JackFavell

Members
  • Content Count

    14,349
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

Everything posted by JackFavell

  1. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Enjoying this discussion immensely! I just had to jump in and give my two cents on Chris Cross. I've seen the movie once, so bear with me.... I think Chris is just USED up. He's been driven mad, yes, but I feel he's more guilt ridden, which somehow for me seems different than insane, I don't know why. Insane means there is no reason for your actions, mental illness with no clear cause. We know the reason. No one else does, so the stranger on the street might say "insane", but we know better. Perhaps he's the sane one, the one WITH morals, which is why he needs to be punished, in his own head. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 27, 2014 9:30 AM
  2. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I want to kill myself. I just tried to post a reply I'd worked on for about an hour. TCM website deleted it. Aggggh! Including a list I made, just for you guys! ARGGGGGHHHH! CineMaven - You brought back *True Romance* for me so clearly, mostly with that quote. The movie seemed far blacker to me than that trailer made it seem, but it's been a very long time since I saw it. I came out of the film feeling like I'd really been through something with the main characters, and with a girl crush on Patricia Arquette. I just wish she'd gotten some more roles like this one. She had such a naive, unaffected style, sweet almost, even when you knew she had been around. I thought she was a terrific actress, it made me wonder why her sister got all the parts. I had forgotten how many great supporting roles there were in *True Romance!* No wonder I liked it - remember Brad Pitt's stoner, just didn't remember what movie it was from. And I thought Christopher Walken was scary till I saw Gary Oldman. Really liked the funny/scary vibe of this movie. It was exciting and I guess we can pretty much chalk that up to Tarantino's script. Laffite - I saw *Jackie Brown* when it came out, one of the three people in the theatre in my area. I liked it very much, but can't recall details. Heck, I'm terrible at the details even in classic films, unless I've seen them 100 times. I'll try to answer your question, but I doubt I'll be able to, since I have a bad memory. I'm very curious as to what that question is! As for Joan movies here is my ranking: *The Last of Mrs. Cheyney* *A Woman's Face* *Our Dancing Daughters* *Paid* *Rain* *Grand Hotel* *Our Modern Maidens* *The Women* *Mildred Pierce* *Johnny Guitar* *When Ladies Meet* *Possessed (1931)* *Berserk!* *Daisy Kenyon* *The Bride Wore Red* *Strange Cargo* *Humoresque* *Flamingo Road* *The Shining Hour* *Susan and God* - agree completely that only a star like Crawford can do what she does at the beginning of this movie - one of the best entrances ever *Best of Everything* *It's a Great Feeling* - Joan has a cameo that I laugh at every time *Laughing Sinners* - backstage story that works surprisingly well considering. *Above Suspicion* *Harriet Craig* *Reunion in France* *Across to Singapore* *Autumn Leaves* *Montana Moon* *Torch Song* *Dancing Lady* *Goodbye My Fancy* I remember liking *Love on the Run* and *Forsaking All Others* very much when I was a kid. I've seen the first half of *Sadie McKee,* and really enjoyed the pre-code-ness of it, but I missed the last half. Surprisingly, I like Joan right through to *Autumn Leaves.* The bottom four are pretty bad, but Joan still does her job, so you've got to give her credit. Sometimes her films don't quite work - her *Harriet Craig* is good, just not as good as the original *Craig's Wife* with Roz Russell. Joan fits the part like a glove, but the script and directing don't have the power of the film it was based on. Not Joan's fault. All in all, she serves her audiences well. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 27, 2014 9:18 AM Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 27, 2014 9:21 AM
  3. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    A few things from other posts: Laffite, *No Way Out* is really good, Widmark to my way of thinking is actually more awful as a human being here than in his smaller role in *Kiss of Death*. I actually like Widmark best in *Pickup on South Street* and then his REALLY weird character in *Saint Joan*, with Jean Seberg. That one gives him a chance to ACT. Frank, *A Woman's Face*.... you are right, I really REALLY like this one, can't wait to hear what you think of it. Both of you: *The Racket* is actually a remake of a 1928 film that you both should see sometime, starring Thomas Meighan as the cop trying to be straight against a corrupt system and Louis Wolheim as the racketeer with a soft spot for his brother. I only just watched the Robert Ryan version, and was shocked to find that it was the same exact story, told pretty much straight, like it's predecessor. The 1928 version is the grandaddy of all gangster films and is a little snappier. Marie Prevost, my very favorite silent actress plays the floozy and she's terrific. I think she was the GG of silent films. *Reservoir Dogs* horrified me when it came out. I can't hear the song Stuck in the Middle with You without thinking of it. That being said, the acting was fantastic and I liked how everything played out. I still love Tim Roth because of this film. *Kill Bill 1* I thought was absolute tripe until I saw *Kill Bill 2* which redeemed the first film for me. I like the idea of a spaghetti western or samourai film for women, even if the execution (pardon the pun) is quite long and drawn out. Frank you should see *Pulp Fiction*. It's got a great framework I think you'd like very much, it's Tarantino's most ambitious film all in all. Not my favorite, but it ages well, and the way it's told is very entertaining. True Romance is my favorite of the bunch, maybe because Tarantino only did the script and it was directed by someone else. Patricia Arquette is just fabulous in it, and it is exactly what the title says, only with some absolutely terrific GRIT thrown in. Gary Oldman is incredibly scary in this one. More later. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 25, 2014 11:50 AM
  4. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Someone else recommended Les Visiteurs to me somewhere along the way... so that is definitely one I'll look at. And I hate to tell you, I've had Le Notti Bianche sitting her for months and I've never watched it. I don't know whether I am lazy or stubborn or forgetful.
  5. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I went back and edited my last post because there was so much I wanted to get in but it all flooded out of me at first. My favorite movie musical is Singing in the Rain, which has the same kind of humor that French Cancan had and is also about a real place and time, and also makes fun of actors. I'd really love to know how Renoir got such a giddy, in your face excitement to that ending dance. It's marvelous, you can't help smiling and laughing at the girls and the audience.m I think I laughed out loud when they started popping up out of the audience or down from the rafters onto tables. Each section of the dance is more thrilling than the last. I really liked the baker girl as well, if she hadn't been as charming and unpretentious the story would have been awful. Plus she did her own dancing I believe. You could see how she charmed so many, and yet she didn't get a big head or anything. I loved the twist ending - Gabin was a big surprise to me in all ways in this movie. I never suspected him of doing what he did, because we saw it only from the baker girl's point of view. A movie with surprises! What will they think of next? I have The Golden Coach queued up next. I got a deal on free Hulu Plus for a month so I have to start watching all those Criterion films. I want to get as many watched as possible. I literally can't wait for your take on Fanny. Of the three films, Marius is my favorite, I'm not sure why, except that it's the set-up for the other two stories and gives you the feel of the area and characters best. Plus I am amazed at how advanced this movie is for it's time, 1931.
  6. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I'm dying to see *The Eldritch Never Sleep!* I picture it as a Rene Clair movie... maybe a sequel to I Married a Witch. Frank, I finally saw *French Cancan* (Renoir, 1954). What an absolutely great movie! This is now my second favorite musical of all time after Singing in the Rain. I found it funny, sad, beautiful, dramatic, colorful, worldly and tremendously exciting. The french settings were superb, the cast a dream. The story is a mere trifle, but the execution of it was just plain masterful, full of charming stars outdoing themselves and each other to present a postcard of Paris at the Belle Epoque. Was this a MissG suggestion? Or did you find it on your own? It's great. I had no idea it was about the beginnings of the Moulin Rouge, not until they finally said the name of the brand new showplace about a third of the way through the film. It made me gasp when I realized that they were building us up to the opening of this real place, that the film was a valentine to Renoir's father's period. The setting and characters were wonderful, just my kind of movie, lots of backstories and character actors. For once, the musical number at the end lived up to its build up, it even surpassed my expectations - it was filmed with such gusto I don't know how anyone could watch and not feel good - it was like being at a big, glorious, FUN party with the most amazing dancing ever, the dancers flinging themselves around in perfectly planned wild and colorful abandon. It made me wish I was still in theatre, the people of it are so grand, and I think this is what Renoir was truly getting at - don't try to label or turn a theatre person into anything else. it's truly in their blood and they can never settle down to a regular life once bitten by the arts. Renoir speaks to us of the concerns of the artist, something he knew well, and his father passed on to him. Is it possible that Gabin could play ANY role? I especially loved the sincere but fickle Gabin and his vixen, the raven haired Maria Felix. I've heard about her for years but never saw her in anything. The country laundress who becomes a stage star and Gabin's next lover was attractive, acted and danced beautifully. One could see the raw clay which Gabin saw within her, his Galatea. The twist with Gabin at the end was perfect, ironic. Such a simple backstage story, but told well, and with more fascinating themes of patronage and humanity. Gabin simply being himself, explaining that he is only human and therefore never going to settle down really lent the film a terrific denoument. I loved his irritated speech about how art is his lover and he cannot be anything but what he is. I liked that he was what he was, and there was no judgement of him in the end. Wonderful. A terribly exciting film. It's joie de vivre is catching. Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 24, 2014 10:31 AM Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 24, 2014 11:09 AM
  7. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    *the Basehart film is Tension.* I had to look it up finally. I had decided that it was called 'The E______ on North Street", because of Frank's hint which I thought was the initials of something. I think it's time I checked into that Rest Home that the boys talked about so long ago... my brain is not functioning at very high levels lately. Laffite - check ebay, they have copies of the trilogy there for less that $197.00! I saw one in the bidding stages for significantly less, and another which is marked BUY IT NOW (no bidding) for about a fourth of that price. I got mine just in time I guess, because I waited for it to be on sale and got it for around 30 bucks. It was money well spent, though I usually set limits at no higher than 20 for anything, usually more like 5. I just found a copy of Jean de Florette AND Manon of the Spring for $4.74 at Barnes and Noble. I snapped it right up, with shipping it cost $ 7.72. That's more like it! Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 22, 2014 11:46 AM
  8. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Oh yes, I forgot to reply to you Sansfin, I've seen that movie where Basehart plays a milquetoast chemist. I love that movie, one of his best. I couldn't remember the title either even after the enormous hint Frank gave. I am a fan of Basehart generally and I think he pulls off the slow burn of that character so well. I also like him in La Strada very much, though he is dubbed. Others I have seen where he is good are Time Limit- a military drama, Fourteen Hours, House on Telegraph Hill, and The Good Die Young, which we talked about just a little while ago. But your description of him in Voyage was just so perfect, it made me giggle.
  9. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    M. Pirate, it takes a strong man to admit that he weeps. MissG, I was just thinking I'd like to revisit those later films after reading Laffite's excellent post on Pagnol and his warmth. I don't think I've seen them since I worked in a video store back in the 90's. I too was wondering if there was a Criterion collection of them. There certainly should be, it would be wonderful to have them all in a set. Manon was the first one I saw, followed by Jean de Florette and then the others. I know, I know, I was out of order! But it didn't matter, I was completely won by the movies. I hadn't any hope of getting copies of Fanny, Marius and Cesar, which I longed to see from my reading of classic film books when I was young. I was only able to get copies of those a few years ago after renting them when the dvd was released. I bought the set instead of copying them from TCM, which shows how much I love them and how influential they have been on my life. MissG, I think you would get so much out of these early films, there is a great beauty in them, though they aren't perhaps as pretty as the later film. *not sophistication in the uppity aristocratic sense, rather just an earthy recognition of knowing what?s morally correct in that most difficult of situations, despite the bitter disappointment it causes someone so close to him, his very son.. He is quite firm with his son but his love never wavers, as your screen cap indicates in your post.* I like your description as 'earthy recognition of what's morally correct'. Cesar is a thoughtful man at heart, which is why I love him. He really takes things into account, what is best for the (*spoiler word here* ), for the future. And this thoughtfulness is sadly what brings about this: *And just a word about Cesar, the third movie in the trilogy, no real spoiler here, but just to mention that we see several examples of the idea of mensonge (deceit), it?s quite striking how this idea is punched so often and early, and yet we can see that these are not bad people.* And yet, it can be said that those decisions made were the best that could have been made at the time with the information at hand. I tend to think that had Marius stayed, it would have worked out as the grandparents thought it might, with more general unhappiness the outcome. But of course it could also be said that no one trusted Marius to make his own decisions. Poor Marius! He's really the difficult character... when I think maybe he's a little whiny about things, I try to put myself in his shoes. He should have had all the information given to him at some point. And that's all I'll say till later! I do love the rondelay of emotions, how we can take sides with one person, then shift our thoughts to agree with someone else's perspective as the entire story plays out. Because there really is no right or wrong here, everyone is right, and everyone is wrong. The French do these sort of moral or possibly amoral tales so well don't they? Never really judging.
  10. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    This thread has been such an interesting read! I'm loving all the comments and the movies and the conversation. Frank, I am SO excited that *Steamboat Bill Jr.* topped your list! Fantastic! This was my first Keaton film too, back when I was a kid. My sister had a gotten a film projector for her birthday and a few 8 or 16 mm films to watch on it. This was the one that really stands out in my memory, though for some years it had moved down my list of Keaton's films just because it was old hat, hahaha! Keaton just stuffs this film full of gags, right from the start - the hat scene is hilarious, the scene with the peanut shells on the floor of his bedroom, the scene in the jail when he tries to smuggle his dad a file in that loaf of bread, the start of the storm,.... it all works so perfectly and it's FUNNY. No one could do pratfalls like Keaton, his falls defy gravity and they sometimes are so complex that they have different sections to them! No one had timing like Keaton. What also makes Keaton so interesting for me is his attention to gadgetry and physics - I LOVE LOVE LOVE how he rigs the boat, the Stonewall Jackson is it called? in order to drive it by levers and ropes, and still be on the lower deck at the same time to rescue everyone. You probably already know that he risked death to do that stunt where the front of the house falls on him... they had to weight the front of the house so it would fall correctly, he's running into that shot and had to hit his mark perfectly in order to clear the window...legend has it that the cameraman turned his head away while shooting for fear that Buster would be smashed to bits. The movie that thrills me the most to see high on your list is *Marius.* I'm so glad that there is another fan of Pagnol here - Laffite, we are totally on the same page with all the Pagnol films and I've been dying to talk to someone about these particular three. It's something about the tone of all the Pagnol films that is so special, so understanding of human nature and foibles. Pagnol is so gentle with his characters, just when you expect someone to throw a fit or even beat someone up, they react with love and understanding. They are unique and make me feel it's good to be alive. Frank, the great pleasure for me in *Marius* is first and foremost Raimu. He's such a brilliant actor, I always think of him with great feeling. he is emotional and paternal in the best way. What a character! But after that, I just love the way that blood really is thicker than water, and how the seaside merchants come together ... the movie speaks of community and family in a way that isn't preachy or sentimental, but leaves you feeling warm. Fanny's mom was a real surprise to me. When they had all discussed the aunt who had 'gone bad' so much I really expected Honorine (I think that's her name) to throw Fanny out of the house or beat her. It was the greatest of pleasures to see the scene where she went to Cesar and after some initial bickering together they planned the way everything would work out, coming to terms with real life. Panisse also surprised me. For laboring folks, they are surprisingly frank and open-minded people, even sophisticated in their way - they remind me of my mother's family, who came from farmers but somehow seem to take everything in their stride, accepting things you'd never expect them to accept... I'd like to live in one of these films and meet the people. No one is right, and no one is wrong here, which is why I was pretty sure you'd like them. And speaking of un-sentimentally handled sweet films, I was actually worried about *Miracle on 34th Street* and your reaction to it. But then I watched it again at the holidays and saw once more how it combines the sweet with the salty - the satire still works! So much of what makes the movie charming is how Gwenn reacts to such things as capitalism, psychiatry, and how those around him react with amazement back. It can't be goodness that drives him to send Thelma Ritter to other stores, in her mind and all the other denizens of the city, it's a store marketing policy. And what is great about the whole thing is how catching being nice is. It's just a great movie, and of course it has a whole batch of my favorite character actors - Thelma, Gene Lockhart, Jerome Cowan (I love his scene in court with his kid), William Frawley, Porter Hall (the eyebrow puller). And the psychology is spot on with him, isn't it? Let me say that Natalie Wood is exceptional in the film, I love her quizzical looks and her scene where she's mumbling to herself, " I believe, it's silly but I believe..." She and Gwenn just make this film what it is. Gwenn IS Kris Kringle, and they ground the movie. I love kids who are like little adults in movies. But it doesn't hurt to have such really fine actors as Maureen and John Payne as the romantic leads. Maureen brings gravitas and a little sadness to the proceedings, and Payne brings light-heartedness and sexiness to his role that might have been totally useless. I never thought of how close this one is to *Holiday Affair*, but they are like reverses of each other - they complement one another very well and I hope people won't shun one for the other. I liked your comparison to *Harvey* ... I never thought about that but it's very true. The two films treat modern society with a wink, and a sure knowledge that it really is better to be 'oh so pleasant'. For years I remembered *Island of Lost Souls*, and thought it was *The Most Dangerous Game*... then was so disapppointed when I would see it and it would be the wrong movie. Lost Souls is sooooooo creepy. Laughton is so good, and somehow I knew you would like the Panther woman! *White Zombie*, which Miss G mentioned is a terrific next choice, and so is *Kongo*, with Walter Huston which is very, very similar to Lost Souls but not as good. It starts out pretty ripe, but wins you in the end. I am a big fan of *The Jungle Book,* but it took me a while to see it's charm. I like the story, even if it's a bit preachy, because it kind of fits the fable style of the movie. I especially like the flashback framework of the film being narrated by the old beggar - who ends up playing an important role in the flashback part of the film. I still can't get over the wild animals in this movie! Sabu is one of my favorite actors actually, I've seen him since I was a kid, and he is very natural and instinctive, quite funny in both this one and *The Thief of Bagdad.* I have nothing but good feelings about him all wrapped around my childhood. He's a perfect representative of innocence, which can be cruel but can also be exhilarating and free. *Young Cassidy* surprised me by being energetic and feeling, a young man's film. I very very much like it as well, but can't add too much to what's already been said. It's cast beautifully...Rod Taylor and his ladies are perfect. I am very surprised that *The Secret Life of Walter Mitty* came in so high! I like the film very much, all the little bits make up a very good whole.... it's a little long, but other than that I really enjoy it. This one, and *The Kid from Brooklyn* made me love Danny Kaye and Virginia Mayo when I was young. On last watch, what I really liked was the send up of pulpy comics, and Kaye's relationship with his boss, Thurston Hall who is not above stealing his ideas while berating him for being late. Also, when Boris Karloff shows up parodying himself, it's hard not to like a movie. I'll finish up this mega treatise on two more..... *Dead Reckoning* - it's my favorite Lizabeth Scott film. She looks like a million bucks here and plays a part that fits her well which I'm not sure she ever really got much. I also like the framework of the army buddy story. It ticked me off at the end when they kind of rehashed some of Bogies other films, but all it all it's a solid film. *The Desperate Hours* - I feel exactly like Miss G on this one. It's OK, but the kid and the mom really bug the heck out of me. I prefer *Suddenly* or the really creepy......oh man, I have to look up the title........ah, here it is... *Cry Terror* with Inger Stevens and James Mason. Desperate Hours is OK, but nothing great to my way of thinking. I love the idea of switching up the roles! What I'd really like to have seen was Bogie as the dad, and Spence as the hood! Now that would have been a novelty, and would have given both a chance to do something outside their normal casting! I fell asleep during *Christmas Holiday* jjust a month ago. Sansfin - your description of Basehart in *Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea* made me laugh in spite of liking him. It's true! He can be good, but he can also tend toward that Shatner school of acting style that is unintentionally funny, I hate to admit. I much prefer George Sanders and Joseph Cotten in *From the Earth to the Moon* for this type of fare. It's not good either but it doesn't take itself too seriously. Frank, thanks most of all for including links to the films you watched, I am really curious about the Mickey Rooney one and some of the others, like the Warner Baxter Chan entry, just because this was only a couple years after he was The Great Gatsby, which is lost, and I'd like to see him in this kind of romantic role. I am interested in seeing some of the others you mention as well, and maybe I can get to them someday..... sigh Edited by: JackFavell on Jan 20, 2014 5:20 PM
  11. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    I will try EXTRA hard to either stay up for Possessed, or get a recording, M. Pirate. Jane Randolph was Kent Smith's gal Friday in Cat People and his wife and Ann Carter's mom in Curse of the Cat People. A good sensible actress that I would like a lot if she hadn't stolen Irena's man!
  12. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Bonjour mon capitaine! Laffite, it is so GOOD to hear from you. I thought perhaps you were holed up somewhere in Manorca or Tenerife, fighting for your life or romancing the natives, you pirate you! Thanks so much for thinking of us, and coming back to say hi. I hope you can visit more often, now you have TCM again. Maybe finally I will get to see the 1947 version now that Joanie is SOTM. After reading your words, I really must. You are one of the people I trust most about movies, along with the Rambles gang, so when you say a movie is worth watching, I listen. Take care, Happy New Year, and don't be a stranger!
  13. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Happy New Year! Looking forward to Joanie, though I've been re-watching her for the last month or so already. Gotta admire her drive and her ability to always get the job done well. I'll definitely enjoy the month, Joan rocks! I'm most looking forward to the silents and pre-codes, Love Our Dancing Daughters and Our Modern Maidens. Haven't seen the third in the trilogy. Also really enjoy PAID. But my favorite Joan film by far is The Last of Mrs. Cheyney. Perfect, perfect role for Joan - not high class, not low class. I also like Berserk, not bad at all despite the sensational title.
  14. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    This is just so devastating, even though each of these actors who passed in the last week or so reached old age. We hate to see you go.... our dreams live in your films. Vitality may go, but in film, your moment is eternal. Rest in peace, our dear beloved stars. You've each given more joy than you could ever have imagined.
  15. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    OMG! You have my mind reeling adding Dixon Steele to the mix!!! you make my eyes bug out thinking of all the wonderful possibilities... More later.
  16. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    I'm not sure which *Buster Keaton* collection you bought, the Ultimate one? I think if I were you, I'd start with either *College,* or *Steamboat Bill, Jr.* Of the short films, I'd go with *One Week,* and then maybe *Cops.* *Laurel and Hardy,* I think you could dive in anywhere and get just as much enjoyment from whatever you watched. Save *The Music Box* for a little later, it's so good it should be built up to. My goodness, I don't know how you get to all these movies! Geez, I think I've watched 3 movies in the time it took you to watch 30! I haven't seen a lot of these. Here's my guesses for how you ranked your top picks: 1. *Tarzan The Ape Man* - sublime, naughty, and just great fun 2. *The Fallen Idol* - One of my all time favorite movies, suspenseful with lots of emotion and a wicked sense of humor as well 3. *I Married a Witch* - It's actually one of my least favorite Rene Clairs, but that doesn't mean I don't like it. I just love Veronica and her evil dad Cecil Kellaway. March is good, kind of stuffy and in need of a makeover, which Lake makes happen. Screwball magic Clair should = perfect. The problem I have with it is it seems kind of mean spirited at times, maybe because March and Lake hated each other's guts. Also badly needs restoration which makes it hard to watch. I think you'll like it's naughtiness. 4. *Thunderball* 5. *Lady Killer* - I remember liking this quite a lot, with poor Mae Clarke getting dragged across the floor this time, no grapefruit in the mug. I think it combines gangster with comedy pretty successfully. Wish I remembered the story better. 6. *Union Station* -I can't remember this one too well, but Nancy Olsen and Holden are always good together. I think this one is a pretty entertaining police procedural, pretty gripping in the end. 7. *She* - great special effects, a melancholy streak that I like, but not quite as suspenseful as I wanted it to be. Love Helen Gahagan. 8. *Red Light* - I remember this one being quite good... again, if you like Raft, you'll like this one. 9. *Congo Maisie* (I haven't seen this one in a while, I need a refresher) 10. *Fingers at the Window* (I just loved this one! Saw it recently and enjoyed every minute, very light, very suspenseful, wish it were a series) 11. *Bridge to the Sun* - I think you will like this one for the romance and the problems the couple faces, the two cultures clashing. Maybe you might have ranked it higher than this. I like it very much. 12. *Other Men's Women* - another one I came in on by accident and got caught up in. Wellman. Sheesh! Love that guy!) 13. *Fly Away Baby* - I think Steve loosens up quite a bit by the time we get here, and Torchy is on the ball! I suspect the Torchy films will only grab you a little, because they are very formula and I'm not sure you like the premise much. 14. *Underwater!* - I adore this movie, it's a great guilty pleasure of mine. I honestly don't care if it's cheesy, I love the banter between the three leads, and the scenes with my Joe Calleia. Everyone looks like they are having a blast. Silly, but fun. 15. *Man of the Moment* again, I enjoyed this one very much, you, I think, might hate it. I thought Laura La Plante was wonderful, I've only seen her in silents before. It's a bit creaky in the plot, but I very much like her perky performance. She's one of those actresses who make you want to look at her. She quit soon after this and it's kind of a shame. Marion Davies played a lot of roles like this one, but I think Laura does it better. 16. *Small Town Girl* - I like this one very much, I think Gaynor makes the sweetness work and she and Taylor have good chemistry. I just think it won't be your cup of tea. 17. *Biography of a Bachelor Girl* - I suspect you hate this one almost as much as Double Harness. I like the combination of smarts and sex in Harding's character.... she's more charming here than in any other movie I've seen her in and I like the naughtiness tremendously. Critics hated her because they'd seen the play done the year before with Ina Claire, who was one of the most charming and light actresses of that time. Harding couldn't have looked heavier and more clunky compared with her, but I still like her. I've seen *Maid of Salem* but it was years and years ago. I don't see you and suffering Claudette being a good match. I'm curious about the Diana Lynn movie, I like her.
  17. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Oh NO! Not those two together! Glad you got my facetiousness about the starting point of this film, the way it's set up with that perfect woman/perfect marriage scenario. I love that the writers started with something we pretty much all want - the ideal marriage or relationship....then they backtrack and turn it all completely upside down, into a nightmare. I think the best noirs start at the same place - a situation we all can identify with - the half dreamed idea we form in our inner coinsciousness to solve all our troubles - the perfect crime, the perfect marriage, the perfect fling without getting caught, or even like Craig's Wife - the perfect home, a woman's houseproud manic attempt at cleanliness... those ideals of perfection, they can lead you into a lot of trouble. DANGER...DANGER signal ahead.... These movies are basically telling you, life is full of imperfection. Settle for that giant family showing up at your doorstep suddenly or unexpectedly. Settle for a stained rug and the chair with the wobble in it. The alternative is madness, because that kind of perfection either cannot be attained, or comes with a heavy price. I don't know about you, but I somehow don't think that being a model would be enough for Ellen. I see her as a Wall St. shark, a business exec with a taste for the jugular. But man, would she look good while she was icing some rival advertising exec.... BRILLIANT!! That's a great observation. I love the sick twistedness of her truth...her confession. I see the scene so clearly ( with my own dialogue, of course. ;-) ) Richard begins to question her as the veil slowly falls from his eyes. She begins to cop to everything. It's freeing in its crazy gloriousness. It's sort of like she's saying: "Yes I let your brother die and I killed our unborn child because I didn't want to share you with ANYbody. In-laws? Ha! I don't even want my OWN family around. Just like Ida Lupino said: 'I committed murder to get you!' See how much I love you Richard. Hey, where're you going? Sheesh! We can watch 'They Drive By Night' together..." Doesn't sound so good when you think it through, Ellen. Like a dog bringing you a dead possum. ( "Here Mom...I done good?" ) I just laughed at your whole ramble, but mostly at the above part. It's true, it IS gloriously freeing and she starts to spill more and more... And still that cold stare from Cornel. See? I'm still sympathizing with Ellen, and she's a murderess, two times over! That's the perverse part of the movie...YES, it does make sense in some alternate universe, everything she does makes a twisted sense. Does this all go back to M, with Peter Lorre, the sympathy for the villain? Because I admit it, I still love the woman who killed. Many see her as inhuman, but I see her as all too human. I also liked what you said about carrying the story to the nth degree, her just sitting staring at Richard, a la Stephen King's Misery. The clock on the wall ticking.... staring in silence. I see it! I wonder who would win out between Smith Ohlrig and Ellen... I think we might have a draw, a duel in the sun, a mexican standoff with the two of them going over a cliff together, or blowing themselves sky high.... "Top of the world, Ma!"
  18. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    Don't be jealous! Join in! We can chat here more you know! For instance, when Maven talked about plaid, I wished I'd mentioned how brilliant it was for TCM to show *Leave Her to Heaven* and *Written on the Wind* back to back - the movies have more in common than I ever would have thought, including plaid: Or when Maven asked about how women and men might see the film differently, I wish I'd said that Ellen is a man's perfect fantasy, much like Glenn Close would be years later in Fatal Attraction. She's perfect - she doesn't want kids, she doesn't want family. She only wants her husband. Any man would be salivating at the idea of a gorgeous woman with no strings attached. A dream come true, right? But the filmmakers flip that on it's ear, make it blacker than black in theme. So the movie appeals to women and men on some really weird levels. For women, it's a portrayal of getting revenge for those little complaints and irritations that go along with home-making and being married. I've felt like getting rid of my husband's family on occasion, leaving us in peace. Or trying to get rid of the distractions that seem to make us distant from one another. For men, it's a fantasy of the perfect woman, someone who wants exactly what they want, someone who's SO INTO YOU they just won't let anything get in the way. Heck, she KILLED to be alone with you. Isn't that the ultimate act of love? It's kind of sexy. Also in reading back over our conversation I realize that love made Ellen do something that she never did before - tell the truth. She admitted killing Danny, she admitted to all the horrible things she did. For love. The man had the upper hand for the first time in Ellen's life, she gave it to him on a silver platter, with love. And that's why she framed him, because she gave her power willingly, and he snubbed that gift. He had to go, she had to get revenge. I think this is something that subliminally, everyone who has ever been dumped in a relationship can understand. Edited by: JackFavell on Dec 12, 2013 8:08 AM
  19. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    That's terrible! How could they laugh at this movie? How upsetting. I would've been in a rage worthy of Ellen herself if I'd been there. We kidded around a lot, but never laughed AT the movie or the characters. That's sacrilege!
  20. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    That sounds so wonderful, MissG. I have a picture in my mind now of turkeys in dinner jackets and gowns, all lined up at a banquet table with humans serving them champagne and caviar...
  21. JackFavell

    RAMBLES Part II

    A rainy morning here, and a perfect lineup to watch in grey weather - First, *The Testament of Dr. Mabuse,* then *Blackmail* by Hitchcock, then Ford's *The Informer,* and *Dead of Night,* though I won't go into that one here. Wonderful, and they all seem connected somehow to me, not sure what the connection is, though I know Ford was influenced by UFA films and so was Hitch. I guess they all have to do with crime coming back to haunt you. I'd never seen *The Testament of Dr. Mabuse* (1933), but the opening scenes pulled me in immediately. What a great way to be introduced to this mastermind (I'm talking about Mabuse, not Lang )The movie bounces around in time, with flashbacks and flash forwards, but is clear as a bell, never gets confusing. Some of the best parts were just little things - a row of workers at desks a la *Metropolis* or *The Crowd,* a wonderful shot of a ghostly presence, appearing suddenly behind someone's back, then disappearing just as quickly. Unfortunately, I had to get my daughter off to school, get breakfast ready, and empty trash and take it outside for pickup at 7:30, so I missed the entire middle of the film. Luckily I recorded the movie and all the others showing this morning. I loved the police inspector, played by Otto Wernicke, through which Lang got in some of his funniest lines and moments. I do so love Lang's humor when it's present. Also thrilling was the performance of Karl Meister, I think it was, who played the insane Dwight Frye-alike, Hofmeister. Also Karetsky, played by Theo Lingen. You've just got to love those men who laugh... right into madness. *Blackmail* was great, though the pacing after Mabuse seemed almost sleepy. There was a slow part after the main action took place where I almost did fall asleep. Hitch had not tightened up his style yet, but it was plain this was his picture and it came round. Amy Ondra was a little silly at the beginning of the film, not quite as expressive as other Hitch heroines. It seemed hard work for her to find the more specific complex emotions we expect of Hitchcock's women. I wasn't sure I liked her, but over the course of the scant 90 minutes, she won me over with a very good performance... and she's quite amazing looking, very cute. Her voice reminded me of Glynis Johns. Charles Paton was excellent as her cop boyfriend Frank who was willing to do anything to keep her from confessing, and Donald Calthrop was appropriately seedy and then nervous as the blackmailer who picked the wrong couple to target. I found him quite sympathetic, trapped in the mess of his own making. Cyril Ritchard was by turns totally charming and creepy as the artist Ondra flirts with, ultimately facing off with when he assaults her. It was a great pleasure to see him so young, and on top of that, he actually got to play and sing a number at the piano which was thrilling. After that, the incomparable *Informer,* with Victor MacLaglen. I can't say enough about this great film. MacLaglen is beyond terrific. He's incredible, compelling, a giant of a man and an actor, and sympathetic at all times. Big, dumb and forgetful, the scene at the end where he pleads for someone to "tell me why I did it? Can somebody tell me why I did it?" just breaks me into little pieces, and then breaks those pieces into little pieces. I was a sobbing mess by the time it was over, and I've seen it about a hundred times, always with the same reaction. I defy someone to not shed a tear at the end of that film. Also terrific in a performance that grows on me more and more each time I see it, is Joe Sawyer, broken-nosed avenging angel who never lets up on MacLaglen's Gypo. He suspects right from the start that Gypo is the informer. And speaking of angels, Margot Grahame is Katie, the girl Gypo wants to take out of misery and poverty, the reason he betrayed his friend in the first place. An exceedingly realistic and yet appealingly dramatic performance from Grahame, make sure to pay attention to her tired voice and the look she gives the john who tries picking her up at the beginning of the film. She's great as a world weary, hungry girl on the edge of prostituting herself for food. Donald Meek gives an outstanding performance as Mulligan the tailor, an essentially comic role - his relating of his actions during the day of the betrayal lightens the mood considerably but without changing the solemnity or tone of the movie. I always crack up when he talks about the egg he had for lunch, as if that's the most important part that the IRA would want to know about. Every other actor in this film is excellent, and Ford's expressionist mise en scene make this one of my favorites, even a favorite among Ford's work which is saying a lot. Perfect for a rainy, foggy day.
  22. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    At least we know it's on ebay! Why on earth are you trying to go meatless? I did that once, and it gets a little better after about 2 weeks, when your body doesn't crave it any more.
  23. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Ha! Maybe that's why I haven't eaten any of the leftover turkey... I went looking for photos, but I only found one tiny one of Kurt breaking his cane in half which is pretty hilarious looking but had the word ENDED written across it, so it isn't worth posting here.
  24. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Mais oui! C'est fantastique!
  25. JackFavell

    The Annual FrankGrimes Torture Thread

    Oh lordy, That IS torture for Mr. Grimes! Of the best kind. Embarrassed that I recognize only about 5... time to brush up on my Italian cinema...

New Members:

Register Here

Learn more about the new message boards:

FAQ

Having problems?

Contact Us