationwide debate on race and crime in major cities, the legal limits of self-defense, and the extent to which the citizenry could rely on the police to secure their safety. Goetz, dubbed the "Subway Vigilante" by the New York press, came to symbolize New Yorkers' frustrations with the high crime rates of the 1980s. He was both praised and vilified in the media and public opinion. The incident has also been cited as a contributing factor to the groundswell movement against urban crime and disorder, and the successful National Rifle Association campaigns to loosen restrictions on the concealed carrying of firearms. (1984 New York City Subway shooting - Wikipedia) So obviously you got to ask was Bernie Goetz influenced by Death Wish? Directed by Michael Winner who directed two of the great Charles Bronson post Once Upon A Time In The West Westerns,/ Lawman (1971), and Chato's Land (1972). Death Wish was based on the novel Death Sentence by Brian Garfield, the screenplay was written by Wendell Mayes, Gerald Wilson (uncredited) , and Michael Winner (uncredited). Cinematography was by Arthur J. Ornitz known for The Pusher (1960), Rod Serling's Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), and Serpico (1973). The Music was by Herbie Hancock best known as a piano player, jazz star, and a composer, Round Midnight (1986). The film stars 1950's noir vet Charles Bronson (The People Against O'Hara (1951), The Mob(1951), Crime Wave (1953), Big House, U.S.A. (1955) and Man with a Camera TV Series (1958–1960)) as Paul Kersey, Hope Lange (Bus Stop (1956)) as Joanna Kersey, Kathleen Tolan as Carol Toby, Vincent Gardenia (Cop Hater (1958), Murder, Inc. (1960), Mad Dog Coll (1961), Moonstruck (1987)) as NYPD Lt. Frank Ochoa, William Redfield as Samuel "Sam" Kreutzer, Steven Keats as Jack Toby, Stuart Margolin (Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Rockford Files TV Series (1974–1980)) as Ames Jainchill, Jeff Goldblum as "Jughead" Freak #1, Olympia Dukakis (Moonstruck (1987)) as Cop at the precinct, and 1974 Manhattan. Of course the film was panned by many critics because of it showing vigilantism in a good light. Author Garfield was so disappointed in the 1974 film adaption that he wrote the sequel Death Sentence the following year. Nice New York City locations, with a controversial and interesting story 7/10 Screenshots and full review in Film Noir/Gangster pages
  13. cigarjoe

    Recently watched Noir

    Death Wish (1974) The Original Vigilante Noir Shootout on the Broadway-Seventh Avenue Express I had left New York City and was living for two years in Montana when Death Wish came out. Ten years later in a life imitates art incident on December 22, 1984, three days before Christmas, Bernhard Goetz gave four teenagers, Barry Allen, Troy Canty, Darrell Cabey and James Ramseur lead Christmas presents on a NYC Broadway–Seventh Avenue Downtown No. 2 Train Express. These four punks each with previous arrest records were on their way to rob a Playland or Fascination Video Arcade in downtown Manhattan. The train of R22 subway cars pulls into 14th Street Station and squeals to a stop. People get off. About fifteen or twenty stay on board car number 7657, it was the seventh car of a ten car train. At 14th Street Bernie Goetz gets on through the rearmost sliding door. He crosses the aisle and takes a seat on the long bench facing the same door. Canty was laying down on the bench alongside the right side of the same door. Allen was seated on the short bench on the other side of the same door. Ramseur and Cabey were on the same side of the train as Bernie right of the door next to the conductors cab. As the the doors whooshed shut, the train pulls out increasing its speed on the express track heading towards the next stop at Chambers Street. The train passes local stations Christopher and Houston. Somewhere near Canal Street, Canty asks Bernie 'How you doing?" Bernie responds "Fine." Then the four men give signals to each other and Canty and Allen get up and go to the left of Bernie blocking him off from the other passengers on the train. Canty then demanded "Give me five dollars!" "I'll give ya five!" Gotez stands up pulls a Smith & Wesson Model 38. An aluminum-framed, carbon steel cylinder and barreled, 5-shot revolver loaded with 38 Specials. He fires four quick shots. The first shot hits Canty in the chest, shot two gets Allen in the back as he's trying to get away from that crazy mother ****. Shot three goes through Ramseur's arm and into his side. The fourth shot missed Cabey standing in the corner by the conductors cab. It deflects off the wall. Cabey sits down. Gotez pauses, looks over the carnage sees that Cabey was still functioning either tells him tells him or thinks to himself, "You seem to be all right, here's another," and shoots him with his last shot. The rest of the passengers, terrified, knock over two women and run to the end of the car and through the connecting doors between. Train stops in the tunnel. The two women on the floor of the car were immobilized by fear. Goetz walks over to them to see if they were OK. The conductor arrives and Goetz tells him that "They tried to rob me." The conductor asks Goetz if he is a police officer. Goetz tells him no. Gotez then jumps to the tracks and runs South along the tunnel to Chambers Street. He heads up to the sidewalk and hurries for home. There, he packs a bag rents a car and splits for Bennington. Vermont. He gets rid of the gun, burns his blue jacket, he drives around New England hiding out in dive motels and paying cash. On December 29, Goetz calls his neighbor, Myra Friedman. She tells him the police are looking for him. He tells Myra his side of the story. "Myra, in a situation like this, your mind, you're in a combat situation. Your mind is functioning. You're not thinking in a normal way. Your memory isn't even working normally. You are so hyped up. Your vision actually changes. Your field of view changes. Your capabilities change. What you are capable of changes. You are under adrenaline, a drug called adrenaline. And you respond very quickly, and you think very quickly. That's all. ... You think! You think, you analyze, and you act. And in any situation, you just have to think more quickly than your opposition. That's all. You know. Speed is very important." Goetz hits the city on December 30th. He returns the rental, picks up some clothes, rents another car and heads appropriately to Concord, New "Live Free or Die" Hampshire to give himself up. Goetz was charged with attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment, and several firearms offenses. A jury found him not guilty of all charges except for one count of carrying an unlicensed firearm. Goetz served eight months of a one-year sentence. "Bernhard Goetz said that three years earlier in 1981, while transporting electronic equipment, he was attacked in the Canal Street subway station by three youths in an attempted robbery.The attackers smashed Goetz into a plate-glass door and threw him to the ground, permanently injuring his chest and knee. Goetz assisted an off-duty officer in arresting one of them; the other two attackers escaped. Goetz was angered when the arrested attacker spent less than half the time in the police station spent by Goetz himself, and he was angered further when this attacker was charged only with criminal mischief for ripping Goetz's jacket. Goetz subsequently applied for a permit to carry a concealed handgun, on the basis of routinely carrying valuable equipment and large sums of cash, but his application was denied for insufficient need. He bought a 5-shot .38-caliber revolver during a trip to Florida. The incident sparked a nationwide debate on race and crime in major cities, the legal limits of self-defense, and the extent to which the citizenry could rely on the police to secure their safety. Goetz, dubbed the "Subway Vigilante" by the New York press, came to symbolize New Yorkers' frustrations with the high crime rates of the 1980s. He was both praised and vilified in the media and public opinion. The incident has also been cited as a contributing factor to the groundswell movement against urban crime and disorder, and the successful National Rifle Association campaigns to loosen restrictions on the concealed carrying of firearms. (1984 New York City Subway shooting - Wikipedia) So obviously you got to ask was Bernie Goetz influenced by Death Wish? Directed by Michael Winner who directed two of the great Charles Bronson post Once Upon A Time In The West Westerns,/ Lawman (1971), and Chato's Land (1972). Death Wish was based on the novel Death Sentence by Brian Garfield, the screenplay was written by Wendell Mayes, Gerald Wilson (uncredited) , and Michael Winner (uncredited). Cinematography was by Arthur J. Ornitz known for The Pusher (1960), Rod Serling's Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), and Serpico (1973). The Music was by Herbie Hancock best known as a piano player, jazz star, and a composer, Round Midnight (1986). The film stars 1950's noir vet Charles Bronson (The People Against O'Hara (1951), The Mob(1951), Crime Wave (1953), Big House, U.S.A. (1955) and Man with a Camera TV Series (1958–1960)) as Paul Kersey, Hope Lange (Bus Stop (1956)) as Joanna Kersey, Kathleen Tolan as Carol Toby, Vincent Gardenia (Cop Hater (1958), Murder, Inc. (1960), Mad Dog Coll (1961), Moonstruck (1987)) as NYPD Lt. Frank Ochoa, William Redfield as Samuel "Sam" Kreutzer, Steven Keats as Jack Toby, Stuart Margolin (Kelly's Heroes (1970), The Rockford Files TV Series (1974–1980)) as Ames Jainchill, Jeff Goldblum as "Jughead" Freak #1, Olympia Dukakis (Moonstruck (1987)) as Cop at the precinct, and 1974 Manhattan. Queensboro Bridge Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson) Paul Kersey is an architect living on the upper West Side ofn Manhattan with his wife Joanna. One day Joanna and his married daughter Carol are followed home from D'Agostino's market by three punks. Jeff Goldblum is billed as Freak # 1 he wears a hat like Jughead does in the old Archie Comics. I'll call him Jughead. Joanna (Hope Lange) and Carol (Kathleen Tolan) Jughead (Jeff Goldblum) lt. Note don't ever have your groceries delivered. The punks know the address from the grocery receipt. They pretend to be the delivery boy. They ring the bell. Carol opens the door. Mayhem ensues. The women only have seven dollars between them. Jughead and his buds beat the **** out of Joanna and orally rape Carol. When Paul gets the call he heads to the hospital to find out that Joanna has died from her injuries. His daughter is suffering from what we now call PTSD. Shortly after the funeral Paul gazing out his apartment window watches as a gang of punks break into a car on his street. He decides to protect himself with two rolls of quarters in the toe of a sock. It proves handy as he uses it to smack a mugger upside his head. Paul's boss sends him to work on a project in Arizona. There he meets Ames Jainchill who invites him to his gun club. There, Paul gets to shoot various handguns. Jainchill is impressed with Paul's accuracy. Paul tells him he was an avid hunter as a kid until he dad was killed in a hunting accident. Ames Jainchill (Stewart Margolin) Pleased with Paul's work on his real estate project Ames' gives Paul a revolver as a thank you present. Back in Manhattan Paul finds out that his daughter has become catatonic. Paul loads the revolver and takes a stroll along a walking path in Riverside Park. He gets mugged at gunpoint. Paul, turning towards his attacker has his gun out and blasts the mugger. It turns out he's an ex con. Paul is in shock but gets over it quickly. The next night he heads out again dispatching violent criminals in the act all around the city. NYPD Lt. Frank Ochoa is put in charge of investigating the vigilante killings. The squad gathers a list of suspects based on their having a family member recently murdered by muggers who are also war veterans. NYPD Lt. Frank Ochoa (Vincent Gardenia) They get the war vet idea from the eye witness accounts of the vigilante's accuracy. As a consequence of the vigilante activity, crime statistics show a dramatic drop in muggings. Paul is on the list. Soon Ochoa suspects that Paul is their man. However the police commissioner does not want to make Paul a martyr. He doesn't want the publicity he just wants Paul to go away. Noirsville Of course the film was panned by many critics because of it showing vigilantism in a good light. Author Garfield was so disappointed in the 1974 film adaption that he wrote the sequel Death Sentence the following year. Nice New York City locations, with a controversial and interesting story 7/10 More screenshots in Noirsville
  14. cigarjoe

    Recently watched Noir

    Appointment with Danger (1951) Director, Lewis Allen with Alan Ladd, Phyllis Calvert, Paul Steward, Jan Sterling, Jack Webb, Stacy Harris, Harry Morgan, David Wolfe, Dan Riss, Geraldine Wall, and George J. Lewis. Great opening sequence of a body disposal in the pouring rain I was hooked from the get go. Also some nice railroad/railyard footage and industrial landscapes of Gary Indiana steel mills. Alan Ladd is Al Goddard, a USPS special investigator sent to Gary, Ind., to solve a postal detective's murder. A young nun Sister Augustine (Phyllis Calvert) is the sole witness. With her aid Ladd learns the identity of the men and uncovers the gang's plot to pull off a million-dollar mail heist. Jan Sterling plays gang leaders floozy jazz loving girlfriend Dodie La Verne. Jack Webb plays a loose cannon creep and Harry Morgan a slow witted goon. Very enjoyable 8/10. Down Three Dark Streets (1954) directed by Arnold Laven with Broderick Crawford, Ruth Roman, Martha Hyer, Marisa Pavan, Max Showalter (Niagara), Kenneth Tobey, Gene Reynolds, and William Johnstone. Sort of a police procedural, quasi-documentary, stars Broderick Crawford as FBI Agent John Ripley.When fellow G-man Zack Stewart is murdered, Ripley takes over the trio of cases Stewart had been working on assuming one of them will reveal his killer. This one is also entertaining but its a bit fuzzy in logic with the motives of the actual murderer the connection of why he killed the FBI man and his girlfriend? or whatever she was is never connected. Martha Hyer is a cute mobsters girlfriend. It does have some great location shots of LA and the streetcar system and ends up with a great set piece at the base of the iconic HOLLYWOOD sign. Entertaining, but the lack of plot connection explained above drops this to a 7/10
  15. cigarjoe

    My top 25 movies released before 1960

    A Western List (26) Hell's Heroes (1930) Viva Villa! (1934) The Texas Rangers (1936) 20 Mule Team (1940) The Westerner (1940) Duel in the Sun (1946) My Darling Clementine (1946) Pursued (1947) Blood on the Moon (1948) Red River (1948) The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) Yellow Sky (1948) Colorado Territory (1949) The Gunfighter (1950) Winchester '73 (1950) High Noon (1951) Rawhide (1951) Westward the Women (1951) The Searchers (1956) The Tall T (1957) 3:10 to Yuma (1957) The Bravados (1958) The Law and Jake Wade (1958) Man of the West (1958) Day of the Outlaw (1959) Ride Lonesome (1959)
  16. cigarjoe

    My top 25 movies released before 1960

    Couldn't whittle any further, anyway the Noir list (31). I Wake Up Screaming (1942) Dark Corner (The) (1945) Detour (1945) Scarlet Street (1945) Killers (The) (1946) Desperate (1947) Kiss of Death (1947) Nightmare Alley (1947) Out Of The Past (1947) Act Of Violence (1948) Criss Cross (1949) Crooked Way (The) (1949) Third Man (The) (1949) Set-Up (The) (1949) Window (The) (1949) Asphalt Jungle (The) (1950) Where The Sidewalk Ends (1950) Cry Danger (1951) Narrow Margin (The) (1952) Big Heat (The) (1953) Niagara (1953) Pickup on South Street (1953) Crime Wave (1954) Hell's Half Acre (1954) Bad Day At Black Rock (1955) Killer's Kiss (1955) Kiss Me Deadly (1955) Killing (The) (1956) Touch Of Evil (1958) Odds Against Tomorrow (1959) Two Men In Manhattan (Deux Hommes Dans Manhattan) (1959)
  17. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    I'd like to see if a decent print adds to the appreciation of the cinematography, you just can't tell with that one all the blacks are overly crushed.
  18. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    You know I believe that "Danny Boy" was written after the turn of the century, would be anachronistic during the building of the Union Pacific.
  19. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    Did you see a good print of this? The online offering is horrible. It's entertaining enough, and quite noirish, liked the stylistic sequence in the warehouse. agree 7/10
  20. cigarjoe

    My Favorite 25 movies released AFTER 1960

    You can't really, you could probably come up with 3-6 most every year.
  21. cigarjoe

    MUSIC THAT INFLUENCED "ME" GROWING-UP

    I must have been 6/7/8 years old
  22. Originally posted in Noir Alley thread but it should have it's own. Ok watched episode one on TNT. Two stories so far circa mid 60s. An independent junkie "paparazzi" who works as a sort low rent WeeGee sneaks into the L.A. morgue and takes a picture of what looks like a pretty gruesome corpse. He gets caught, gets beat up by the cops and thrown into a squad car with a black man. A "trick baby" in Sparks, Nevada finds out that the woman she thought was her mother isn't. She works after school as a cleaning gal in a Catholic Hospital and she sneaks in to get her sealed records. She finds out that her grandfather is a prominent L.A. Doctor. She phones him and he invites her to visit. She splits for The City Of Angels. The teaser sequences alluding of things to come in L.A. seem a bit kinky. Well filmed, but of course broken up at least 3-4 times for commercials. I'll watch episode two. PS Had to listen/watch to some god awful Stars Wars spin off type crap wait for it to start.
  23. cigarjoe

    Archaic Expressions in Films

    Put that in your pipe and smoke it. Breeze Drift Dangle, sister Grab a cloud Nix Drop a dime Jimmied the lock Pin money Play ball
  24. cigarjoe

    I Just Watched...

    I give it a 7/10 for the highly interesting ending at the spooky looking half sunken resort on the Salton Sea.
  25. cigarjoe

    MUSIC THAT INFLUENCED "ME" GROWING-UP

    The beauty of the internet. Did a search and found it. My first radio below was a GE 678 they started making them in 1956 mine was aqua colored like the one below but it also had a leather case with an over the shoulder strap. I can remember taking it to Astoria Park and sitting on the grass with my folks and watching the heavy traffic going through the treacherous Hell Gate on the East River, ships, tugs pulling various barges or lashed to car floats fought the currents pretty dramatically at times with some close calls. I can remember also taking it with me to the South shore beaches, Jones Beach and Robert Moses or once in a while to Sunken Meadow on the North shore. The tunes I recall that I first heard over this little baby.... "At a time when bikini bathing suits were still seen as too risqué to be mainstream, the song prompted a sudden take off in bikini sales and is credited as being one of the earliest contributors to the acceptance of the bikini in society. The early 1960s saw a slew of surf movies and other film and television productions that rapidly built on the song's momentum." (Wikipedia)

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us