JackFavell

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Everything posted by JackFavell

  1. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    It made me feel like I was going insane!
  2. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I had trouble the other day in this thread, the site kept bumping me back to page 1 or 2, even when I tried to read further back to get that same list. At the bottom of the page it would say page 7 or 8, but I kept getting the same posts over again from page one. It was very confusing. I finally closed the tab and went completely out of the site, which seemed to reset it. Frustrating!
  3. JackFavell

    The Cossacks Cancelled!

    TCM always reschedules the films that are bumped from the lineup due to tributes. It more than likely won't be in March, but further down the road since they schedule about two months in advance. I am quite sure they will be showing The Cossacks in the next few months. It's great that you are posting your strong feelings about silent films though...TCM Programmer DOES look at this website and pays attention to your requests. Just keep on supporting silents by writing in the threads down here.
  4. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Don't hide! But I know how you feel, it can be overwhelming.
  5. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Maven - I loved how you edited it together! It WAS brilliant! I loved the two letters from the two different scenes. I also loved the way you had younger Bogie and older Bogie kind of melding. And Ricardo biting Loretta's fingers, switching to John Hodiak tempting poor Frances Gifford to eat out of his hands. Perfect! And the two couch scenes.... I love how the shadows seem to tell the story of your video. Something I just noticed this time through was the way you have a string of women, I think starting with Norma Shearer lying back on her bed, with her arms running through her hair... and then Ella Raines and maybe 5 others giving sly looks...ending with Bette and her gun from *The Letter.* It snuck up on me how well those images went together...but then you top it by editing Bette looking down and Burt Lancaster looking UP, as if they were occupying the same space. Oh, it just made my heart leap! Wonderful.
  6. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    It's so true, Chris, being sick, especially with a fever can totally mess up your take on a film. I remember watching the BeeGees Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band when I had my tonsils out. It didn't get any better when I got healthy.
  7. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Gosh, I don't know what to say, guys. You all move me to tears. I just wanted all of you to know how much I appreciate you, each of you for your great individual and collective gifts. And also how glad I am that you are here, my friends. You are the people that I feel closest to - the connection being our shared love of classic film. That's all. Love you.
  8. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Laffite, I didn't want to jump in until after you had seen all of Roman Holiday. I wanted so badly to scream through the computer, "KEEP WATCHING! KEEP WATCHING! It gets better, really it does! It's so worth sticking with it." I'm SO GLAD you watched all the way through, and were able to get to that last scene. It wins you over, that movie. Gosh,just your posting that line makes me get a lump in my throat. When I first saw it, I did not like Gregory Peck at all as an actor. I saw the film for the first time when I was very much under the weather, quite ill in fact, and everything about it struck me wrong. All the comic elements of Peck's character, especially the scene where he tries to take the little girl's camera turned to creepiness bordering on pedophilia in my feverish state. The hair cutting scene was unbearable! I felt she was being attacked! I waited a long long time before I had the nerve to watch the film again, but I did about 4 years ago, and found not the creepy film I had watched so long ago, but a beautiful love-redemption story. Your words about the end bring back the choking feeling I have every time I watch. It's so powerful to me, that wordless connection between the two, that I will always swear that actor Gregory Peck truly loved Audrey Hepburn and nothing anyone could say will ever dissuade me from that thought. This was the first film in which I really liked Peck and it has helped me through other movies of his. Now I can say there are a few really stand out roles for me by this actor, which I couldn't have said if I hadn't seen the movie. When I watch it now, I don't even think about someone else playing the role, and I actually like Peck as a poor, unscrupulous newsman. But I still can't watch that camera scene without cringing. I also absolutely love the sweet barber who cut her hair, then asks her out to the dance. He's so adorable I always kind of wish they got together. The movie from that dance scene on is perfection. The scene where Audrey has her panic attack is incredible, you really feel the agony pouring out of this girl, how confining and restrictive her regimented life is for her sensitive soul, it's as if she were in a straitjacket being squeezed tighter and tighter. I really sympathize greatly with her longing to be free.
  9. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Thanks Reyman. You all mean so much to me.
  10. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    *Arizona (1940)* *Blondes at Work (1938)* *Borderline (1950)* *British Intelligence (1940)* *Brother Orchid (1940)* *The Catered Affair (1956)* *Charlie Chan in Honolulu (1938)* *Crisis (1950)* *Desire (1936)* *The Diary of a Chambermaid (1946)* *Fanny (1932)* *The File on Thelma Jordon (1950)* *Forever Amber (1943)* *I'm No Angel (1933)* *Johnny Eager (1941)* *Maisie Was a Lady (1941)* *The Man from Monterey (1933)* *The Moon Is Blue (1953)* *Never Let Me Go (1953)* *Our Vines Have Tender Grapes (1945)* *Rachel and the Stranger (1948)* *Ride Out for Revenge (1957)* *The Rules of the Game (1939)* *The Sandpiper (1965)* *Scandal at Scourie (1953)* *The Secret Fury (1950)* *Smart Money (1931)* *Texas (1941)* *The Texas Rangers Ride Again (1940)* *That Uncertain Feeling (1941)* *There's Always Tomorrow (1956)* *Thunder Road (1958)* *West of Shanghai (1937)* *A Woman of Paris (1923)* *A Woman's Face (1941)* *You Gotta Stay Happy (1948)* My top sixteen (just to be perverse, and because these are the ones I like best): 1. A Woman of Paris 2. The Rules of the Game 3. Fanny 4. Desire 5. A Woman's Face 6. Maisie Was a Lady 7. Forever Amber 8. Our Vines Have Tender Grapes 9. Rachel and the Stranger 10. The Man from Monterey 11. Brother Orchid 12. There's Always Tomorrow 13. The Catered Affair 14. Blondes at Work 15. Johnny Eager 16. The Sandpiper My picks for your top ten: OK. I just tried to pick and I can't come up with a decision for this list! Everything depends, and I just can't get a feel for how you would like or dislike these. Here's what I've come up with: 1. The Rules of the Game after that it's anyone's guess. I THINK you'll like The File on Thelma Jordon, but I realize that after all these years of thinking I've seen it, I haven't. I THINK you'll like *A Woman of Paris,* but I have really nothing to go on with this guess except that I found it to be so very modern and sophisticated, but with a huge compassionate heart. I enjoyed how the couples worked - she could live with Adolphe Menjou - in fact, their relationship was pretty wonderful, but she didn't love him. The boy she loved just couldn't get together with her, their relationship was so messy, but she LOVED him. I find that such an interesting comment on love, rather European, kind of like some of the foreign films we've discussed here lately. For me it's pert near a perfect film. But I don't know if it will rank highly with you because it was not really a love story, per se. I think you will like *A Woman's Face* a great deal but then I know your liking for a strong ending, and for me, the ending is pretty weak compared to the beginning. There's still enough momentum from the start of the film to keep it going for me, but I don't know if you will see it as a cop out, or an MGM glossing over of a deep subject that could have been great. I am just impressed with Joan's performance, especially at the start. I think you'll like *The Catered Affair,* just because it has such remarkable acting, and Bette is really playing a different type of character here. But it might be too painful a film for you to really like. There's Always Tomorrow was a really big surprise for me... I didn't expect to like this film as much as I did. It really is a hidden gem. But again, it doesn't really seem like your kind of movie. Forever Amber I have fond feelings for, and I think you'll like it's sexiness, and it has Linda Darnell for goodness sakes! But it is a bodice ripper, and maybe it will seem silly to you, so I'm left with doubt as to your liking of it. I think you'll like the naughtiness of *I'm No Angel,* but the plot is slim... and some people don't like Mae, so not sure. I think you will like The Sandpiper, because it's about relationships, but then most people think this one is for the birds.... I think you will like *Johnny Eager,* but I don't know if it will appeal with it's slick MGM look or not. Westward the Women and The Last Hunt were my introduction to the darker side of Robert Taylor. I think this one would appeal to you as noirish/gangster/romance, but.... And on and on.... I just don't know. Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 10, 2014 10:44 AM
  11. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Chris, you make me blush right to my roots! Thank you so much for the complement on my writing. I don't think you know what it means to me. But it makes me very embarrassed to be ranked among the ramblers here who are all such great writers. Each of you has his/her own style that totally works and is a great pleasure to read. Frank and Ro are conversationalists, and I think in some ways that's the hardest way to write, writers spend YEARS trying to get to the simplicity and grace of your styles - to sound natural when typing? I think it's wonderful. Frank is very organized, and his caps always perfectly describe the film he's watching. I think your writing is fantastic, because you not only can show that you get choked up or moved by a movie, you also show WHY. You combine a feel for the style of a movie with an ability to talk about the feelings it evokes. It's a great joy to read you, and I love the way you tease - just not if we're talking about Wagon Master. Frank, along with Chris and Laffite, is the kindest of the ramblers, and he will always be the white knight of the group, willing to help rescue someone from a technical issue, or a troll. Ro is conversational and the most good-natured. We are very much alike in that 'jumble' she speaks of... I have a very hard time ranking films, and it always makes me feel uncomfortable to organize my thoughts. But I think there is something rather wonderful about the random-ness up there! It's always a surprise what's going to come out of that junk drawer upstairs! So I would give it to Ro for being the most surprising of the ramblers. She makes me laugh the most. I admire her for her ability to speak her mind and her strength of character. She and I are most similar in our feelings about those good 'bad' men. Chris, you denigrate yourself too often, when the reality is that you get to the heart of things better than anyone. You can zero in on something that no one else thought of, and you are able to cut down what might come out too flowery if the subject were in my hands. I'd call you the Hemingway of the boards. You are also a rescuer. I share a love of comedy with you, I don't know what I'd do without my L&H buddy. Thank goodness for you. Bronxgirl and Sansfin are both very clever, witty writers. You make me gasp sometimes at your facility with words. Bronxie has her eye on the psychological and can really ferret out the hypocritical, slicing it to ribbons, and yet she loves costume films, and is basically a romantic. Sansfin is twisty, very ironic, and wry, which I love. She's like the screwball comedy in our group, or a twisted comedy like Daisies. She's an absurdist. I wish my brain were as quick witted as both of yours. Both of you still manage to keep the heart in your posts. MissG is a wonderful writer. She combines great wit with great romanticism, which is a strange and beautiful combination. She and I are very alike in our choices of doomed love in film, but MissG is far greater at describing her choices succinctly, with great spirituality and feeling. She amazes me with her jumps right over my head to profound conclusions that wouldn't have occurred to me for years. CineMaven is such a rollicking good read! She is the queen of the shock laugh, which I love. It makes for really exciting posts. For me, she discovers her movies in her posts, describing what happened the best, and how it made her feel. She's hilarious, but her deep love of film just shines out of her posts. She makes me laugh with delight at her double entendres. She likes to delve and is the most curious of the ramblers... asking questions when others (like me) might just go on to talk about themselves. She and Frank are the ones most likely to ask someone else their opinion. Laffite has such an inquiring mind... I love how he thinks out loud, coming to some surprising and infinitely deep conclusions. He's able to figure something out through the process of his writing. He is kind hearted, behind that swashbuckling cutthroat disguise of his. I think he's got the best taste, and he's never afraid to tackle a film that might seem hard to get into or confusing to someone else. His mind is razor sharp for detail, and I have so enjoyed having him back because he has revitalized our conversations. He also has such a blast watching and writing and conversing with everyone, I really appreciate the 'fun' and charm of his comments. Molo is another inquiring mind, mixed with surprising leaps to some real deep philosophical points. He can also be surprisingly sophisticated. I love his willingness to discuss anything and everything. And he and Chris share a sweetness that is very touching. I miss him greatly. JamesJazzGuitar is the type to parse out meaning in films, perhaps because of his musical background. He defines his films the way he would attack a musical piece, investigating each bar for meaning. I can't quite get a handle on his writing personality, because he doesn't post much in this thread. He's succinct, doesn't like BS, but when he likes something, he REALLY likes it and can be quite eloquent and passionate about it. Reyman is a lover not a fighter, but watch out if you diss his favorite! Because he loves so deeply, he can be hurt I think by a casual comment or by someone who attacks the community. Reyman is very organized about his favorites. He has a soaring spirit but likes to pinpoint his films, developing the why of his likes. He is the grand in films, and at the same time he is the very small detail. kingrat is a detail oriented fellow, he can note the smallest moment in a film that others might pass over. He is obsessive sometimes, but in a good way - he likes to move through a director's entire work before claiming anything about them. When he loves something, he throws everything away for that love. He's a romantic at heart, but he can talk very well about mise-en-scene. When it comes to movies he adores he can speak eloquently. He is striving to learn at all times (like most of the ramblers) and his points about direction are invaluable. Buttertea is the heart an soul of movies to me. She is sweetly innocent, and absolutely unafraid to love her movies and her friends with all her heart. I wish I could be as kind and caring and joyful as she is. Oh dear, I hope I haven't forgotten anyone. I just want to tell you ALL that you give my life such a lift, that you really take it to the next level in your writing, every one of you - striving for the next level, even if it's in an easygoing, joking manner. I enjoy reading every comment, each for different reasons. You are MY COMMUNITY, all different, like the colors of the rainbow. I love each and every one of you very much. Oh and Ro, if you can make it past the first 15 minutes of *The African Queen*, it changes course, so to speak, so you might find it more palatable after that initial set up. Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 10, 2014 9:41 AM Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 10, 2014 9:47 AM
  12. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    *This is probably wrong but I feel sorry for her. She leaves Marcello with whom she had a spontaneous, baggage-free, and emerging love relationship, to go and CLING (which is what happens when you wait that long) to a stranger SHE DOESN?T EVEN KNOW. It made me feel that perhaps this movie is about, in part anyway, not knowing what is in our best interest, we insist on fairy tales (mental constructs) rather than what we know and see to be right in front of our noses.* And now see? This is what completely won me over - that idea of the person choosing the fairy tale rather than the reality. I agree, I think her life might be far from good with Marais. He very possibly could leave her again, often or forever. Or perhaps she would have no real connection with him once she was living with him. At least she and Marcello actually had shared moments. Then again, maybe it proved that a love that came from a chance meeting ONCE could actually be fulfilled, could stay forever in BOTH people's hearts. I do like that idea. But the oblique parts of the plot, her choice of the fairy tale over reality, and the idea that she threw away that connection with Marcello for a pie in the sky dream, that's what I found most fascinating about it. The film could be seen in so many ways. Without those open ends, I would not have really appreciated the film so much. I say appreciated even though it made me so mad! I felt just distanced enough from the two at the beginning to fall for their romance by the end. That scene under the bridge was magnifique! It had just the right combination of reality (with the poor folk sleeping under there) and romantic delusion (with the snow coming down). I also liked that the movie drew parallels between Maria and Marcello - they were basically doing exactly the same thing.... He fell for her without any knowledge of her character, he was simply swayed by the romantic moment the same as she was with Marais. Was either of their fantasies more real than the other? Frank, I'll have to reply to your post a little later, but I promise to get to it soon. OY. That game last night! It was by far the WEIRDEST one I've ever seen! I literally couldn't keep track of what was going on for the first 5 minutes, and the announcers were terrible! Even they couldn't tell us what was going on.... and then they made mistakes in their reporting. In the end they even stopped trying to call the plays or say what the decisions were! It was like the Broncos' jitters and complete mis-steps got to them. I started out rooting for the Seahawks because I always go for the underdog. By the end, I felt so sorry for the Broncos, it was killing me. Thank goodness they actually scored some points! For once though, the commercials weren't the highlight for me, since I usually have the losing team. Actually, the commercials were pretty awful, and I HATED that they crammed commercials in at the beginning, it seemed like one play attempt, and then a commercial. Bleaah. I hope fans speak out about that, complain. You can't keep track of a game when it's constantly stopping and starting every minute. It seemed worse this year for some reason. The poor teams are at the mercy of the ads. It should be the other way around. If I see another car commercial, in the next year, it will be too soon. Though I did like the Volkswagen commercial with the wings. Germans are funny. I am notorious for picking losing teams. Now I feel guilty for picking a winner! Edited by: JackFavell on Feb 3, 2014 8:40 AM
  13. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    I really like your reviews of Harriet Craig and Ladies Who Meet, Laffite! You are completely spot on with the two films (Ihaven't seen The Damned Don't Cry yet). Have you seen the originals of both of those movies? It would be interesting to get your impressions of them too. I think Harriet Craig is good, a solid movie with a very good performance by Crawford, who is so well cast. Craig's Wife with Roz Russell also has a top notch performance, but it is surrounded by a really chilling film, so I give the upper hand to it. Somehow, the bite, the scariness is lost in the Crawford version, the blackness of the idea. Maybe because it's a fifties topic? It seems more appropriate to that era. The thirties Craig's Wife is kind of shocking to me. It comes out of nowhere, and is a rather frightening story of house pride gone horribly wrong. Roz is colder than Crawford, if such a thing is possible. I prefer the Crawford version of *When Ladies Meet,* which is odd because I usually go for the pre-codes... but it would be worthwhile to go back and do a re-watch of the movies back to back. I enjoy them all.
  14. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    We are sympatico indeed.
  15. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Thank you Sansfin! I have adopted something similar, opening two tabs myself, so I can read and respond at the same time - I mean, I can copy a sentence from one tab into the reply tab so I don't have to scroll. I could simply refresh the reading tab before I post in order to avoid the problems I run into. But I hate to say I am not always so sharp as to remember to do that each time. We've been putting up with this for so long, I find it fascinating that we all have our ways of getting around the problems. I just got frustrated, because I realized that it isn't so much thinking of a reply that is the hardest part of posting here, it's circumventing the system itself that makes it such work. And I'm very much like Maynard G. Krebs from Dobie Gillis in that the mere mention of the word WORK makes me run away.
  16. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Thanks, dear Chris. I hope I'm not too boring with the long descriptions or questions and answers. I swear sometimes I bore myself!
  17. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Sorry for the rant guys. I just got so frustrated yesterday! Ro, I'll try your trick of opening a new window and then paste-ing. It's the most comfortable for me, and then I don't have to worry about trying to add my photos and bold lettering after I paste. Thanks to both of you for commiserating in my misery. I will be posting anyway, I guess I just wanted someone to know how hard it is to simply reply to someone here. *I'm someone who loves physical comedy, and this has it in spades.* Did you have a favorite scene? *Your sister actually had a copy of it on film? Really? That's impressive! Talk about awesome.* Back then you could get a projector for not too much money, and Blackhawk films for somewhere between 15 and 50 dollars depending on how many reels they had. It was a wonderful gift for her, and when I was a little bit older, my dad got me my own. And oddly enough, our small town library carried many silent films on reels as well, so I could check them out for a couple of weeks and then return them. It was so great. *You said it. I liked all of those gags and pratfalls. And then you add that finale with the heart and you've got a complete film.* Keaton always has a little something to say. He's got the gags, then the story, then the romance, then other kind of big picture stuff going on. Occasionally, he drifts off into complete fantasy as well. He's pretty amazing. Only he and Chaplin bring scope to their comedies. Well later on there was Jacques Tati.... I forget if you've seen his films. *No, I didn't know that. That's simply remarkable. I cannot imagine a performer taking such a chance. But silent films were the wild, wild west of film, without a doubt.* That's a great way to put it, they really were... they'd do anything and everything for their movies. *I always associate this with Italians, for some reason. Maybe it's European. There's a lot of griping and fighting with one's family, be it the wife, the husband, the kids, the extended family. It's a lot of yelling and disapproval followed by hugs and words of love. I guess it's hot-headed emotion.* Which I think we both love in movies, unless it gets completely overdone. *She's the female version of Cesar. She cares about her daughter and wishes her to do what she thinks is right, but in the end, she's still going to be there for her.* I guess her whole demeanor at the beginning made me think she was going to lose it and hit Fanny. It really was so pleasing to find she had more depth than I thought. And you know, it's one thing to talk about a girl who was more or less outside the family, and another when it's your own daughter. Plus times had changed a bit since the aunt had run off and gotten "in the family way". You are right, there is a sophistication to the film and the characters, yet we do still feel them as being blue-collar, everyday folk. You know, in the early thirties, film really made that transition to blue collar so well. Instead of focusing on city slickers and country folk, we got a little more realistic picture of real people living in real places. Over here, we got gangster pics and family dramas, but I don't remember any films here that are as frank with their themes, and yet as lyrical as Marius. *That's exactly it. The store has lost its mind for sending business to their competitors.* We should be so lucky today. We're so jaded, we make Thelma's response look quaint. Thelma is very funny in her small scene. The rest of the cast fits very nicely. I'm a big Jerome Cowan fan, I love his style and dapperness. Here, his exasperation is hilarious to me. Every person in the picture has to decide what's important to him - with Gene Lockhart, it's his career on the line, voters won't vote for 'the man who sent Santa up the river'. With Cowan, he has to pick winning the case, or disillusioning his own son. I love that he picked his son. I also love Porter Hall. No one was as varied in their portrayals as he was as a character actor. He's the one-armed father of the boy who was shot in *Intruder in the Dust,* and he's Jacob Q. Boot in *Ace in the Hole.* You can't get any more different than that and that's just two roles out of the hundreds he did. He's capable of really terrible characters with so much malice. His eyebrow puller psychiatrist is such a horrible person, who can't stand being caught out and psycho-analyzed by Gwenn. He's vindictive because he's on a power trip, not there to help people. What a comment on the field of psychiatry! I agree. I thought Natalie was very sweet and cute. And I usually like kids who are smarter than the adults in films, especially girls. Me too! Like Diana Lynn in Miracle of Morgan's Creek. Favorite character! They do bring credibility to their roles but I really wasn't that interested in either of them, and that's shocking for me to say with Maureen. That IS shocking. I'm telling her! She's going to slap you silly. *They are very similar. I do prefer Holiday Affair because I like the romance in that film more. But both films are very good.* I didn't really like Holiday Affair until this year when I finally sat down and watched it straight through. It's a really hidden gem. I've also noticed this year that Janet Leigh is a terrific actress. But Mitchum really gets me in this picture. I have a strange problem with Wendell Corey.... he's a really good actor but I stay away from his movies like the plague because he's not traditionally good looking. I have to think twice about that, because I haven't seen one movie of his where he wasn't good. Just never really liked his personality. *You've got it. Who are the crazy ones?* It's wonderful that film can so bring us into a character's world that we turn what we normally think upside down. *I actually know some Panther Women. * Like who for instance? *It really is an uneasy kind of film.* I'll say! I can't think of any except *Freaks* that goes more uncomfortable places than this one. *I thought you only liked it because of Joe! * That IS why I gave it another look. And I discovered that I liked it tremendously. I may be the only person who actually likes the idea of riches that drive men mad, and make them do evil. I really like that part of the film, partly because of the really good acting by Calleia, Qualen and I think the third guy is Frank Puglia. Poor John Qualen... first danced to death by Belle, then driven mad with gold fever in the Jungle Book! *Not really. The story isn't the strongest, but the presentation of the story is gorgeous. It's rather mesmerizing. I loved seeing the animals.* I like the kind of Tarzan story, where the more magical jungle has to be left alone, the mere presence of humans destroys what makes it special. *I liked that a lot, too. I actually didn't know who the beggar was.* I didn't either at first, and I was looking for him! This was supposedly Joe's favorite of his own films. And no wonder, he got more than six lines... *That was beautifully expressed. I definitely agree with your sentiment. I love Sabu's freshness and charisma. He just pulls you in. He's as thrilling as the adventures.* His reactions are priceless. I can't imagine playing such free spirits without feeling a little foolish, but he's got such natural style he really represents nature, and it works. I think he did some serials, because I remember Sabu being on TV a lot when I was a kid. I do like Danny Kaye when he's just acting. I think he's really funny. He's very good at silly reactions. Did you like any of the fantasy sections? I like how they are all somewhat similar, play on themes he goes back to over and over again. *I still can't picture Bogie as a frightened father! And Spence as a hood? Well, maybe I could see that. He can get intense and threatening.* I know, that's why I'd like to see it! Because you know Bogie would do at least a good job, so I think it would be fun to see him like that. Of course, he kind of did play that kind of observer part in *Key Largo*... *I definitely like Cry Terror! the best of the three films you mentioned. I'm not a fan of Suddenly, though. I prefer The Desperate Hours to that.* Cry Terror is really terrific. It's funny, I thought The Desparate Hours was the weakest. Maybe because I am not the biggest Fredric March fan. I like him OK, but there are only a handful of movies where I think he's great. I haven't seen Suddenly or TDH recently, I'd have to look at them back to back to really compare. It's not a great film. I wanted so badly to like it, it seemed so odd, a noir with Deanna Durbin and Gene Kelly. Maybe it will hit me differently if I actually make it through. Mickey Rooney is really reserved and quite good in Drive a Crooked Road. You have to like "sap" films, though. Oh I think I can handle that. Have you seen him in The Last Mile? He's really good in that one. another later performance that works well. *You have to respect such great honesty.* Gabin is always brutally honest in his acting. I'm beginning to love him. One gets the idea he never lies to himself. That's what makes him so tremendously attractive. *And I'm hoping to get that one this year. It's one of the biggest films I've yet to see.* I know that musicals aren't your thing, but I do think you will enjoy it. Don't want to spoil anything by saying too much. You described that well. It's true, the dance keeps picking up steam. It matched the audacity of the dance. Boy, you almost get the idea of how shocking and yet playful it was back when it was introduced. I love the connection to Renoir's father too. *She had a very restrained and innocent view of herself and life to start until she entered the world of performance art. With experience, her desires changed.* I was SO glad she didn't go the route of most Hollywood films. It would have been sad if she had to pay for going with Gabin, or if she had chosen the boy, simply because of some need to neatly wrap it up. I like Renoir the best because he's messy. He leaves people in messy situations that have no intelligent solution. * Gabin was a great surprise in this one. Not just his character's actions, but he, himself, the actor. I liked seeing this other side of Gabin.* I was so shocked at the beginning, when he danced. I was like, "OK.... Frank says this is a good movie.... but JEAN GABIN dancing? Where the heck is this movie going? This could be AWFUL." But he did it so well and with such aplomb, I bought it by the end of the dance and that's where I really started to get into the film. I think you'll appreciate that one. It's not going to match French Cancan, but it's going to make you smile. It's all about Anna Magnani. She's great. She was great, though I felt the film stumbled a few times, I can't put my finger on it, but it didn't grab me like French Cancan. I had to work to watch it. But that ending! Superb! *I know I mentioned the film to you in a private message. But I haven't watched it yet.* Oh yeah, it was you who mentioned it. I may not be able to get to it for a day or so. I did watch Le Notti Bianche. A BEAUTIFUL beautiful film. OMG, the lighting was to die for, and I loved the little village set, everything about the movie. And although I balked when Marcello said he was shy, he acted that role perfectly. Both of them were fantastic. There was such nuance, and an air of unreality to the while thing. It makes you wonder whether love is even real. But I have to say, I almost threw my remote control through my screen when she went back with Jean Marais. I was so mad.
  18. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Chris, I find it almost the straw that breaks the camel's back - it's hard enough to post here as it is, it's such a CHORE with the website signing you out before you get done writing, and then deleting what you wrote. Now they've added that 'leave page' box every time I write a sentence? It's like a slap in the face every time it comes up. I thought it was maybe my computer giving me that message, except it doesn't do it on any other site. I post here less and less, and I find that it makes me tired even thinking about replying to someone, so I let it go, procrastinate about it, because I just really don't want to use the TCM website. I'm sorry to complain. I am a slow writer. I am not a quick wit, nor am I one of those curmudgeons who do nothing but complain about TCM, quite the contrary, I am a cheerleader for the company. But really it's like they PUNISH you more and more for continuing to post here at the TCM message boards. I miss the good old fashioned days when we could post between several people back and forth without too much trouble, and you could actually edit what you wrote in preview BEFORE posting... that is if the website didn't delete it first. I am glad they simplified the posting page, but they took away the 2 good things it had going for it, the preview and the ability to quote, and they added something that doesn't even make sense - "leave the page" or "Stay on page". Every upgrade has gotten worse since 2007 when I started here. If it weren't for a few friends who post here, I would NOT find it worth the time and trouble. When I post, this is what I have to do, each and every time I want to reply: I hit reply, find that I'm not signed in, go to the top of the page as it takes time for TCM to log on, wait for several seconds, right click on the back button, find the thread I was reading, click it to get back to the thread, scroll to the post I was reading, hit the reply button again, get into the reply box, take a lot of time to write something because I want to answer each part of the post, but sometimes I've forgotten to copy and paste what the person has written first, since there is no quote button anymore. I proofread my post, adding in any bold highlights or italics in order to clarify the quotes, hit post, wait for a minute for the 'leave this page' box to appear, hit 'leave page', and then I find that they've logged me out already because I took too much time. I then go to the top of my computer screen AGAIN, right click on the back button, find the name of the reply I wrote, click it, look to see if it's still there. Sometimes it's not and I lay my head down and bang it on my desk. If it is, I scroll down to the bottom of the page, hit post message again, and it asks me if I want to leave the page....so I click leave page again and wait to see if my post has gone through, because it never tells me if I have posted or not, it just says it's connecting for ten minutes. So, I open a new tab, go to the thread I wanted to post in, see if my post has actually gone through. If it has, I close the window that says it's still connecting, and then I close the new window, and I wait to see if someone replied. IF I'm lucky and it didn't delete the whole thing...in which case I have to rewrite my reply, going through all these steps over again, which takes an hour. I know most people write in WORD or some other backup, but I actually like to write my posts on the page I am going to post on. Call me crazy.... it doesn't feel so much like a term paper when I try to write to friends here instead of in a completely separate closed off program. Even if I do write in WORD, I have to come back and paste it, then make sure I've got the bold and italicized stuff in place, photos posted correctly, etc. I just don't have the kind of time on my hands to waste fifteen minutes to an hour every time I want to make a comment. So sue me for complaining. I think this problem is a disgrace for a company that serves it's customers so well in every other aspect of it's business. It would be funny if it were in a movie. Every time I post at TCM, I feel like poor Neva Petterson in *Desk Set* as EMERAC spews out punch cards, melts down and explodes. It's the worst website I've ever been on, and it's been like this forever, getting more and more difficult each year, with complaints coming in for YEARS. The sad thing is, it's worse for so many others than it is for me. I apologize to my friends for this rant, I don't want to start anything. I hope in fact that everyone here will just ignore this, except for maybe TCM STAFF MEMBERS. I just finally realized why I've spent less and less time here over the last 2 years with my old buddies. This is why. I thought it was because I felt tired, or I didn't have anything worth contributing lately, or I was brain dead, or I didn't feel like writing. But I realize suddenly that it's the daunting task of trying to post here. I'll continue to work hard to talk to you, my friends. I am not going to say another word about it in any of these threads. I just felt I HAD to get it off my chest, because I really feel strongly about it. I felt strongly years ago when we first tried to get something done about the crappy way this website is run. Sorry to stop conversation. If TCM staffers had to communicate or work this way, they would be losing money every day because nothing would get done. There would be no TCM, and they would fire the company providing the poor web service. It's appalling to me that after 7 years the website is even more difficult to work on than it was before. So TCM, if you want fans to hang around and really enjoy posting here, and you want fans to think that TCM is the bomb, maybe you could actually fix it, including the preview and quote buttons, but leaving out all these other steps I've mentioned. Because really I should only have to hit a button once to post something. Just a suggestion for the company that really listens to it's fans. Except HERE. Fed Up. beyond Fed Up. Thinking about deleting this post but I am not going to because someone has to say these things.
  19. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    No sermon, just trying to help, I know. At least for me, the punctuation doesn't work if I have used the BOLD or the HIGHLIGHT symbols next to the period or exclamation point or whatever. That's my main trouble with the site. And now I also have a box that opens after I hit the post message key that asks me if I want to leave the page or not. What a pain in the neck. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 29, 2014 11:47 AM
  20. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    *Boy, are we ever in a similar spot. I'm also fighting a nasty head cold. I haven't been able to taste food for three days. I could actually eat Quiet Gal's cooking! I can finally breathe through my nose today.* Perhaps you'd do well to eat something healthy made by our Rohanaka! Some chicken soup and some greens for the vitamins would do you good, Mr. sawdust and saurkraut! I'm only teasing. I do hope you are feeling better today, it was miserable, the way we felt here, but I was lucky that it only lasted for a couple days and I didn't get a cold with it. Alice had it for only 24 hours. Oh to be young again! Drink plenty of water and soup and orange juice if you can. *And if you are looking to watch French films, you are to watch *Le Notti Bianche*!* I saw that it was on this morning and missed it! I guess I have to find the disc! I don't know why I have such a block about watching this movie! *I've had The Rules to the Game on DVD since July but I hadn't watched it yet. Your post prompted me to do so. I have also fallen for Jean Renoir. I think he's a brilliant director, one of my new favorites.* Me too. The movie hit me so hard on a serious note that I forgot to mention how funny it was also. Very pleasurable as a comedy and you know how much I like 1930's comedies. And somehow, the tragic ending works perfectly well, because there are telegraphs throughout the movie that something is just going horribly wrong, getting darker. I've been reading reviews now that I watched it. They are almost as fascinating as the movie itself, since every single person who wrote about it, from critics to famous directors, has a different take on what the tragedy is or what makes the film great. *I think you make valid points about a bad print, small screen, and life experience being detriments to liking a film such as The Rules of the Game. I can tell you that I would not have liked it about ten years ago. It has taken my experience in classic film to appreciate and enjoy films like this. In fact, I actually saw a film very similar to this last year, that being Luis Bunuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie. Bunuel was clearly inspired by Jean Renoir's film. And if you haven't seen Bunuel's film, I do recommend it to you.* I definitely would not have gotten so much out of this film if my eye hadn't been trained by you Ramblers here at the TCM boards. I have a block about Bunuel too for some reason. I've resisted watching him. I have to get to know someone on my own I guess. It's foolish how stubborn I can be sometimes. I always resisted any music or tv shows that were too popular. Bunuel is always talked about by the intelligentsia, critics who want to show off how much they know. The reason I resisted has nothing to do with him,... it's just that I hear his name and think "pretentious" because of the way critics talk about him. Ridiculous. I should know better. I'll give him a try since you mention him, and since I have this free video thing going on. *I thought it was mostly that. It's about the uncaring, selfishness of people, especially those with money and power.* Now see, I would debate that. A lot of people say the same thing, but I don't see any difference at all between the rich and the working class in this film. Maybe that's what ticked off so many people when it opened. The maids and servants are just as bad as the upper class. Are they mimicking those they work for? have those wealthy few corrupted the common man? I tend to think not.... money or comfort is the corrupting influence, certainly but the rich are not more selfish than the poor here. They are all equally screwed up! As we all are. Marceau the poacher is as contemptible a human being as you can get.... and he has nothing. He doesn't have to poach another man's wife. It's rather funny that I like him so much. *You know, I didn't think of any of that while watching the film, but what you say can be found. Today's world is full of selfishness. Everyone is all right with things when it's how they want it. But if it doesn't match their own wants and desires, it's wrong. "It's okay for me to do what I do, but you cannot do that to me." We really do live in a mirror-less society.* That's very good, a mirror-less society. Is art the mirror? Is it different from 1939 right now? I'm not so sure, and that's a scary, scary thought. Sometimes I feel we too are dancing on the brink of a volcano, just as those in Europe were doing in 1939, not seeing the brink of world war. And now that I think about this theme in *The Rules of the Game*, perhaps it isn't even money that is the corruptor... I think perhaps it's WANT. Want of what you don't have... want of more things, want of someone else, want of a better life, the longing for love but only on our terms - like Christine and Andre - they both wanted love, but only on their own terms. He wanted her to fling her life aside, even as he publicly berated her. He wanted her to fling aside the RULES OF THE GAME. And she wanted him to take her away immediately, flinging aside THE RULES OF THE GAME. He wanted to do the 'honorable" thing by telling Robert her husband, but she just wanted him to throw everything to the wind for her. I can't blame either of them, One wants to break free but one can't really, ever. Christine feels very real to me because I've been there - the disappointment that your hero is not going to sweep you away, that he is all too human and weak. It all makes sense, every person's actions in the film makes sense, 'The awful thing about life is, everyone has their reasons.' Only too true, too true. And that goes for you and me, and everyone on this planet. We WANT and nothing is satisfying, not for very long anyway. *I also think our society has changed drastically since you last watched the film. When a smart phone is your master, it just tells you where we're headed. Most everyone now views themselves as the most important person.* I do see that around me, especially as a parent with kids in the school system. Every parent thinks their kid is special, and that's fine. But when they think their kid is above the rules, then it gets messed up. No one plays by the rules anymore, not even the written down rules. The rule of the game now is to be above the rules. The film has quite a few angles, without a doubt. Was there one person in the film who wasn't selfish? Actually, there were some. The cook who spoke up for Marceau (Julien Carette) did so unselfishly. And see, I don't even remember the cook! I thought that a few were a bit less selfish, but on deeper look were they? One could say Andre and Shumacher were less selfish, but then again you could look at them as unbending, which is actually more selfish. Christine seemed less selfish to me, but on closer look she was exactly like the others, trapped on a merry-go-round, wanting her cake and eating it too. If I had to sympathize with anyone, I think the ones I sympathized with most were Christine - her ennui and discovering the affair with Robert and Genevieve felt very real to me, she didn't really mean for things to get out of hand until after she saw Robert kissing Genevieve. Also her discomfort with Andre's insistence on telling Robert before they left would have ticked me off too. But I also think she let men love her too much, because she was insecure about her status as a foreigner. Guilty of selfishness! Marceau - at least he was open about his selfishness. Jackie - she was pretty above boards Octave - is the conscience of the thing. He can see what's going on, really going on, but he is powerless to stop it, divert it, or do anything at all. He tries to get people together, but is it unselfish? It's all in the service of his friends, but perhaps it's so he can remain the treasured houseguest. He is selfish enough to flee with Christine, but he sees the wrongness of it, just as Marceau sees his own selfishness. When he tries to fix it, it still ends up a selfish act that gives him pain for a lifetime afterwards, because it makes him look a coward. Octave is a true artist (one who sees), but without an art. I feel for him very much as I find myself in this position often. Robert - I can sympathize with his wish to disappear into a world of make believe, of his own making. He is happier with his music boxes than with any human being. As a classic film buff, I can relate. Octave was somewhat unselfish at the end (or was he just having second thoughts about how poor he would appear to Christine after they lived together for a while?), but look what it got him? A guilty conscience for the rest of his life. I was thinking as I was reading this thread this morning that there are some huge correlations for me between *Rules of the Game* and *Scarlet Street*. Chris didn't play by the rules of the game.... he actually fell for Kitty - they made fun of him for falling so hard. And he ended up in a murder, walking away with a guilty conscience for the rest of his life. This is not to denounce Scarlet Street in any way at all. On the contrary, it's a great, great film that takes a step forward from Rules of the Game and takes it one step further by zeroing in on one story. Maybe there are correlations between *The Rules of the Game* and every other movie made. I don't know, I haven't really thought it out. But I suspect that it's going to be another *Liberty Valance* or *The Searchers* for me... a benchmark movie that I measure most other films by, one that I see in most other films. I think The Rules of the Game is one of those rare films that is about everything.
  21. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Perhaps he's the sane one, the one WITH morals, which is why he needs to be punished, in his own head. *Great point! So what would you tell Chris if he came to you saying, "I hate my life"? What is he to do?* There is nothing I could say to him that would make any difference. he would feel it no matter what, even though to some extent we the audience don't think he's guilty. Now isn't that something? We sympathize with the murderer. Should he get off scott free for the killing? Perhaps not, but I feel that he paid. It's a weird position Lang puts us in. I guess if I had to say anything to him, I'd say "Paint it. Paint your horror."
  22. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    laffite, I did try the copy thing, but it was too late, my entire post was completely gone in a matter of seconds. My own fault for not copying it first, or being smart and composing in Word. This type of failure has only happened to me a couple of times, though I know others who have it as standard operating procedures!
  23. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    I'm keeping my fingers crossed that your computer comes back to life, Laffite! It's been so great talking to you here... very revitalizing. We don't want to lose you again!
  24. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Thanks! I wanted to go see *Being John Malkovich.* I think about it once in a while because all my really bright friends told me it was great. I'll have to see if it's on any of my sites. Sounds so crazy that it makes sense. I re-watched *RULES OF THE GAME* yesterday as I was starting to feel better from a bout of flu and I had a hankering to watch more French films, mainly Renoir for whom I seem to have an affinity lately. On second watch, it really hit me strongly. Last time through, about 15 years ago, I didn't get the depth of the film at all. Perhaps I can fault the terrible print, the smaller TV I watched it on, and the long deep shots where I couldn't see which characters were which. I can also fault my complete lack of life experience and perhaps an inattention to what was really going on. I didn't really understand the characters working as an ensemble - I wanted star turns and stand out characters I could identify with. My reaction was 'cute, but best film ever made?' This time through, after getting used to the film techniques (deep focus takes one whole watch through I think before you get the idea of what is happening), ensemble playing and the lack of a single fully good person to root for, I found ROTG to be a charming comedy/drama, but so much more. Many think it's about the decadence and crumbling of the class system in France or perhaps Europe before the second world war. It struck me so hard that I think it's about the decadence and crumbling of everything. The Fall of Civilization. A corrupt world that keeps on keeping on, sweeping the dust of it's human debris under the rug. It seemed SOOOO fresh and modern, a perfect example of today's TV and electronics age told 80 years ago before they were even a twinking in someone's brain. One could substitute today's obsession with the unreal worlds of electronics for Dalio's obsession with music boxes; and the lack of feeling for human life is, if anything, even more apparent today with our twenty-four-seven monitoring of so-called news. Basically, the things that make the movie great are still around. The moral lack which drives people to value the foolish and fickle above the deep and sombre (sometimes rightly), the class restrictions are coming back, the phoniness and ennui of life are still with us. We dream of a different life, but can't really escape our ingrained habits and selfishness. People are still killing themselves over those who aren't worthy, people are still jaded and shunned by society, people still talk behind other's backs, and people are still strange and crazy enough to kill for nothing at all. Plus ca change..... And I guess I've seen more of the world now, so I've changed... and the movie, if anything, has become more meaningful. I hope the next time I watch, I will have changed some more, and I'll find even richer troves to mine in this film. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 27, 2014 3:59 PM
  25. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I know I know! I was cutting and pasting just last week.... but then I saw these posts and I just had to reply quickly, I thought. An hour later and I was still working on it, then hit the button and it took too long to load and I knew it was kaput. I re-wrote it, to the best of my ability. Oh well, it probably could have used revision anyway. I think I might sit down with *True Romance* again soon too. See what it was I liked so much about it. Frank, I watched *The Golden Coach* this morning. I didn't like it nearly as much as *French Cancan*, but I really liked Magnani. The viscount or whatever he was also caught my attention, I liked their relationship. And the last part, the part when the narration, or perhaps it was the theater manager told her she should never go back to the real world because the theater was where she belonged, and the real world was one of heartbreak and failure, well it really hit me hard. The framework of this film made me think it was all her dream - how it pulled back out of the 'real' story to an unreal proscenium arch of a stage, as if what had happened to her was a vision of complete unreality - was this story what was in her mind? or was it all an act? What was real and what was the play? That was worth the whole movie. Not great, but the ending was super. I also watched Rules of the Game again after about 15 years. I didn't get it at all the last time I saw it, but it might have been because it is done in a lot of long shots, and I saw a very bad print of it on a small TV, so I just simply didn't get what was going on. I'll talk about that over in Rambles, because I don't want to glut the thread with my posts and more and more movies to talk about. Just to say that I really got it this time. really appreciated the scope of the film. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 27, 2014 3:20 PM

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