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  1. Rediscover the Pre-CGI Screen Magic Of 1959's Classic "Journey to the Center of the Earth" Starring James Mason, Arlene Dahl & Pat Boone. Directed by Henry Levin. (1959 - 132mins. - Color - 20th Century Fox) A 50th Anniversary Screening Shown In 20th Century Fox's NEW Restoration Print Hosted by its star, Ms. Arlene Dahl -- In Person! At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre A Historic Movie Palace Now Open As A Non-Profit Multi-Discipline Arts Center 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Web: www.loewsjersey.org Email: loewsjersey@gmail.com Saturday, April 25 7:15PM Post-screening interview & audience Q&A from the stage is included with regular admission to the film. A pre-screening "Meet & Greet" reception with Ms. Dahl to benefit the Loew's from 5:45 to 7:00PM. A limited number of tickets are available for $20. Light refreshments will be served, and admission to the screening is included. Space is limited for the Reception. Reservations are suggested. Call (201) 798-6055. The Movie: A handsome professor-turned-explorer . . . Our hero running for his life in front of a huge, rolling bolder . . . A determined heroine . . . A treacherous villain plotting to steal the professor?s discovery. . . . Buried ruins and an ancient temple destroyed in a climactic earthquake. No ? we?re not talking about the Indiana Jones series. All of this and more is found in the visually spectacular ?Journey to the Center of the Earth? made in 1959, more than 20 years before Harrison Ford first donned that hat. See "Film Notes" below for more movie info. Don't miss this chance to see this classic sci-fi & fantasy film, a family favorite for years, on the 50 foot W-I-D-E screen at the Loew's Jersey, with the movie's legendary eye-popping colors and spectacular W-I-D-E screen special effects fully restored! Our Guest: After briefly working as a model, Arlene Dahl first acted on Broadway in 1945. The next year she was voted "Miss Rheingold of 1946", and began working at MGM the year after that. By 1948 Dahl was playing leads at MGM. In the tradition of such drop-dead-gorgeous redheads as Maureen O'Hara and Rhonda Fleming, Dahl often as not found herself cast in Technicolor swashbucklers, notably "Caribbean" (1952), "Sangaree" (1952) and "Bengal Brigade" (1953). In 1956 Dahl delivered an intimidatingly superb performance as a beautiful psycho in Allan Dwan's "Slightly Scarlet". Among some of her other best known films are "Reign of Terror", "Three Little Words", "A Woman's World" and of course "Journey to the Center of the Earth". She is the mother of actor Lorenzo Lamas, with her second husband Fernando Lamas. After the birth of her son, Ms. Dahl largely withdrew from acting, instead founding a business that marketed cosmetics and lingerie and becoming a columnist. In later years, she had a recurring role on TV's "One Life to Live". She has two other children in addition to Lorenzo. Admission: Tickets for the screening & interview are $7 for adults, $5 for seniors & children 12 years old and younger. Tickets for the pre-screening reception with Ms. Dahl, beginning at 5:45PM, are $20. Reservations are suggested. Reserved tickets will be held at the door. Light refreshments will be served. Admission to the screening is included. Proceeds benefit Friends of the Loew's, Inc. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, is minutes from the NJ Turnpike & easily reached by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Area. Half-price off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's. Patrons present a coupon to garage attendant when they leave. Coupon is available at our box office. What's Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew's? The Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre is one of America's grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting -- on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew's runs reel-to-reel, not platter, projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. The Loew's Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew's, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. For directions or more information: Call (201) 798-6055 or visit www.loewsjersey.org. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew's, Inc. FILM NOTES In this film based loosely on Jules Verne?s story, James Mason stars as an amusingly absent-minded professor who accidentally finds directions for a path into the Earth?s core that were left by a long-lost explorer. Mason picks up the quest, and is joined by one of his students, played by pop-singer Pat Boone (whose popularity at the time 20th Century Fox hoped ? correctly as it turned out ? would be a big box office draw). Arlene Dahl plays the strong-willed widow of a rival geologist who insists on joining the adventure, adding a heroine character that Verne never imagined. An Icelandic guide and his pet duck Gertrude (!) round out the exploration party. But they soon encounter the villainous descendant of the long-lost explorer as he plots to hijack the exploration for his own gain. Part science fiction, part adventure, part fantasy, Journey to the Center of the Earth is the kind of movie that, in order to succeed, must convince its audience to suspend disbelief and be drawn into a fantastic alternate world being created on screen. Today, of course, the default tool to accomplish this is CGI. But Journey to the Center of the Earth is an extraordinary showcase of how movie makers accomplished this long before the digital era. Several generation of movie goers remember being dazzled the first time they saw Journey?s winding tunnels, vast underground grottoes, luminous crystal canyon, forest of giant mushrooms, lost city and erupting volcano. None of this was summoned from a computer, but instead was produced through some of the most effective combinations ever seen of more venerable techniques: Location shots in Carlsbad Caverns were joined with footage using elaborate full size sets, detailed miniatures (models), and very successful matte painting ? painted back drops that fooled the camera by adding depth and perspective. (Matte painting is, in the era of CGI, an all but forgotten art.) One of the best remembered scenes in Journey has the explorers encountering ferocious subterranean dinosaurs ? created through the ?trick photography? of enlarging film of lizards with faux fins glued onto their backs! It may sound campy today, but the effect was more than respectable for its time. But the makers of Journey to the Center of the Earth did not rely solely on spectacular art direction. Carl Faulkner's sound engineering is also a substantial asset, even out-pacing some of the visual effects in impact. Bernard Hermann?s orchestral score, including cathedral-sized pipe organs, is an indispensable part of the film?s atmosphere, furthering the sense of wonder and adding to the feeling of progression: as the explorers travel deeper and deeper into the bowls of the earth, the register of the music grows lower and lower. Of course, the success of Journey to the Center of the Earth doesn?t rely solely on its special effects and score. The ensemble cast strikes the perfect balance between the script?s drama, fantasy and even comedic moments. James Mason and Arlen Dahl are terrific in their leading roles, and even Pat Boone ? not usually remembered for his acting ? turns in a likable supporting performance. A half century after it was made, this version of Journey to the Center of the Earth is remembered by many movie lovers as the definitive version, despite several TV and theatrical re-makes, including the most recent in 2008 that is laden with modern computer graphics -- quite a testament to the quality of the film?s production.
  2. Deadpan Crime *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened in 35mm on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, March 30 8PM *"The Big Lebowski"* *Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Julianne Moore, *Steve Buscemi. *D 1998, 127mins. Color. Rated R. The Coen Brothers (Joel directed and co-wrote the screenplay; Ethan co-wrote and produced) tend to put a distinct stamp on everything they do. Sometimes, the result is a movie that is embraced with cult-like devotion by some and loathed by others – with little room in between. So it is with this gleefully absurd film. The plot of this Raymond Chandler-esque comedy crime caper from the Coens pivots around a case of mistaken identity complicated by extortion, double-crosses, deception, embezzlement, sex, pot, and gallons of White Russians (made with fresh cream, please). Having said that, the film doesn't really have much use for established storytelling techniques: it's more of a series of bizarre vignettes, which might be a problem if they weren't so funny. The title character, brilliantly played by Jeff Bridges, is a latter-day, stoner version of Philip Marlowe; it's one of the many homages the Coens make to films of decades past. The supporting players -- including John Goodman as Lebowski's buddy, and John Turturro as the wonderfully profane bowling champ Jesus -- are excellent as well. The soundtrack includes Bob Dylan, Yma Sumac, Moondog, Captain Beefheart, and the Sons of the Pioneers. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, March 31 6PM * "Fargo" * *Frances McDormand, William H. Macy, Steve Buscemi, *Peter Stormare, Harve Presnell. *Directed by Joel Coen.* 1996, 97mins, Color. Rated R. Unlike the Coen Brother’s “The Big Lebowski”, “Fargo” unwinds more or less in traditional, linear storytelling. What is unusual about the film is how successfully it manages to be both an absurdist comedy AND an edgy, stylized crime drama at the same time. While the movie never shies away from the grim facts or graphic consequences of the kidnapping and multiple murders at the core of the narrative, “Fargo” does manage to skate playfully into a dryly comic (but also, oddly affectionate) look at life in the frozen wastes of Minnesota, where Joel and Ethan Coen hail from. Frances McDormand stars as Marge Gunderson, a noticeably pregnant police chief whose affable, folksy demeanor only partially obscures the fact that she's a clever, observant, and very effective cop. When a pair of motorists are found slain not far from the corpse of a state trooper, Marge begins piecing together a twisted case. Steve Buscemi steals every scene he's in as a weaselly crook whose every word and gesture screams, "I'm Not From Around Here." William H. Macy performs a tour de force as a pathetically compelling mass of misguided motivation and bad choices. Despite the film's assured comic sensibility, the Coens bring a nail-biting tension to the murder scenes. And while most of the Coens’ films are remarkable for a gymnastic visual style, “Fargo” has a stark, clean look that's the perfect match for the chilly, near-monochrome of the snowy Midwestern landscape. It is this mix of humor with drama, and the juxtaposition of the implacable low-key nature of a small Minnesotan town with grisly crime, all against the stark winter backdrop, that makes “Fargo” seem surreal and yet very real all at once -- and that's a big part of its quirky but undeniable charm. Frances McDormand won the Best Actress Oscar for her role. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, March 31 8:10PM *"Pulp Fiction"* *John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, *Havey Keitel, Bruce Willis. *Directed by Quentin Tarantino.* 1994, 160mins. Color. Rated R. Quentin Tarantino’s outrageously violent yet ironically humorous “Pulp Fiction” is a remarkable stylistic pastiche and pop cultural funhouse, drawing from such disparate sources as hard-boiled crime novels of the 1930s, boxing movies, 1950s and ‘70s kitsch, Howard Hawks, Jean-Luc Goddard, American gangster movies, David Mamet, the wacky violence of Looney Tunes and other cartoons, Hong Kong action flicks, and Japanese anime, that plays out in a fragmented story telling structure arguably reminiscent of Citizen Kane, with brilliant if purposely wordy dialogue. The Oscar-winning script by Tarantino and Roger Avary weaves a twisted morality play as it joins the eventually intersecting storylines of Los Angeles mobsters, fringe players, small-time criminals, and a mysterious briefcase. Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta, in the role that single-handedly reignited his career, are hit men who have philosophical discussions on their way to and from “work”. Bruce Willis is a boxer out of a 1940s B-movie. Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Eric Stoltz, Rosanna Arquette, Ving Rhames and Christopher Walken are among those who come in, out, and back into the story as it loops back on itself. Uma Thurman was launched into the “A” list of stars because of her role, which includes a dance sequence with Travolta that proved an instant classic. The surreal yet realistic atmosphere, long takes, and wittily pop-literate non-stop dialogue emotionally engage the viewer in the minutiae of the characters' experiences even as the film also comments on their status as pulp creations, rendering the moments of shockingly baroque violence simultaneously ghastly and humorous. There really had been nothing like Pulp Fiction before. Arguably it was a cultural watershed in its aestheticization of violence. Unquestionably, it was one of the most influential American movies of the 1990s. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources.+ + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts enter. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  3. Deadpan Crime *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened in 35mm on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, March 30 8PM *"The Big Lebowski"* *Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Julianne Moore, *Steve Buscemi. *D 1998, 127mins. Color. Rated R. The Coen Brothers (Joel directed and co-wrote the screenplay; Ethan co-wrote and produced) tend to put a distinct stamp on everything they do. Sometimes, the result is a movie that is embraced with cult-like devotion by some and loathed by others – with little room in between. So it is with this gleefully absurd film. The plot of this Raymond Chandler-esque comedy crime caper from the Coens pivots around a case of mistaken identity complicated by extortion, double-crosses, deception, embezzlement, sex, pot, and gallons of White Russians (made with fresh cream, please). Having said that, the film doesn't really have much use for established storytelling techniques: it's more of a series of bizarre vignettes, which might be a problem if they weren't so funny. The title character, brilliantly played by Jeff Bridges, is a latter-day, stoner version of Philip Marlowe; it's one of the many homages the Coens make to films of decades past. The supporting players -- including John Goodman as Lebowski's buddy, and John Turturro as the wonderfully profane bowling champ Jesus -- are excellent as well. The soundtrack includes Bob Dylan, Yma Sumac, Moondog, Captain Beefheart, and the Sons of the Pioneers. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, March 31 6PM * "Fargo" * *Frances McDormand, William H. Macy, Steve Buscemi, *Peter Stormare, Harve Presnell. *Directed by Joel Coen.* 1996, 97mins, Color. Rated R. Unlike the Coen Brother’s “The Big Lebowski”, “Fargo” unwinds more or less in traditional, linear storytelling. What is unusual about the film is how successfully it manages to be both an absurdist comedy AND an edgy, stylized crime drama at the same time. While the movie never shies away from the grim facts or graphic consequences of the kidnapping and multiple murders at the core of the narrative, “Fargo” does manage to skate playfully into a dryly comic (but also, oddly affectionate) look at life in the frozen wastes of Minnesota, where Joel and Ethan Coen hail from. Frances McDormand stars as Marge Gunderson, a noticeably pregnant police chief whose affable, folksy demeanor only partially obscures the fact that she's a clever, observant, and very effective cop. When a pair of motorists are found slain not far from the corpse of a state trooper, Marge begins piecing together a twisted case. Steve Buscemi steals every scene he's in as a weaselly crook whose every word and gesture screams, "I'm Not From Around Here." William H. Macy performs a tour de force as a pathetically compelling mass of misguided motivation and bad choices. Despite the film's assured comic sensibility, the Coens bring a nail-biting tension to the murder scenes. And while most of the Coens’ films are remarkable for a gymnastic visual style, “Fargo” has a stark, clean look that's the perfect match for the chilly, near-monochrome of the snowy Midwestern landscape. It is this mix of humor with drama, and the juxtaposition of the implacable low-key nature of a small Minnesotan town with grisly crime, all against the stark winter backdrop, that makes “Fargo” seem surreal and yet very real all at once -- and that's a big part of its quirky but undeniable charm. Frances McDormand won the Best Actress Oscar for her role. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, March 31 8:10PM *"Pulp Fiction"* *John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, *Havey Keitel, Bruce Willis. *Directed by Quentin Tarantino.* 1994, 160mins. Color. Rated R. Quentin Tarantino’s outrageously violent yet ironically humorous “Pulp Fiction” is a remarkable stylistic pastiche and pop cultural funhouse, drawing from such disparate sources as hard-boiled crime novels of the 1930s, boxing movies, 1950s and ‘70s kitsch, Howard Hawks, Jean-Luc Goddard, American gangster movies, David Mamet, the wacky violence of Looney Tunes and other cartoons, Hong Kong action flicks, and Japanese anime, that plays out in a fragmented story telling structure arguably reminiscent of Citizen Kane, with brilliant if purposely wordy dialogue. The Oscar-winning script by Tarantino and Roger Avary weaves a twisted morality play as it joins the eventually intersecting storylines of Los Angeles mobsters, fringe players, small-time criminals, and a mysterious briefcase. Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta, in the role that single-handedly reignited his career, are hit men who have philosophical discussions on their way to and from “work”. Bruce Willis is a boxer out of a 1940s B-movie. Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Eric Stoltz, Rosanna Arquette, Ving Rhames and Christopher Walken are among those who come in, out, and back into the story as it loops back on itself. Uma Thurman was launched into the “A” list of stars because of her role, which includes a dance sequence with Travolta that proved an instant classic. The surreal yet realistic atmosphere, long takes, and wittily pop-literate non-stop dialogue emotionally engage the viewer in the minutiae of the characters' experiences even as the film also comments on their status as pulp creations, rendering the moments of shockingly baroque violence simultaneously ghastly and humorous. There really had been nothing like Pulp Fiction before. Arguably it was a cultural watershed in its aestheticization of violence. Unquestionably, it was one of the most influential American movies of the 1990s. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources.+ + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts enter. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  4. Better Than "Best" *3 Great Films That Didn't Win An Oscar For Best Picture* *-- But Maybe Should Have* All From Paramount Pictures, To Celebrate 100 Years of that Great American Movie Studio *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened in 35mm on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, February 24 8PM * "Ferris Bueller’s Day Off * *"* *Starring Mathew Broderick*, Allan Ruck, Mia Sara, Jeffery Jones. Directed by John Hughes 1986, 103mins., Color Every once in a while, a movie comes along that manages to speak so clearly and directly to its generation’s collective consciousness that it becomes a cultural touchstone. In this case, it is the generation that came to age in the 1980s. Teenaged Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) is a legend in his own time thanks to his uncanny skill at cutting classes and getting away with it. Intending to make one last grand duck-out before graduation, Ferris calls in sick, "borrows" a Ferrari, and embarks on a one-day bacchanal through the streets of Chicago. Dogging Ferris' trail at every turn is high-school principal Mr. Rooney (Jeffrey Jones), determined to catch Bueller in the act of class-cutting. Admittedly, this story could have amounted to a very slight, cartoon-like or tedious film. But Broderick imbues Ferris with just the right level of smirky, confident, collar-up attitude to make this teenage fantasy seem plausible. And there are enthusiastic, just-right turns from the supporting players as well, with Jones shining particularly in the role of the over-zealous high-school principal. Even some of the smaller roles are memorable: look for great cameos from Ben Stein and Charlie Sheen. Writer/director John Hughes usually tries to blend satire, slapstick, and social commentary, sometimes with mixed results. But the admixture actually works well here, making points about status, friendship, authority, and emotional neglect that not only resonate with anyone who's found him- or herself in that void between childhood and adulthood, but which also fit neatly around the film’s overall comic flow. So beyond its 80’s cult status, “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” is goofy and slapstick, but also endearingly sweet and even philosophical – a nice little modern classic that can be enjoyed by everyone. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, February 25, 6PM * "Double Indemnity" * *Starring Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray, Edward G. Robinson.* Directed by Billy Wilder. 1944, 107mins. B&W Directed by Billy Wilder and adapted from a James M. Cain novel by Wilder and Raymond Chandler, “Double Indemnity” represents the high-water mark of 1940s film noir urban crime dramas in which a greedy, weak man is seduced and trapped by a cold, evil woman amidst the dark shadows and expressionist lighting of modern cities. Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) seduces insurance agent Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) into murdering her husband to collect his accident policy. The murder goes as planned, but after the couple's passion cools, each becomes suspicious of the other's motives. The plan is further complicated when Neff's boss Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson), a brilliant insurance investigator, takes over the investigation. Told in flashbacks from Neff's perspective, the film moves with ruthless determinism as each character meets what seems to be a preordained fate. Movie veterans Stanwyck, MacMurray, and Robinson give some of their best performances, and Wilder's cynical sensibility finds a perfect match in the story's unsentimental perspective, heightened by John Seitz's hard-edged cinematography. Double Indemnity ranks with the classics of mainstream Hollywood movie-making. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, February 25 8:20PM * "Psycho" * *Starring Anthony Perkins & Janet Leigh. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. *1960, 120 mins., B&W The infamous shower scene is now part of our collective cultural consciousness, so it’s easy to forget just how ground-breaking Psycho was in 1960. Perhaps no American movie before had been more direct and unapologetic about violence or served it up with such disorienting abruptness and even tongue-in-cheek wit. Fleeting nudity, a casual depiction of sex outside marriage, and a focus on the psychological subtext of a murderer’s personality were also shockingly new to the screen. Janet Leigh is bored by her menial job in a real estate office and frustrated in her romance with a hardware store manager. On a whim, she takes off one afternoon with $40,000 that she was supposed to deposit into her employer’s bank account. Thirty six hours later paranoia and exhaustion have started to set in, and Leigh decides to stop for the night at the Bates Motel, where nervous but personable innkeeper Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) cheerfully mentions that she's the first guest in weeks. He then regales her with odd stories about his mother. There's hardly a film fan alive who doesn't know what happens next, but in addition to the shower scene there are dozens of memorable bits throughout this film. With “Psycho”, director Alfred Hitchcock re-wrote the rules for what a thriller could and should be. But often, a groundbreaking film will seem disappointingly ordinary and tame when viewed years later in the wake of succeeding films that try to push boundaries even further. What is truly remarkable about Psycho is that 52 years later it is still genuinely terrifying, as much or more so than anything else ever seen on the screen. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compi + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts enter. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  5. *3 Great Films That Didn't Win An Oscar For Best Picture* *-- But Maybe Should Have* All From Paramount Pictures, To Celebrate 100 Years of that Great American Movie Studio *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened in 35mm on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, February 24 8PM * "Ferris Bueller’s Day Off * *"* *Starring Mathew Broderick*, Allan Ruck, Mia Sara, Jeffery Jones. Directed by John Hughes 1986, 103mins., Color Every once in a while, a movie comes along that manages to speak so clearly and directly to its generation’s collective consciousness that it becomes a cultural touchstone. In this case, it is the generation that came to age in the 1980s. Teenaged Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) is a legend in his own time thanks to his uncanny skill at cutting classes and getting away with it. Intending to make one last grand duck-out before graduation, Ferris calls in sick, "borrows" a Ferrari, and embarks on a one-day bacchanal through the streets of Chicago. Dogging Ferris' trail at every turn is high-school principal Mr. Rooney (Jeffrey Jones), determined to catch Bueller in the act of class-cutting. Admittedly, this story could have amounted to a very slight, cartoon-like or tedious film. But Broderick imbues Ferris with just the right level of smirky, confident, collar-up attitude to make this teenage fantasy seem plausible. And there are enthusiastic, just-right turns from the supporting players as well, with Jones shining particularly in the role of the over-zealous high-school principal. Even some of the smaller roles are memorable: look for great cameos from Ben Stein and Charlie Sheen. Writer/director John Hughes usually tries to blend satire, slapstick, and social commentary, sometimes with mixed results. But the admixture actually works well here, making points about status, friendship, authority, and emotional neglect that not only resonate with anyone who's found him- or herself in that void between childhood and adulthood, but which also fit neatly around the film’s overall comic flow. So beyond its 80’s cult status, “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” is goofy and slapstick, but also endearingly sweet and even philosophical – a nice little modern classic that can be enjoyed by everyone. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, February 25, 6PM * "Double Indemnity" * *Starring Barbara Stanwyck, Fred MacMurray, Edward G. Robinson.* Directed by Billy Wilder. 1944, 107mins. B&W Directed by Billy Wilder and adapted from a James M. Cain novel by Wilder and Raymond Chandler, “Double Indemnity” represents the high-water mark of 1940s film noir urban crime dramas in which a greedy, weak man is seduced and trapped by a cold, evil woman amidst the dark shadows and expressionist lighting of modern cities. Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) seduces insurance agent Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) into murdering her husband to collect his accident policy. The murder goes as planned, but after the couple's passion cools, each becomes suspicious of the other's motives. The plan is further complicated when Neff's boss Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson), a brilliant insurance investigator, takes over the investigation. Told in flashbacks from Neff's perspective, the film moves with ruthless determinism as each character meets what seems to be a preordained fate. Movie veterans Stanwyck, MacMurray, and Robinson give some of their best performances, and Wilder's cynical sensibility finds a perfect match in the story's unsentimental perspective, heightened by John Seitz's hard-edged cinematography. Double Indemnity ranks with the classics of mainstream Hollywood movie-making. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, February 25 8:20PM * "Psycho" * *Starring Anthony Perkins & Janet Leigh. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. *1960, 120 mins., B&W The infamous shower scene is now part of our collective cultural consciousness, so it’s easy to forget just how ground-breaking Psycho was in 1960. Perhaps no American movie before had been more direct and unapologetic about violence or served it up with such disorienting abruptness and even tongue-in-cheek wit. Fleeting nudity, a casual depiction of sex outside marriage, and a focus on the psychological subtext of a murderer’s personality were also shockingly new to the screen. Janet Leigh is bored by her menial job in a real estate office and frustrated in her romance with a hardware store manager. On a whim, she takes off one afternoon with $40,000 that she was supposed to deposit into her employer’s bank account. Thirty six hours later paranoia and exhaustion have started to set in, and Leigh decides to stop for the night at the Bates Motel, where nervous but personable innkeeper Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) cheerfully mentions that she's the first guest in weeks. He then regales her with odd stories about his mother. There's hardly a film fan alive who doesn't know what happens next, but in addition to the shower scene there are dozens of memorable bits throughout this film. With “Psycho”, director Alfred Hitchcock re-wrote the rules for what a thriller could and should be. But often, a groundbreaking film will seem disappointingly ordinary and tame when viewed years later in the wake of succeeding films that try to push boundaries even further. What is truly remarkable about Psycho is that 52 years later it is still genuinely terrifying, as much or more so than anything else ever seen on the screen. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compi + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts enter. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  6. LoewsJersey

    WW II at the Movies

    Remembering *All Titles Screened in 35mm on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, November 18 8PM *"The Train" Starring Burt Lancaster & Paul Scofield. Directed by John Frankenheimer. *1964, 133mins, B&W. Based on an actual WWII incident, the movie is a rare combination of exceptional action sequences with a dramatic and thought-provoking narrative. Shooting on location in deep focus black-and-white, using real trains, train yards and stations, and surrounding stars Burt Lancaster and Paul Scofield with a French supporting cast, director John Frankenheimer created a galvanizing realism that not only gives an extraordinary look to the film but also reinforces palpable tension while underlining the human cost of a mission that offers only symbolic rewards. The depth of characterization created by the screenwriters and actors renders the action – and its outcome – all the more potent. The extensive photography of real steam trains and train facilities, especially in action sequences, is a key ingredient in the movie’s thrilling realism, but is also, it must be said, a true treat for rail enthusiasts. And Lancaster famously did his own stunt work, adding an extra degree of realism to the action and intensity to his typically powerful performance. The influence of the intelligently and superbly composed thrills of “The Train” can be seen in Bullitt (1968), The French Connection (1971) and Speed (1994). * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, November 19 6PM (sharp) *“Saboteur”* *Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. *Starring Robert Cummings, Priscilla Lane, Norman Lloyd. !942, 115mins., B&W. An American aircraft plant worker is accused of sabotaging his factory and causing the death of a co-worker just as the US is entering WWII. But in truth, the worker is a fall guy of a devious ring of Nazi spies headed up by a seemingly solid citizen. The wrongly accused man sets out on a desperate chase to find the genuine saboteur, all the while being pursued himself by the police. Along the way, he acquires a beautiful but reluctant “traveling” companion. Of course, there’s great tension, action and even a little bit of humor as the two make their way across the country. If these plot elements are not exactly unfamiliar to Hitchcock fans, here the “Master” is certainly in top form, blending them into one of his most suspenseful films. It’s worth noting that movies related to WWII that were made during the war were often intended not just to entertain, but to warn of the dangers of domestic espionage, inspire patriotism and reassure audiences that liberty would triumph in the end. “Saboteur” did all of these things, and ends with one of the most memorable and stirring scenes of any war related film. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, November 19 8:20PM *“Bridge on the River Kwai” Starring Alec Guinness, William Holden, Sessue Hayakawa. *Directed by David Lean. 1957, 161mins, Color. “The Bridge on the River Kwai” ranks as one of the greatest films of all time, combining sweeping visuals with human scale, and is arguably director David Lean's best film. It is a riveting dramatization of the peculiar cruelty of the Pacific Theatre in WWII, and of the madness and bravery inherent in all war. The story is loosely based on the historical construction of the Burma Railway by the POWs and forced civilian conscripts who were used by the occupying Japanese as slave labor. Alec Guinness is British Col. Nicholson, commander of the POWs who are ordered by Japanese commandant Col. Saito (Sessue Hayakawa) to build a bridge over a nearby river. Though he refuses at first, the British officer ultimately agrees and, unexpectedly, becomes obsessed with building the bridge to the highest standards, losing sight of the fact that his obsession will benefit his enemy. William Holden is an escaped POW sent back with commandos to destroy the bridge. The film is famous in part for its depiction of the brutal conditions of Japanese POW camps – which, in real life, were even harsher than shown in the movie. The cinematography is also striking, with vivid location filming in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). But the heart of the film is Alec Guinness’ performance as the obsessively principled Col. Nicholson. In a lesser film and with a lesser actor, the character might have been simplified into a madman or martyr, but in “The Bridge on the River Kwai” no significant character is either purely a hero or purely a villain, and Guinness truly animates this ambiguity. The film's closing line is among the best-known and most enigmatic closings in screen history. The film received seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor (Guinness). * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources.+ + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts enter. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders. WW II at the Movies ** *In honor of the upcoming 70th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor* *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace*
  7. Classic Horrors . . . Laughs . . . & Chills On the Big Screen for Halloween Weekend *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, October 28 8PM *The House On Haunted Hill Starring Vincent Price.* Directed by William Castle. 1958 75mins. B&W. There can be a very fine line between horror and camp in the movies, and too often it is crossed from former to latter unintentionally, with less than good result. But William Castle, an auteur of 1950s B movie making, deliberately set out to blend the two by telling outlandishly macabre stories with a mischievous wink to his audience. "The House On Haunted Hill" is perhaps his best work. Vincent Price lives in a foreboding mansion where seven murders have been committed. To a small group that's gathered in the mansion, he offers $10,000 to anyone who can stay and survive the night there. Needless to say, bad things soon start happening. A great deal of the film's success owes to Price, who alternated between pure ham and quiet subtlety with remarkable aplomb and great effect. Price had begun his association with macabre horror a few years earlier in “House of Wax“, but here he cemented his star status in the horror genre. Though almost everything about “The House on Haunted Hill” has since been copied, the original still seems fresh and fun. Don't miss this chance to see it back on the big screen, and while you’re at it, celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Vincent Price's birth. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 6PM *Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein* *Also starring Bela Lugosi & Lon Chaney, Jr.* 1948 83mins. B&W. This movie is really two for one because in addition to Abbott & Costello, the three most iconic characters of Universal Picture's now legendary classic horror are brought together here: Dracula is in search of a "simple, pliable" brain with which to revive the long dormant Frankenstein Monster. It turns out that the "ideal" brain belongs to the hapless Lou Costello. Soon, Laurence Talbot, better known as The Wolf Man, arrives to warn Costello and his pal Bud Abbott about Dracula's plans. Both horror and hilarity ensue. What makes this movie so good is that the monsters are played more or less straight and not for laughs even as they are matched against the trademark comedy of Abbott and Costello. What's even more remarkable is that two of the three are played by the actors who created them on screen: Lon Chaney, Jr. in his signature role as The Wolf Man and Bela Lugosi as Dracula; remarkably, though he played numerous vampire and vampire-like characters over the years, this was the first time since creating the role in 1931 that Lugosi again played "Dracula" -- a character that is owned on film by Universal. (Boris Karloff turned down the request to reprise his most famous role, so Frankenstein's Monster was played by Glenn Strange.) Fans of classic comedy AND classic horror won't be disappointed. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 8:15PM *The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari* *Starring Werner Krauss, Conrad Veidt. *Directed by Robert Wiene. 1919 69mins. B&W. Silent. Seeing this landmark, famously creepy movie back on the big screen with live organ accompaniment isn't "just" a screening -- it's a spectacular Halloween event. Long before the demented horror of Psycho, before the stylized sets and long shadows of Universal horror movies, even before the Expressionist-infused Nosferatu -- there was The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, a horror story involving hypnotism, madness, sleepwalking, murder, and sexual threat. Upon its release, it was hailed both in Germany and the United States as a masterpiece that elevated moving pictures to the realm of high art. Its highly stylized, often nightmare-like sets, stark lighting and shadows, and angled cinematography perfectly fit its theme of madness and disorientation, and made it perhaps the most visually striking movie yet produced. It defined the look of German Expressionist cinema -- which went on to influence American horror films, Orson Welles, Film Noir, Hitchcock, and more. Long hailed as a cinematic landmark, virtually every aspect of the film has been discussed and lauded. But the most fundamental and remarkable thing about the movie is its enduring power to scare the viewer. From the aghast faces in the very first shot to the final chilling scene, it remains a very frightening movie. Nearly a century's worth of movie making, including special effects and budgets that could not be dreamed of in 1919, has produced few films that can compare. (And yes, the man playing the hypnotist's "somnambulist" is a young Conrad Veidt, who 23 years later and a continent away would play Major Strasser in Casablanca.) * $9 for Adults, $7 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compi + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  8. Classic Horrors . . . Laughs . . . & Chills On the Big Screen for Halloween Weekend *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, October 28 8PM *The House On Haunted Hill Starring Vincent Price.* Directed by William Castle. 1958 75mins. B&W. There can be a very fine line between horror and camp in the movies, and too often it is crossed from former to latter unintentionally, with less than good result. But William Castle, an auteur of 1950s B movie making, deliberately set out to blend the two by telling outlandishly macabre stories with a mischievous wink to his audience. "The House On Haunted Hill" is perhaps his best work. Vincent Price lives in a foreboding mansion where seven murders have been committed. To a small group that's gathered in the mansion, he offers $10,000 to anyone who can stay and survive the night there. Needless to say, bad things soon start happening. A great deal of the film's success owes to Price, who alternated between pure ham and quiet subtlety with remarkable aplomb and great effect. Price had begun his association with macabre horror a few years earlier in “House of Wax“, but here he cemented his star status in the horror genre. Though almost everything about “The House on Haunted Hill” has since been copied, the original still seems fresh and fun. Don't miss this chance to see it back on the big screen, and while you’re at it, celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Vincent Price's birth. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 6PM *Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein* *Also starring Bela Lugosi & Lon Chaney, Jr.* 1948 83mins. B&W. This movie is really two for one because in addition to Abbott & Costello, the three most iconic characters of Universal Picture's now legendary classic horror are brought together here: Dracula is in search of a "simple, pliable" brain with which to revive the long dormant Frankenstein Monster. It turns out that the "ideal" brain belongs to the hapless Lou Costello. Soon, Laurence Talbot, better known as The Wolf Man, arrives to warn Costello and his pal Bud Abbott about Dracula's plans. Both horror and hilarity ensue. What makes this movie so good is that the monsters are played more or less straight and not for laughs even as they are matched against the trademark comedy of Abbott and Costello. What's even more remarkable is that two of the three are played by the actors who created them on screen: Lon Chaney, Jr. in his signature role as The Wolf Man and Bela Lugosi as Dracula; remarkably, though he played numerous vampire and vampire-like characters over the years, this was the first time since creating the role in 1931 that Lugosi again played "Dracula" -- a character that is owned on film by Universal. (Boris Karloff turned down the request to reprise his most famous role, so Frankenstein's Monster was played by Glenn Strange.) Fans of classic comedy AND classic horror won't be disappointed. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 8:15PM *The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari* *Starring Werner Krauss, Conrad Veidt. *Directed by Robert Wiene. 1919 69mins. B&W. Silent. Seeing this landmark, famously creepy movie back on the big screen with live organ accompaniment isn't "just" a screening -- it's a spectacular Halloween event. Long before the demented horror of Psycho, before the stylized sets and long shadows of Universal horror movies, even before the Expressionist-infused Nosferatu -- there was The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, a horror story involving hypnotism, madness, sleepwalking, murder, and sexual threat. Upon its release, it was hailed both in Germany and the United States as a masterpiece that elevated moving pictures to the realm of high art. Its highly stylized, often nightmare-like sets, stark lighting and shadows, and angled cinematography perfectly fit its theme of madness and disorientation, and made it perhaps the most visually striking movie yet produced. It defined the look of German Expressionist cinema -- which went on to influence American horror films, Orson Welles, Film Noir, Hitchcock, and more. Long hailed as a cinematic landmark, virtually every aspect of the film has been discussed and lauded. But the most fundamental and remarkable thing about the movie is its enduring power to scare the viewer. From the aghast faces in the very first shot to the final chilling scene, it remains a very frightening movie. Nearly a century's worth of movie making, including special effects and budgets that could not be dreamed of in 1919, has produced few films that can compare. (And yes, the man playing the hypnotist's "somnambulist" is a young Conrad Veidt, who 23 years later and a continent away would play Major Strasser in Casablanca.) * $9 for Adults, $7 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compi + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  9. LoewsJersey

    The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

    I agree wholeheartedly. This is one of the greatest movies I've ever seen.
  10. Classic Horrors . . . Laughs . . . & Chills On the Big Screen for Halloween Weekend *At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre* *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] *A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace* *All Titles Screened on our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* Friday, October 28 8PM *The House On Haunted Hill Starring Vincent Price.* Directed by William Castle. 1958 75mins. B&W. There can be a very fine line between horror and camp in the movies, and too often it is crossed from former to latter unintentionally, with less than good result. But William Castle, an auteur of 1950s B movie making, deliberately set out to blend the two by telling outlandishly macabre stories with a mischievous wink to his audience. "The House On Haunted Hill" is perhaps his best work. Vincent Price lives in a foreboding mansion where seven murders have been committed. To a small group that's gathered in the mansion, he offers $10,000 to anyone who can stay and survive the night there. Needless to say, bad things soon start happening. A great deal of the film's success owes to Price, who alternated between pure ham and quiet subtlety with remarkable aplomb and great effect. Price had begun his association with macabre horror a few years earlier in “House of Wax“, but here he cemented his star status in the horror genre. Though almost everything about “The House on Haunted Hill” has since been copied, the original still seems fresh and fun. Don't miss this chance to see it back on the big screen, and while you’re at it, celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Vincent Price's birth. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 6PM *Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein* *Also starring Bela Lugosi & Lon Chaney, Jr.* 1948 83mins. B&W. This movie is really two for one because in addition to Abbott & Costello, the three most iconic characters of Universal Picture's now legendary classic horror are brought together here: Dracula is in search of a "simple, pliable" brain with which to revive the long dormant Frankenstein Monster. It turns out that the "ideal" brain belongs to the hapless Lou Costello. Soon, Laurence Talbot, better known as The Wolf Man, arrives to warn Costello and his pal Bud Abbott about Dracula's plans. Both horror and hilarity ensue. What makes this movie so good is that the monsters are played more or less straight and not for laughs even as they are matched against the trademark comedy of Abbott and Costello. What's even more remarkable is that two of the three are played by the actors who created them on screen: Lon Chaney, Jr. in his signature role as The Wolf Man and Bela Lugosi as Dracula; remarkably, though he played numerous vampire and vampire-like characters over the years, this was the first time since creating the role in 1931 that Lugosi again played "Dracula" -- a character that is owned on film by Universal. (Boris Karloff turned down the request to reprise his most famous role, so Frankenstein's Monster was played by Glenn Strange.) Fans of classic comedy AND classic horror won't be disappointed. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, October 29 8:15PM *The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari* *Starring Werner Krauss, Conrad Veidt. *Directed by Robert Wiene. 1919 69mins. B&W. Silent. Seeing this landmark, famously creepy movie back on the big screen with live organ accompaniment isn't "just" a screening -- it's a spectacular Halloween event. Long before the demented horror of Psycho, before the stylized sets and long shadows of Universal horror movies, even before the Expressionist-infused Nosferatu -- there was The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, a horror story involving hypnotism, madness, sleepwalking, murder, and sexual threat. Upon its release, it was hailed both in Germany and the United States as a masterpiece that elevated moving pictures to the realm of high art. Its highly stylized, often nightmare-like sets, stark lighting and shadows, and angled cinematography perfectly fit its theme of madness and disorientation, and made it perhaps the most visually striking movie yet produced. It defined the look of German Expressionist cinema -- which went on to influence American horror films, Orson Welles, Film Noir, Hitchcock, and more. Long hailed as a cinematic landmark, virtually every aspect of the film has been discussed and lauded. But the most fundamental and remarkable thing about the movie is its enduring power to scare the viewer. From the aghast faces in the very first shot to the final chilling scene, it remains a very frightening movie. Nearly a century's worth of movie making, including special effects and budgets that could not be dreamed of in 1919, has produced few films that can compare. (And yes, the man playing the hypnotist's "somnambulist" is a young Conrad Veidt, who 23 years later and a continent away would play Major Strasser in Casablanca.) * $9 for Adults, $7 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - * + **Film descriptions are compi + + *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  11. LoewsJersey

    The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)

    Capers For Money, Love or Laughs In The Movies At The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre *54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306* *Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 W[|http://www.loewsjersey.org/] * A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace * * All Titles Screened in 35mm * *On our BIG 50ft Wide Screen* ** ** * * Friday, September 23 at 8PM + The Original + *The Thomas Crown Affair Starring Steve McQueen, Faye Dunaway, Paul Burke. *Directed by Norman Jewison. 1968. 102 mins. MPAA: R This stylish romantic caper begins as a cat-and-mouse game between a wealthy businessman (Steve McQueen, in a rare cerebral role), who has masterminded a spectacularly complex bank heist for his own amusement, and the brilliant insurance investigator (Faye Dunaway) assigned to the case. But the film slides into a higher gear when the two fall for each other, capitalizing on the powerful chemistry of the two stars, who were never photographed as stunningly as here by the legendary Haskell Wexler. In a celebrated six-minute set piece, a wordless chess game between the two develops into an increasingly intense pas de deux of visual foreplay. The wariness of the couple, who can never entirely trust one another, only heightens the atmosphere of erotic frisson. The catchy score by Michel Legrand is layered with interlocking ostinatos which echo the film's visual motif of circularity, while adding an undercurrent of playfulness. In both its look and feel, the film is a great time capsule of the 1960s. But mostly, it is masterfully concocted entertainment. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, September 24 6:15PM * Take The Money And Run * *Starring Woody Allen, Janet Margolin, Marcel Hillaire. *Directed by Woody Allen. 1969. 85 mins. MPAA: PG This was Woody Allen’s directorial debut, and if his later style came to epitomize a dry wit with a manic undertow, here “manic” definitely has the upper hand. It’s a goofy mock documentary about the career of a bumbling criminal, played by Allen with his signature - some would say neurotic - use of self deprecation to great comic effect. The film's most celebrated sequence involves Virgil's inability to write coherent holdup notes ("I have a gub"), but others include Virgil's losing battle with a recalcitrant coke machine. In his determination to cram in as many jokes and sight gags as possible, Allen presaged the uproarious style of later comedy films such as “Airplane!”. Contributing to the film are great supporting performances by Janet Margolin, Marcel Hillaire, and (uncredited) Louise Lasser, as well as the energetic musical score of Marvin Hamlisch. The movie is a genuinely hilarious comic gem. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * Saturday, September 24 8:15PM *The Sting* *Starring Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Robert Shaw. *Directed by George Roy Hill. 1973. 135mins. MPAA: PG The most obvious “sting” – or con – in “The Sting” is the elaborate hoax that con men Paul Newman and Robert Redford construct to fleece big time mobster Robert Shaw. But in a sense the movie is riddled with cons and contradictions being played on – and for the benefit of – the audience. Set in the grim time of Depression-era America amid crooks, thugs and people just down on their luck, but acted and directed with a deftly light touch, the movie keeps us wondering if it’s a comedy masquerading as a crime drama or vice versa. Cops are bad but con men are good – or maybe only seem good. The action unfolds in the Jazz Age of the ‘30s with sets and costumes that are meticulously period, but the jaunty soundtrack that adds so much to the atmosphere is ragtime, which in fact was popular 20 years earlier. And the script has so many twists and turns that sometimes it’s hard to tell what’s going on. But the biggest con of all is that if all of this sounds like a hopeless muddle – it’s not. Instead, it is great entertainment. Smart writing, confident direction, clever cinematography, a slick pace and high production are all important. But the success of the film is rooted in the great chemistry between Newman and Redford (who only worked together one other time, in 1969’s “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”). Shaw, Charles Durning, Ray Walston and a constellation of great supporting players all add in. And then there’s that irresistible soundtrack. The film won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. * $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). * * Press inquiries: * Colin Egan at (201) 798-[loewsjersey@gmail.com|mailto:loewsjersey@gmail.com]. *The Loew's Is Easy To Get To:* The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. *Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage* adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. *What’s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew’s?* The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre is one of America’s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting – on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew’s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. *PLUS – Live organ entrance music* (from the Loew’s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew’s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew’s, Inc. The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  12. Before the Censors 4 Notorious Pre-Code Films In 35mm At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Arts Center In A Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org Friday, January 28 at 8PM DOUBLE FEATURE: "Freaks" - - PLUS Mae West in "She Done Him Wrong" "Freaks" Directed by Tod Browning. 1932, 65mins., B&W. An extraordinary bit of film making that uses real circus sideshow performers to tell a story of love, deceit and revenge, with a frank-for-its-day approach to sexual gamesmanship and violent retribution. Though surprisingly non-exploitative of its characters, the movie scandalized audiences and helped ruin director Tod Browning's career. In recent years it has become a cult classic. "She Done Him Wrong" Starring Mae West, Cary Grant & Noah Beery, Sr. Directed by Lowell Sherman. 1933, 65mins., B&W. Mae West's first and best film, since it was not watered down by the subsequently ascendant censors. It is the ultimate distillation of her charismatic persona of simmering seduction and innuendo-laced one liners. Admission for the DOUBLE FEATURE: $8 Adults; $6 seniors (65+) and kids (12 & younger). Saturday, January 29 at 6:30PM "Morocco" Starring Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper & Adolphe Menjou. Directed by Joseph von Sternberg. 1930, 92mins., B&W. Dietrich's iconic performance in top hat and tails and her scandalous (for the day) kiss of another woman created her enduring screen persona of powerful yet androgynous eroticism. Admission: $6 adults / $4 seniors (65+) and kids (12 & younger). Saturday, January 29 at 8:30PM "Baby Face" Starring Barbara Stanwyck, George Brent. Directed by Alfred E. Green. 1933, 71mins., B&W. This amazingly frank drama about a woman sleeping her way to the top was one of the films most often decried by the advocates of movie censorship. Admission: $6 adults / $4 seniors (65+) and kids (12 & younger). The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  13. Remembering the Legendary Composer Bernard Herrmann on His Centenary with 3 Great Scores in 3 Great Movies At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace All Titles Screened in 35mm On our BIG 50ft Wide Screen Friday, June 10 8PM The Original Cape Fear Starring Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum, Polly Bergen. Directed by J. Lee Thompson. 1962, 106mins, B&W The original Cape Fear is a movie that etches a place in your memory, in large part due to Robert Mitchum, who plays a convicted rapist, just out of prison, who sets out methodically and ruthlessly to exact vengeance on Gregory Peck, the prosecutor who put him away, and on Peck?s wife and daughter. Mitchum, of course, was as an actor who was as at home playing the heavy as the hero. But in Cape Fear, he created one of the screen?s most devastatingly AND believably menacing characters by radiating a sickeningly false amiability. He is, simply put, evil incarnate. Peck, playing the straight-laced hero as usual, is the perfect counter-point in what becomes a psychotic game of cat and mouse, and his growing frustration and terror at his utter helplessness -- both legally and physically -- to head off what Mitchum is so relentlessly doing is devastatingly palpable. The supporting cast is excellent. And Bernard Herrmann?s haunting score is pitch-perfect. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, June 11 6PM The 7th Voyage of Sinbad Starring Kerwin Mathews, Kathryn Grant, Richard Eyer & Torin Thatcher. Special Effects by Ray Harryhausen. Directed by Nathan Juran. 1958 94mins color In the era of CGI, we tend to take for granted the seamless integration of fantastic monsters, flying objects and all manner of special effects into live action movies. But some of the most visually stunning and unforgettable scenes mixing live action and special effects were made long before the digital era, using stop motion photography --small clay models posed, photographed, re-posed and re-photographed over and over again to give the impression of movement. If Ray Harryhausen didn?t invent this technique, he certainly perfected it -- giving his stop motion creations an uncanny sense of really being alive -- and creating photographic techniques that seamlessly merged the stop motion footage with film of human actors into one scene. And beyond the high technical quality of Harryhausens?s work, there was an indefinable magic to his alchemic mix that inspired a far more deeply felt sense of fantasy and wonder than even today?s technically perfect computer creations can muster. One of Harryhausen?s best works, and his first in color, is The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, an Arabian Night-inspired tale of Sinbad as he sails the seas, forms an uneasy alliance with an evil magician and battles a Cyclops, a two-headed Roc and a magically resurrected skeleton. Other memorable effects include the genie Berani and the interior of his magic lamp, the Princess Parisa being shrunk to the size of a Barbie Doll, and the servant woman who is turned into a dancing half-woman, half-snake. The action starts right away and continues throughout the film, and Bernard Herrmann?s score is the perfect companion, adding mood that enhances the visual effects. Herrmann went on to score three more Harryhausen films in a collaboration that was equal in success to that of his famous work with Alfred Hitchcock. The 7th Voyage of Sinbad is one of the few movies that truly allows adults to suspend disbelief and enjoy it, no matter how often they?ve seen it before, with the thrill of undiluted wonder ? just as kids who see it for the first time do. Its magic is timeless. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, June 11 8:10PM The Man Who Knew Too Much Starring James Stewart & Doris Day. Directed by Alfred Hitchock. 1956, 120mins, Color The idea of an ordinary man finding himself caught in a web of intrigue and deceit of which he has no knowledge and seemingly little hope of understanding or escaping is a kind of delirium nightmare that touches upon fears that are instinctive to us all -- a modern life projection of the primal terror of sinking into quicksand. Perhaps not surprisingly, it was a theme to which The Master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock, returned time and again with unfailing success. And in this case, Hitchcock returned to the same story. He had made the original ?The Man Who Knew Too Much? in Britain in 1934. For this version, big American stars James Stewart and Doris Day headlined, the script was expanded by 45 minutes, color replaced black and white, and a magnificent score by frequent Hitchcock collaborator Bernard Herrmann was added (in a Hitchcock-like turn, Herrmann has a cameo in the film, playing the conductor of a symphony). But the basic story remains the same: American tourists Stewart and Day witness the killing of a Frenchman they've recently befriended. Just before dying, the man whispers a secret to Stewart (the Cinemascope lens turns this standard close-up into a truly grotesque vignette): a political assassination will occur during a concert at London's Albert Hall. But Stewart soon finds out that he dare not go to the police, because foreign agents have kidnapped his son to insure his silence. Stewart, as usual, is terrific. And Hitchcock was in wonderful form, stacking the thriller deck with incredible skill and aplomb, and coming up with a stunning 12-minute climax that is played without a single word of dialogue. Like all of The Master?s best work, this film is engrossing, intriguing, and captivating, and has many surprises even on repeated viewings. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  14. LoewsJersey

    Sunrise, Barry Lyndon, Days of Heaven

    Moving Images 3 Films That Are As Visually Stunning As They Are Dramatically Compelling At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace All Titles Screened in 35mm. Friday, May 20 7:45PM "Barry Lyndon" Starring Ryan O?Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee. Directed by Stanley Kubrick. 1975 184 mins. Color. Original MPAA Rating: PG. Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray's novel depicts the rise and fall of a sensitive Irish rogue in the British aristocracy. With a deliberate rhythm and intentionally muffled emotions, Kubrick orchestrates an absorbing, complex, and dryly witty tale packed with sex, violence, gambling, war, family feuds, romantic betrayals, love, death, and all the other things that make historical dramas so much fun. But as good as the script and sublimely subtle the acting is, the look of the film is what unquestionably raises Barry Lyndon into the realm of high art. Attempting to recreate both the aesthetic style of 18th century paintings and the physical look of the period, Kubrick, cinematographer John Alcott and production designer Ken Adam used authentic antique props and costumes to brilliant effect, and they lit their scenes with only natural sunlight or candles, for a look that no other movie has ever touched. The result is a film of singular visual style and beauty, and one of the richest and most evocative period pieces ever made. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, May 21 6PM "Days of Heaven" Starring Richard Gere, Brooke Adams, Sam Shepard, Linda Manz. Directed by Terrence Malick. 1978 95mins. Color. Original MPAA Rating: PG Terrence Malick's follow-up to his acclaimed 1973 debut ?Badlands? confirmed his reputation as a visual poet and narrative iconoclast. Inspired by the work of silent master F.W. Murnau, and shot in natural light primarily during the "magic hour" before sunset, Malick's spectacular imagery largely takes the place of conventional exposition and excessive dialogue. In 1916, Chicago steelworker Bill (Richard Gere, stepping in for John Travolta) flees to Texas with his little sister Linda (Linda Manz) and girlfriend Abby (Brooke Adams) after fatally erupting at his boss. Along with other itinerant laborers, they work the harvest at a wealthy, though ailing, farmer's ranch. The farmer (playwright Sam Shepard) falls in love with Abby, and, believing her to be Bill's sister, asks the three to stay on at his elysian spread. Seeing it as his one chance to escape poverty, Bill urges Abby to marry the sick man ? but marriage has more restorative powers, and the farmer more magnetism than Bill had anticipated. This tragic love triangle is told through brief, cryptic incidents as the expressive sequences of nature's radiance and brutality allude to the emotions brewing beneath the adults' cool surfaces, and child-observer Linda's jaded, distant voice-overs fill in the story. Ennio Morricone's delicate, dreamy score further complements the narrative restraint and sensory beauty. Despite great critical success, Days of Heaven failed to find an audience in 1978, and Malick took a 20-year sabbatical from directing before making The Thin Red Line (1998). Malick has been called the reclusive genius of American cinema, who makes a critically acclaimed movie -- only to disappear from the director's chair for years. His next film -- and only his third since Days of Heaven -- The Tree of Life, will open on May 27. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, May 21 8:15PM "Sunrise" George O?Brien & Janet Gaynor. Directed by F.W. Murnau. 1927. 110mins. Silent. B&W. Unrated, but suitable for most audiences. Considered by many to be the finest silent film ever made by a Hollywood studio, F.W. Murnau's Sunrise represents the art of the wordless cinema at its zenith, a movie of extraordinary visual beauty and emotional purity. Murnau?s graceful moving camera, expressive lighting, and superimpositions lyrically evoke the inner passion, pain, and romanticism that drive a love triangle among a simple country couple and a vamp-ish city woman. The streetscape and amusement park scenes that so effectively portray the dazzle and danger of the ?big city? remain marvels of set design eighty four years later. The story is poignant and the acting sublime; indeed, Janet Gaynor won the first-ever Best Actress Oscar for her role in Sunrise, along with her part in another film, Seventh Heaven. But it is the extraordinary Expressionist look of the film, so carefully crafted by Murnau and his cinematographers, fellow German imports Charles Roser and Karl Struss, that lifts the film into the realm of lyricism. Murnau found something extraordinary in everyday scenes, yet his most extraordinary visions never lost faith with reality. Roser and Struss won the first Best Photography Oscar. Ironically, this apex of silent cinema came just as the deluge of synchronized sound (or more specifically, dialogue) was about to wash away the whole silent era. Indeed, the box office failure of Sunrise is in part attributed to the release of ?The Jazz Singer?, which came just weeks after the premiere of Sunrise and weeks before it went into wider release. But the artistic impact of Sunrise survived to influence some of the most striking cinematography of the talkie era. $8 for Adults, $6 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  15. Cinema's First & Most Legendary Lover . . . VALENTINO Will Be Back On The Big Screen In "The Eagle" A RARE Screening of This Silent Classic in 35mm With Live Organ Accompaniment By Don Kinnier On May 1 at 3PM At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace Admission: $10 for Adults. Children 12 & younger free. Rudolph Valentino came through Ellis Island from Italy in 1913. He was just 18 years old, had no money and no prospects. Less than a decade later, he was one of the first matinee idols of the still-new Hollywood, an international super star almost before anyone had realized there could be such a thing. Unlike the other early movie stars, he seemed dark and exotic, and his celluloid persona quickly re-defined romance to millions of his (mostly female) fans. But his was a tragically shooting star. He died in 1926 of complications from appendicitis at age 31. Untold numbers of his fans wept in mass hysteria; a few killed themselves because they could not bear to live without him; and 100,000 lined up for his wake -- in what remains, to this day, one of the most extraordinary testaments of fan loyalty in our popular culture. All the heart-throbs who have flickered across the silver screen in the decades since have merely followed in his footsteps. So great was his appeal that his name still remains a synonym for suave lover, even to people who have never seen one of his movies. Though "The Eagle" was not one of Valentino's bigger box office success, it is now seen as perhaps his finest performance, and one of the best American dramas of the silent era. Based on a Pushkin novel, it is the story of a Russian Cossack who spurns the affections of his Czarina, Catherine the Great, because he does not want to be a kept consort. When his lands are seized, he is transformed into a kind of Robin Hood-like avenger of injustice. Valentino was at his most natural and appealing in this film, playing the Cossack with wit, humor and humanity -- and without a trace of the stiff posturing that marred some silent performances and which today we often mistakenly assume was the case with all silent film acting. He wore the elaborate period costumes as if they were his second skin, and moved with a dancer's grace and casual sexuality. In this film, it is certainly easy to understand his appeal to so many women. The story was action-packed and entertaining, the direction intelligent, and the cinematography was among the most poetic of the whole silent era. In addition, a banquet scene contains one of the most impressive tracking shots of the 1920s, belying the common misconception that cinematography in the silent era was devoid of technical prowess and dazzle. Vilma Banky was a delicately beautiful co-star, and the great Louise Dresser as the worldly Czarina was -- as always -- excellent. It is, in all respects, a great movie. Despite its latter day re-appraisal and appreciation, "The Eagle" is not often revived. Don't miss this rare chance to see it -- and its immortal star -- the way it (and he) were meant to be seen: on the Big Screen, accompanied by the power and beauty of a live pipe organ. **Film description was compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. "The Eagle" is presented by the Garden State Theatre Organ Society. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center.
  16. 1 "Matrix" + 2 "Things" = Sci-Fi on the Big Screen At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace Includes A Special Make/Remake Presentation! All Titles Screened in 35mm. Friday, April 29 8PM The Matrix Starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving. Directed by the Wachowski Brothers. 1999, 136mins., Color What if everything that we think is real about our world is instead unreal, a virtual reality created by malevolent, all-powerful computers to fool and enslave humans? That?s the conceit of ?The Matrix? ? and it gives writers/directors Andy and Larry Wachowski the basis for presenting some of the most amazing special effects ever seen on screen. Add in an unusual blend of influences ? Hong Kong martial arts films, Japanese anime, comic books, Philip K. Dick, mythology and religious mysticism ? and you get a dark, convoluted and action-packed film that was one of the biggest sci-fi titles of its decade. If the ever-more complicated story gets confusing enough at times to make you feel as if you've become hopelessly lost in the user's guide to the latest version of Windows -- that's the point: the film deliberately creates a kind of techno-intoxication to overload and confuse you, break your hold on the ordinary and numb you before completely overwhelming your senses with its special effects. Few films mess with your mind and cause your eyes to pop so far out of your head as "The Matrix". It is a must to be seen back on the Big Screen. Single Screening: $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). On Saturday, April 30, the Loew's presents a Make/Remake Special Presentation - the rare back-to-back screenings of an original version of a movie, followed by a later version: Saturday, April 30 6PM The Thing From Another World Starring Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan, Robert Cornthwaite, James Arness. Produced by Howard Hawks. Directed by Christian Nyby. 1951, 87mins., B&W. A flying saucer is discovered in the frozen Arctic, and scientists from a polar expedition plus a US Air Force team investigate. But there are no laser guns, helpless heroines, big bugs or other clich?s that you might expect in what was conceived of as a low budget ?B? sci-fi picture in the 1950s. Instead, there is an intelligent script; a fast pace; rapid-fire overlapping dialogue; a tight, controlled atmosphere; a smart and competent female character; and relaxed, natural performances -- all hallmarks of a movie by Howard Hawks (who produced the film, and probably directed it too, although without credit). The ?thing? itself is seen only in fleeting glances, a directorial decision that built incredible tension while also mostly avoiding the unintentionally funny ?man in a rubber suit? scenes that plague so many sci-fi films of the era. The cast is excellent, though none were stars. (James Arness would go on to become a star for his role in TV?s "Gunsmoke.") Underlying all is the palpable dread of a lurking, unforgiving enemy that gripped America in the McCarthy era. Critics have long debated the film?s allegorical implications of the US vs. Communist, force vs. diplomacy, military vs. science. But fully sixty years later, with the Cold War now but a memory, what endures is the film?s seminal mix of sci-fi, noir, and horror. It's the landmark prototype for subsequent sci-fi hybrids from "It! The Terror from Beyond Space" to "Alien", and, of course, John Carpenter's "The Thing". It will be shown at the Loew's in the studio's vault print on our 50ft wide screen. Single Screening: $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - OR, as part of our Make/Remake Combo: $10 adults, $8 Seniors & Children for the 2 "Things". Saturday, April 30 8:10PM John Carpenter's "The Thing" Starring Kurt Russell, A. Wilford Brimley, Richard Dysart, Richard Masur, Donald Moffat. Directed by John Carpenter. 1982, 108 mins., B&W. In the annals of Hollywood remakes, it is hard to find one that is more of a contradiction in terms than John Carpenter?s "The Thing?. On the one hand, the film is faithful to the broad outline of the original and successfully maintains its tight, almost claustrophobic feeling and palpable fear. The cast, as in the first film, is not exactly filled with marquee names, except for Kurt Russell, who gives one of his best performances. Like its predecessor, it?s part sci-fi and part horror. And just as in the original, the real appearance of the "thing" is left mostly to our imagination. But at the same time, the later film diverges from the original in key ways: It's cinematography is even more moody than the original and greatly adds to the film's stark, ominous feeling -- but does so in full color, not the B&W that's typical of the noir sensibility. It adds a good measure of who-done-it mystery, and is also spiked throughout by doses of black humor, some pretty graphic violence and impressive pre-CGI special effects -- all of which stand in stark contrast to the original, which deliberately eschewed humor and special effects and had little on-screen violence. The Cold War allusions of the earlier film are gone, and there is much less of an ?us vs. it? feeling than an even more paranoid ?you can?t trust anyone? mindset. And to top it off, the second film is actually truer to the short story that both films were based on. When it was released, John Carpenter?s "The Thing? was mostly panned as a debasement of the original. But time has lent perspective, and today the film is generally recognized as that most rare of remakes: not a copy, but a successful new adaptation that stems from distinct creative instincts and different sensibilities. In other words, you can enjoy John Carpenter?s "The Thing? without reference to, or taking away from the other ?Thing.? Single Screening: $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - OR, as part of our Make/Remake Combo: $10 adults, $8 Seniors & Children for the 2 "Things". Patrons who take advantage of our Make/Remake Combo will have the chance to vote for which "Thing" they feel is better! **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  17. A Comedy Smorgasbord On Screen Sturges, Burton & Edwards (in the Pink) At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace All Titles Screened in 35mm. Friday, March 25 at 8PM "The Lady Eve" Starring Barbara Stanwyck & Henry Fonda. Directed by Preston Sturges. 1941, 93 mins., B&W. Always the ironic satirist with a gift for terrific characters, improbably wild scenarios and perfectly tuned dialogue, the great writer/director Preston Sturges had what is, arguably, his most glittering success in ?The Lady Eve?. Without doubt, the film is one of the most sparklingly funny screwball comedies ever made, replete with beguilingly ribald sexual innuendo and such overt overtones about the appeals of dishonesty and criminality it?s a wonder that Sturges got away it all in the face of the puritanical Hollywood Production Code. Barbara Stanwyck is absolutely brilliant as she glides effortlessly from hard boiled to sensual to romantic, and back again. Henry Fonda is amazingly good in a rare comedic role as a nerdy innocent whom con-artist Stanwyck first plans to scam but then falls in love with. The romantic and cynical tables are turned several times in the ensuing battle of the sexes that is not only hilarious but surprisingly moving. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, March 26 at 6PM "Beetlejuice" Starring Michael Keaton, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin & Winona Ryder. Directed by Tim Burton. 1988, 92 mins., Color. A deliciously off-the-wall, fast paced comedy-horror, Beetlejuice was Tim Burton?s second feature ? and it not only defined his signature mix of wild imagination, sweetly fractured characters, surreal sensibility, gothic whimsy and dazzling special effects, but also firmly established him as one of the most original movie makers of our time. Geena Davis and Alec Baldwin are a young married couple who are killed in a car accident but are stuck haunting this world before they can move on to the next (shades of ?Topper?). When an obnoxious yuppie-esque couple and their unhappy, Goth-obsessed daughter (played by Catherine O?Hara, Jeffrey Jones and Winona Ryder in her break-out role) move in to their old home, Davis and Baldwin try to frighten them away. But when their fledgling haunting skills prove less than effective, the two turn in desperation to a veteran spook: a yellow-haired, profane and thoroughly gonzo spirit played to over-the-top perfection by Michael Keaton. And that?s when the unique Burton blend of comedy and the macabre really takes off. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, March 26 at 8:20PM "A Shot in the Dark" (Pink Panther) Starring Peter Sellers, Elke Sommer, Herbert Lom. Directed by Blake Edwards. 1964, 101 mins., Color. A comic triumph from beginning to end, ?A Shot in the Dark? is not only the funniest film in the famous Pink Panther series, but also one of the funniest, laugh-out-loud movies of all time. A murder has been committed at the palatial Parisian residence of George Sanders. All the evidence points to sexy, wide-eyed housemaid Elke Sommer. But then the gloriously, monumentally inept Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) arrives on the scene and sets out to prove her innocence. What follows is an unbroken series of impeccable gags played out at a mad pace. While Inspector Clouseau was first seen on screen as a character in the earlier ?The Pink Panther?, ?A Shot in the Dark? is the film that made the character central and truly established the Clouseau mythos: the festive clumsiness, the convoluted dialogue, the Fractured French ("A beump on zee head!"), the twitching lunacy of poor Chief Inspector Dreyfuss (Herbert Lom), the unexpected judo ?lessons" of Clouseau's houseboy Kato (Burt Kwouk), and of course the hilariously macabre jokes involving dead or seriously injured bystanders. Director Blake Edward?s sense of slapstick never worked better than here, teamed with Seller?s uncanny comic ability to seamlessly merge the outrageous with the subtle in perfect timing. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  18. Bogie & Bacall Back on the Big Screen . . . including 2 Noir classics! At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Landmark Movie Palace Friday, February 25 at 8PM "To Have and Have Not" Starring Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Walter Brennan. Directed by Howard Hawks. 1944, 100 mins., B&W. This is the movie that brought Bogart and Bacall together ? both on screen and off. Bogart is the owner of a charter boat in Vichy-controlled Martinique. Approached by Free French activists, Bogart doesn?t want to stick his neck out for them ? until doing so will help Bacall. If the screenplay by William Faulkner and Jules Furthman owes as much to Casablanca as to the Hemmingway novel they were adapting, it nevertheless is a terrific blend of romance and action leavened with comedy, and Howard Hawks? direction is, as usual, masterful. But what makes the film truly electric is the unmistakable chemistry that was boiling over for real between Bogart and Bacall as the cameras rolled. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, February 26 at 6PM "The Big Sleep" Starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall. Directed by Howard Hawks. 1946, 114 mins., B&W. One of the most popular Noir films and most influential detective movies ever made, The Big Sleep nevertheless has one of the most convoluted scripts of any movie made in classic Hollywood. Director Howard Hawks literally blew past red herrings and possible dead ends by letting dialogue and action spill out so fast that there is barely time to acknowledge, never mind contemplate, a new plot twist. But Hawks did slow down to let the audience fully appreciate the erotic innuendo in the repartee between Bogart's Philip Marlowe and Bacall's Mrs. Rutledge -- performances that were made palpable by the couple's real-life relationship. This was cutting edge stuff for a Hollywood still under the Production Code. It's the combination of this razor sharp sexual edge with the disquieting murky mystery that gives the film its distinctly hot yet cold, dream/nightmare feeling. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Saturday, February 26 at 8:30PM "Dark Passage" Starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall. Directed by Delmar Davis. 1947, 107 mins., B&W. A well constructed Film Noir that is one of the most darkly seductive but seldom revived pairings of Bogart & Bacall. Bogart is a man wrongly accused of his wife's murder who undergoes plastic surgery to conceal his identity. Bacall, more vulnerable here than in other roles, is a lonely heiress who shelters Bogie -- and falls for him -- while he tries to find his wife's real killer. The film makes great use not only of its stars' real life chemistry but also of its San Francisco setting. The Bay Area's hills and winding roads, world-famous bridges and even prison proximity are integral to the story, while the city's mixture of affluence and squalor, misfits and money men give texture to the shadowy atmosphere. The supporting cast more than hold their own, and Director Delmar Davis makes great use of the tight, efficient script. The opening scenes filmed from Bogart's perspective are especially effective, adding a distinct, perhaps even Hitchcock-ian feel. Don't miss this rare chance to see this Noir gem on the Big Screen. $7 for Adults, $5 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - **Film descriptions are compiled from various sources. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnelle Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre receives support from the City of Jersey City, Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy and the Municipal Council, and the Hudson County Open Space Trust Fund, administered by the Hudson County Division of Planning, Thomas A. DeGise, County Executive, and the Board of Chosen Freeholders.
  19. CLASSIC MOVIE HORROR At the Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Performing Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org -- All Screenings In 35mm -- Friday, October 22 8PM ?Brides of Dracula? Starring Peter Cushing, Yvonne Monlaur, Marita Hunt, David Peel, Freda Jackson. Directed by Terence Fisher. (1960, 86mins., Color) Suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). If Universal Pictures distilled and defined the horror movie in black & white during the 1930s and ?40s, the British studio Hammer Films re-imagined and redefined the genre in color beginning in the late 1950s. Brides of Dracula was the studio?s second vampire film, the sequel to its Horror of Dracula. A young woman is stranded in a foreboding Transylvanian village and encounters a handsome young Baron, who turns out to be a vampire. In her ignorance, the young woman looses the vampire upon a girl?s school -- and herself. Fortunately, the arch nemesis of all vampires, Dr. Van Helsing, arrives to help. Brides is one of the best examples of the revised conventions Hammer established for the gothic horror genre: in addition to the glorious color cinematography ? and especially bright red blood -- there are lavish sets, impressive costumes, and an even more potent erotic undertone (though certainly nothing explicit) than Universal ever dared suggest. In this, it is a precursor to the plethora of erotically charged vampire tales that have appeared in recent years. Strong performances, good writing, action and intrigue also make the film a horror classic. Saturday, October 23 6PM ?Son of Frankenstein? Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Basil Rathbone, Lionel Atwill. Directed by Rowland V. Lee. (1938, 99mins., B&W) Suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Boris Karloff as Frankenstein?s Monster is one of the most legendary performances in movie history. Karloff portrayed the Monster for the third and final time on the big screen in Son of Frankenstein. As if that wasn?t enough to make the film a classic, Karloff was joined by Bela Lugosi in what, arguably, was his finest Hollywood performance. When Dr. Frankenstein?s son, who has lived in America most of his life, returns to his ancestral home, he finds that local villagers still remember and fear his father?s creation. Goaded by a sinister man (Lugosi) living amid the ruins of his father?s castle, Frankenstein decides to revive his father?s Monster ? but to reform its brutish nature and thereby vindicate his father?s memory. Of course . . . things don?t work out as Frankenstein had planned! It would not have been surprising if this second sequel proved shop-worn, but Son of Frankenstein is a well crafted continuation of the Frankenstein saga, boasting an intelligent script, extraordinary sets and cinematography that continue the German Expressionist influence on American horror movies ? and great performances by all, especially Karloff and Lugosi. Saturday, October 23 8:20PM ?Nosferatu? Starring Max Schreck, Alexander Granach, Gustav von Wangenheim, Greta Schroeder. Directed by F.W. Murnau. (1922, 84mins., B&W). Suitable for most audiences. - - - Silent with Live Organ Accompaniment - - - By Wayne Zimmerman on the Loew?s Wonder Morton. $8 for Adults; $6 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). In our time of CGI, surround-sound and even the revival of 3-D, an 88 year old German silent film remains one of the most chilling and legendary horror movies ever made. Nosferatu was the first ? although unauthorized ? feature film version of Bram Stoker?s ?Dracula?. Stoker?s widow sued and won over copyright infringement, and all copies of Nosferatu were supposed to have been destroyed, but fortunately a few prints survived. Ironically, Nosferatu is now considered one of the best interpretations of Stoker?s Dracula ever filmed. Still, it differs from the book in several notable ways, including the names of central characters and locations. It, not the book, cemented into the Dracula canon the idea that vampires are destroyed by sunlight. And the ending differs from Stoker?s, and is one of the more suggestive mixes of innocence and evil, self-sacrifice and eroticism of the silent era. The singular performance and truly lurid makeup of Max Schreck as the vampire is one of the most iconic representations of evil ever filmed. But the greatest source of the film?s enduring power is the eerie look and truly disquieting mood that pioneering director F. W. Murnau achieved by merging German expressionist style with real location settings, daring experimentation with stop-motion and reverse-negative effects, and the use of dramatic shadows and long angles ? which became a kind of visual lexicon for horror on film. When this is combined with live organ accompaniment, as it will be at the Loew?s Jersey, Nosferatu is a truly unforgettable experience. (Film descriptions compiled from various sources.) Combo discount is available this weekend for ?Brides? and ?Son? ONLY. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings.
  20. CLASSIC MOVIE HORROR At the Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Performing Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org -- All Screenings In 35mm -- Friday, October 22 8PM ?Brides of Dracula? Starring Peter Cushing, Yvonne Monlaur, Marita Hunt, David Peel, Freda Jackson. Directed by Terence Fisher. (1960, 86mins., Color) Suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). If Universal Pictures distilled and defined the horror movie in black & white during the 1930s and ?40s, the British studio Hammer Films re-imagined and redefined the genre in color beginning in the late 1950s. Brides of Dracula was the studio?s second vampire film, the sequel to its Horror of Dracula. A young woman is stranded in a foreboding Transylvanian village and encounters a handsome young Baron, who turns out to be a vampire. In her ignorance, the young woman looses the vampire upon a girl?s school -- and herself. Fortunately, the arch nemesis of all vampires, Dr. Van Helsing, arrives to help. Brides is one of the best examples of the revised conventions Hammer established for the gothic horror genre: in addition to the glorious color cinematography ? and especially bright red blood -- there are lavish sets, impressive costumes, and an even more potent erotic undertone (though certainly nothing explicit) than Universal ever dared suggest. In this, it is a precursor to the plethora of erotically charged vampire tales that have appeared in recent years. Strong performances, good writing, action and intrigue also make the film a horror classic. Saturday, October 23 6PM ?Son of Frankenstein? Starring Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Basil Rathbone, Lionel Atwill. Directed by Rowland V. Lee. (1938, 99mins., B&W) Suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Boris Karloff as Frankenstein?s Monster is one of the most legendary performances in movie history. Karloff portrayed the Monster for the third and final time on the big screen in Son of Frankenstein. As if that wasn?t enough to make the film a classic, Karloff was joined by Bela Lugosi in what, arguably, was his finest Hollywood performance. When Dr. Frankenstein?s son, who has lived in America most of his life, returns to his ancestral home, he finds that local villagers still remember and fear his father?s creation. Goaded by a sinister man (Lugosi) living amid the ruins of his father?s castle, Frankenstein decides to revive his father?s Monster ? but to reform its brutish nature and thereby vindicate his father?s memory. Of course . . . things don?t work out as Frankenstein had planned! It would not have been surprising if this second sequel proved shop-worn, but Son of Frankenstein is a well crafted continuation of the Frankenstein saga, boasting an intelligent script, extraordinary sets and cinematography that continue the German Expressionist influence on American horror movies ? and great performances by all, especially Karloff and Lugosi. Saturday, October 23 8:20PM ?Nosferatu? Starring Max Schreck, Alexander Granach, Gustav von Wangenheim, Greta Schroeder. Directed by F.W. Murnau. (1922, 84mins., B&W). Suitable for most audiences. - - - Silent with Live Organ Accompaniment - - - By Wayne Zimmerman on the Loew?s Wonder Morton. $8 for Adults; $6 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). In our time of CGI, surround-sound and even the revival of 3-D, an 88 year old German silent film remains one of the most chilling and legendary horror movies ever made. Nosferatu was the first ? although unauthorized ? feature film version of Bram Stoker?s ?Dracula?. Stoker?s widow sued and won over copyright infringement, and all copies of Nosferatu were supposed to have been destroyed, but fortunately a few prints survived. Ironically, Nosferatu is now considered one of the best interpretations of Stoker?s Dracula ever filmed. Still, it differs from the book in several notable ways, including the names of central characters and locations. It, not the book, cemented into the Dracula canon the idea that vampires are destroyed by sunlight. And the ending differs from Stoker?s, and is one of the more suggestive mixes of innocence and evil, self-sacrifice and eroticism of the silent era. The singular performance and truly lurid makeup of Max Schreck as the vampire is one of the most iconic representations of evil ever filmed. But the greatest source of the film?s enduring power is the eerie look and truly disquieting mood that pioneering director F. W. Murnau achieved by merging German expressionist style with real location settings, daring experimentation with stop-motion and reverse-negative effects, and the use of dramatic shadows and long angles ? which became a kind of visual lexicon for horror on film. When this is combined with live organ accompaniment, as it will be at the Loew?s Jersey, Nosferatu is a truly unforgettable experience. (Film descriptions compiled from various sources.) Combo discount is available this weekend for ?Brides? and ?Son? ONLY. The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings.
  21. 3 of the Best Films Hitchcock DIDN'T Make At the Landmark Loew's Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Performing Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Fax: (201) 798-4020 Web: www.loewsjersey.org - - - All Screenings In 35mm - - - Friday, September 24 8PM "Peeping Tom" Starring Carl Boehm, Moira Shearer. Directed by Michael Powell. (1960, 106 mins., Color) Unrated, but not recommended for children. $6 for Adults, $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). This British-made film premiered within a few months of "Psycho", and the two are often compared. Indeed, "Peeping Tom", about a psychologically damaged young man driven to kill women, is every bit the dark story of madness and murder that "Psycho" is. It also shares themes of voyeurism and repressed desire with "Rear Window" and "Vertigo". But if those three films ultimately cemented Hitchcock's reputation as "The Master" of psychological thriller and horror films, "Peeping Tom" all but destroyed the career of Michael Powell, who had been one of Britain's top directors. It was denounced and banned as prurient exploitation, and all but forgotten until Martin Scorsese lauded it as groundbreaking and personally arranged for its re-release. It is both more frank and yet more subtle in its exploration of its themes than any of Hitchcock's works. And it is also a provoking meditation on the appeal of cinema, which is inherently voyeuristic. A half century later, it retains its considerable psychological impact. Don't miss this rare screening. Saturday, September 25 6PM "The Stranger" Starring Orson Welles, Edward G. Robinson, Loretta Young. Directed by Orson Welles. (1946, 95 mins., B&W) Unrated, but suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults, $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Often considered to be the most "conventional" film that Welles directed, "The Stranger" tends to be overlooked amid "Citizen Kane", "A Touch of Evil" and his other more famous titles. But this cat-and-mouse hunt to unmask a Nazi war criminal hiding in a sleepy Connecticut town still brims with Welles-ian flair, such as extraordinary use of lighting and shadow, long focus and dramatic camera angles. It's also a first rate thriller thanks to a great performance by Welles, and also by Robinson. The theme is a familiar one to Hitchcock fans: evil amid the ordinary, and the plot and at least one notable scene have something in common with Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt". Saturday, September 25 8:20PM "Charade" Starring Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn, Walter Matthau, James Coburn. Directed by Stanley Donen. (1963, 113 mins., Color) Unrated, but suitable for most audiences. $6 for Adults, $4 for Seniors (65+) and Children (12 & younger). Audrey Hepburn is an innocent woman caught in a web of intrigue and deceit when her husband is murdered and she discovers she really knew little that was true about him. As she is pursued by three men who were apparently her husband's accomplices in the theft of a large sum of money, she looks to Cary Grant for help -- but it turns out he has layers of secrets too, including multiple aliases. Soon, neither the increasingly desperate Hepburn nor the audience knows what to believe or whom to trust. Stanley Donen, better known for making musicals, borrowed some of Hitchcock's favorite plot devices to craft this stylish thriller that also mixes in romance and comedy. Includes beautiful location cinematography of early '60s Paris, and a great score by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini. (Film descriptions compiled from various sources.) - - - Combo discounts available for multiple screenings in a weekend. - - - The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings.
  22. The ?80s at the Movies At the Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace. 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax (201) 798-4020 Web www.loewsjersey.org As the Loew's Jersey continues to celebrate its 80th Anniversary Year, we present three landmark films of the the 1980s. All screenings in 35mm Friday, June 4 8PM "Raging Bull" Starring Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, Frank Vincent, Nicholas Colasanto. Directed by Martin Scorsese. 1980, 128mins., B&W and Color. Orignal Rating: R. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Saturday, June 5 at 6PM "Pee-wee?s Big Adventure" Starring Paul Reubens, Elizabeth Daily, Mark Holton, Diane Salinger. Directed by Tim Burton. 1985, 90mins, Color. Original Rating: PG. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Saturday, June 5 at 8:15PM "The Blues Brothers" Starring John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, James Brown, Ray Charles, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin, Carrie Fisher, John Candy, Henry Gibson. Directed by John Landis. 1980, 133mins., Color. Original Rating: R. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) - - - Combo discounts for multiple film screenings in a weekend are available - - - See "Film Notes" Section, Below, For More Info About Each Movie The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. FILM NOTES "Raging Bull" Martin Scorsese's brutal character study incisively portrays the rise, fall and redemption of real-life middleweight boxer Jake La Motta, a violent man in and out of the ring who seemed to thrive on his ability and willingness to take a beating. Opening with the spectacle of the over-the-hill La Motta (Robert De Niro) practicing his 1960s night-club act, the film flashes back to 1940s New York when Jake's career is on the rise. But Scorsese and De Niro avoid uplifting Rocky-like boxing movie conventions to make an unflinching portrait of an unlikable man and his ruthless profession. Their Jake is relentlessly cruel and self-destructive, a person whose inner demons cannot be exorcised even by acclaim and success. The physical brutality that makes Jake a champion in the boxing ring cripples his relationships with his wives, his business associates, and his brother. In many ways, De Niro's performance as Jake makes him seem more like an animal than a human being; and yet when he hits bottom, personally and professionally, Jake does emerge with a gleam of self-awareness. In nearly any other film, a performance as strong and intricately detailed as De Niro's would totally dominate, but here Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarty both offer superb, career-making support. Scorsese?s great visual sense is seen in how the boxing sequences are shot, choreographed, and edited with such audacious power and impact that it's hard to believe they occupy only ten minutes of screen time. The film?s visceral emotional impact is also increased by Mark Chapman?s stark black and white cinematography that imparts a tabloid realism, along with some beautifully designed tracking shots and use of slow motion that add a stylized edge. When Raging Bull opened, it under-performed at the box office as audiences and critics were initially repulsed by its protagonist. Yet the story of a lost soul struggling for a way out of the emotional damnation of his own brutal nature is so compelling, and is told with such a profound mix of unblinking horror and understated compassion that Raging Bull is now widely acclaimed as the best American film of the 1980s. "Pee-wee's Big Adventure" In the late 1970s, night club comedian Paul Reubens developed the comic persona of Pee-wee Herman, a childlike, squeaky-voiced ?host? of a kiddie show who was part Pinky Lee and part Soupy Sales. His imaginative and multi-layered skewering of the typical trappings of children?s television shows became a national sensation, earning Reubens repeated guest spots on Late Night With David Letterman and other TV shows, and even a cameo appearance (in character) in The Blues Brothers. For Pee-Wee?s own film, Reubens and comedian Phil Hartman (the two had known each other since working in an improv group years before) scripted a surrealistic reworking of the classic Italian film The Bicycle Thief. In the plot, Pee-wee is an overgrown pre-pubescent boy sporting a molded Princeton cut, blush, lipstick, and a shrunken gray flannel suit who lives an idyllic life in his bizarre home (some have compared the remarkable set design to the expressionistic The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) until someone nabs his most prized possession: a fire engine-red customized bicycle. He then embarks on an epic cross-country search to find his lost love, not to mention more than a little adventure. The script was remarkably fresh and inventive, and Ruebens? performance was pitch-perfect: playing it silly, yet managing to imbue his character with enough sensitivity to make audiences care about him while never seeming maudlin. Tim Burton made his feature length directorial debut with the film, and immediately established what would become his trademark quirky style. The film has a look reminiscent of German expressionist movies of the 1920s, filtered through a pop-art sensibility of cartoons, horror serials, and Gothic fairy tales. The result is a surreal, mystical world, yet one very close to our own ? that perfectly fits the absurdist humor. And the score by Danny Elfman is terrific. In all, Pee wee's Big Adventure is a delightful film, enjoyable for children as well as adults. "The Blues Brothers" In what can only be described as one of the most remarkable adaptations of sketch comedy characters to the Big Screen ? as improbable as it is successful -- John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd star as Jake and Elwood Blues, two white boys with black souls who the nation first glimpsed in routines on Saturday Night Live. Sporting cool shades and look-alike suits, Jake and Elwood are dispatched on a "mission from God" by their former teacher, Sister Mary Stigmata (who is something of a cross between Ingrid Bergman in The Bells of St. Mary?s and Sister Mary Ignatius from the blackly satirical play Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You). That mission is to raise $5,000 to save the orphanage they grew up in. In the course of the zany adventures that ensue, the Blues Brothers run afoul of a group of neo-Nazis, virtually kidnap former members of their old band, perform the theme from Rawhide for what may be the most unruly bar crowd in cinema history, and duck the murderous wrath of Jake?s ex-fianc?. Aside from being one of the most truly infectious slapstick comedies ever filmed ? despite their preternaturally cool personas, the brothers Blue are remarkably likable, and it is all but impossible not to laugh out loud at some of the film?s gags -- the movie is also an unapologetic homage to rhythm-and-blues in all its popular derivatives, from Cab Calloway to James Brown to Aretha Franklin, all of whom appear in lovingly realized musical scenes. And there is great fun in spotting the other members of the film?s legion of guest stars, including John Candy, Carrie Fisher, Steve Lawrence, Twiggy, Paul Reubens (aka, Pee-Wee Herman), Frank Oz and Steven Spielberg. And topping it all off, the streets, highways and police department of Chicago are laid to waste in what is, if not the most spectacular, then without doubt the funniest and coolest car chase scene ever filmed. The Blues Brothers is filled with great fun and great music from beginning to end, and is the essence of entertainment. (Film descriptions compiled and adapted from AllMovie.com and other sources.)
  23. The ?80s at the Movies At the Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace. 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel. (201) 798-6055 Fax (201) 798-4020 Web www.loewsjersey.org As the Loew's Jersey continues to celebrate its 80th Anniversary Year, we present three landmark films of the the 1980s. All screenings in 35mm Friday, June 4 8PM "Raging Bull" Starring Robert De Niro, Cathy Moriarty, Joe Pesci, Frank Vincent, Nicholas Colasanto. Directed by Martin Scorsese. 1980, 128mins., B&W and Color. Orignal Rating: R. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Saturday, June 5 at 6PM "Pee-wee?s Big Adventure" Starring Paul Reubens, Elizabeth Daily, Mark Holton, Diane Salinger. Directed by Tim Burton. 1985, 90mins, Color. Original Rating: PG. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Saturday, June 5 at 8:15PM "The Blues Brothers" Starring John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, James Brown, Ray Charles, Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklin, Carrie Fisher, John Candy, Henry Gibson. Directed by John Landis. 1980, 133mins., Color. Original Rating: R. $6 for Adults; $4 for Seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) - - - Combo discounts for multiple film screenings in a weekend are available - - - See "Film Notes" Section, Below, For More Info About Each Movie The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount off-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel -- not platter -- projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. PLUS ? Live organ entrance music (from the Loew?s magnificently restored pipe organ) before most screenings. The Loew?s Jersey is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit, multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. FILM NOTES "Raging Bull" Martin Scorsese's brutal character study incisively portrays the rise, fall and redemption of real-life middleweight boxer Jake La Motta, a violent man in and out of the ring who seemed to thrive on his ability and willingness to take a beating. Opening with the spectacle of the over-the-hill La Motta (Robert De Niro) practicing his 1960s night-club act, the film flashes back to 1940s New York when Jake's career is on the rise. But Scorsese and De Niro avoid uplifting Rocky-like boxing movie conventions to make an unflinching portrait of an unlikable man and his ruthless profession. Their Jake is relentlessly cruel and self-destructive, a person whose inner demons cannot be exorcised even by acclaim and success. The physical brutality that makes Jake a champion in the boxing ring cripples his relationships with his wives, his business associates, and his brother. In many ways, De Niro's performance as Jake makes him seem more like an animal than a human being; and yet when he hits bottom, personally and professionally, Jake does emerge with a gleam of self-awareness. In nearly any other film, a performance as strong and intricately detailed as De Niro's would totally dominate, but here Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarty both offer superb, career-making support. Scorsese?s great visual sense is seen in how the boxing sequences are shot, choreographed, and edited with such audacious power and impact that it's hard to believe they occupy only ten minutes of screen time. The film?s visceral emotional impact is also increased by Mark Chapman?s stark black and white cinematography that imparts a tabloid realism, along with some beautifully designed tracking shots and use of slow motion that add a stylized edge. When Raging Bull opened, it under-performed at the box office as audiences and critics were initially repulsed by its protagonist. Yet the story of a lost soul struggling for a way out of the emotional damnation of his own brutal nature is so compelling, and is told with such a profound mix of unblinking horror and understated compassion that Raging Bull is now widely acclaimed as the best American film of the 1980s. "Pee-wee's Big Adventure" In the late 1970s, night club comedian Paul Reubens developed the comic persona of Pee-wee Herman, a childlike, squeaky-voiced ?host? of a kiddie show who was part Pinky Lee and part Soupy Sales. His imaginative and multi-layered skewering of the typical trappings of children?s television shows became a national sensation, earning Reubens repeated guest spots on Late Night With David Letterman and other TV shows, and even a cameo appearance (in character) in The Blues Brothers. For Pee-Wee?s own film, Reubens and comedian Phil Hartman (the two had known each other since working in an improv group years before) scripted a surrealistic reworking of the classic Italian film The Bicycle Thief. In the plot, Pee-wee is an overgrown pre-pubescent boy sporting a molded Princeton cut, blush, lipstick, and a shrunken gray flannel suit who lives an idyllic life in his bizarre home (some have compared the remarkable set design to the expressionistic The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) until someone nabs his most prized possession: a fire engine-red customized bicycle. He then embarks on an epic cross-country search to find his lost love, not to mention more than a little adventure. The script was remarkably fresh and inventive, and Ruebens? performance was pitch-perfect: playing it silly, yet managing to imbue his character with enough sensitivity to make audiences care about him while never seeming maudlin. Tim Burton made his feature length directorial debut with the film, and immediately established what would become his trademark quirky style. The film has a look reminiscent of German expressionist movies of the 1920s, filtered through a pop-art sensibility of cartoons, horror serials, and Gothic fairy tales. The result is a surreal, mystical world, yet one very close to our own ? that perfectly fits the absurdist humor. And the score by Danny Elfman is terrific. In all, Pee wee's Big Adventure is a delightful film, enjoyable for children as well as adults. "The Blues Brothers" In what can only be described as one of the most remarkable adaptations of sketch comedy characters to the Big Screen ? as improbable as it is successful -- John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd star as Jake and Elwood Blues, two white boys with black souls who the nation first glimpsed in routines on Saturday Night Live. Sporting cool shades and look-alike suits, Jake and Elwood are dispatched on a "mission from God" by their former teacher, Sister Mary Stigmata (who is something of a cross between Ingrid Bergman in The Bells of St. Mary?s and Sister Mary Ignatius from the blackly satirical play Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All For You). That mission is to raise $5,000 to save the orphanage they grew up in. In the course of the zany adventures that ensue, the Blues Brothers run afoul of a group of neo-Nazis, virtually kidnap former members of their old band, perform the theme from Rawhide for what may be the most unruly bar crowd in cinema history, and duck the murderous wrath of Jake?s ex-fianc?. Aside from being one of the most truly infectious slapstick comedies ever filmed ? despite their preternaturally cool personas, the brothers Blue are remarkably likable, and it is all but impossible not to laugh out loud at some of the film?s gags -- the movie is also an unapologetic homage to rhythm-and-blues in all its popular derivatives, from Cab Calloway to James Brown to Aretha Franklin, all of whom appear in lovingly realized musical scenes. And there is great fun in spotting the other members of the film?s legion of guest stars, including John Candy, Carrie Fisher, Steve Lawrence, Twiggy, Paul Reubens (aka, Pee-Wee Herman), Frank Oz and Steven Spielberg. And topping it all off, the streets, highways and police department of Chicago are laid to waste in what is, if not the most spectacular, then without doubt the funniest and coolest car chase scene ever filmed. The Blues Brothers is filled with great fun and great music from beginning to end, and is the essence of entertainment. (Film descriptions compiled and adapted from AllMovie.com and other sources.)
  24. The '70s On The Big Screen At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Web: www.loewsjersey.org As the Loew's Jersey continues to celebrate its 80th Anniversary Year, we present three landmark films of 1970s. All in 35mm Friday, May 21 8PM "Taxi Driver" Starring Robert De Niro, Cybill Shepherd, Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, Albert Brooks, Harvey Keitel. Directed by Martin Scorsese. Score by Bernard Herrmann. (1976, 113mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) "I'm God's lonely man," says Travis Bickle, played by Robert De Niro in one of his finest and most memorable performances. He?s an insomniac, ex-Marine and chronic loner who, even when he tries, can?t seem to relate to the world around him. He drives a cab at night in the decaying New York City of the mid-1970s, which director Martin Scorsese and screenwriter Paul Schrader depict as a grimly stylized hell on Earth, where noise, filth, directionless rage, and dirty sex (both morally and literally) surround him at all turns. Lost in this toxic milieu, chronically isolated and potentially volatile, Bickle is a bomb waiting to explode, like the proverbial gun which, when produced in the first act, must go off in the third. After an encounter with a malevolent fare (played by Scorsese), the increasingly paranoid Bickle begins to condition (and arm) himself for his imagined destiny, a mission that mutates from assassinating a Presidential candidate to violently "saving" a teenage hooker (played by Jodie Foster) from her pimp. De Niro's masterful performance brings Travis vividly to life; Scorsese's dynamic, idiosyncratic visual storytelling (given an invaluable assist by cinematographer Michael Chapman) provides the perfect narrative context; and Bernard Herrmann's eerie final score (finished the day he died) provides perfect punctuation. The work is a timeless, noir-ishly dystopian rumination on the mythology of American heroism that emphasizes the myth?s sometimes obsessively violent underpinnings. But Taxi Driver is also very much a distillation of the fears and fixations of its time. Released in the Bicentennial year, after the socially turbulent years of the late 1960s and early ?70s, Vietnam, Watergate, and attention-getting attempts on President Gerald Ford's life, Taxi Driver's intense portrait of a man and a society unhinged spoke resonantly to audiences of its era. It remains a striking milestone of both Scorsese's career and 1970s Hollywood. Saturday, May 22 6:15PM "Blazing Saddles" Starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Mel Brooks. Written & Directed by Mel Brooks. (1974, 93mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Blazing Saddles is vulgar, crude and sometimes scandalous ? and is one of the funniest and most successful film spoofs of all time. It is also writer-director Mel Brooks at his ribald best, with further outrageous hilarity added in by co-writer Richard Pryor. Cleavon Little plays the first African-American sheriff of a stunned Western town scheduled for demolition by an encroaching railroad. If that plot sounds, at least in part, like a throw-back to the movies of an earlier time, it?s because Brooks was, in his own manic, Borscht Belt way, a central figure in revising classic film genres to reflect 1970s values and attitudes ? an effort more often associated with such directors as Robert Altman and Peter Bogdanovich. Blazing Saddles is a work that truly could have only been made in the ?70s ? the idiom of the classic American western hijacked into an over-the-top comedy that purposely and relentlessly shredded the popular conception of ?good taste? while making merciless fun of EVERYONE, regardless of skin color or religious persuasion. If blacks came off as stereotypical, whites were shown as just plain stupid and ignorant. The result was one of the funniest films of all time ? which, ironically, could probably not be made today in our more politically correct, up-tight time. Beyond its over-the-top humor, Blazing Saddles boasts some great performances: Little and Gene Wilder have great chemistry; Madeline Kahn is wonderful as a chanteuse modeled on Marlene Dietrich; and Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman and even Brooks himself turn in great supporting roles. Saturday, May 22 8:40PM "Saturday Night Fever" Starring John Travolta, Karen Gorney, Barry Miller, Joseph Cali, Paul Pope. (1977, 119mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) From the moment John Travolta sauntered down a Brooklyn street to the Bee Gees? "Stayin' Alive" at the beginning of Saturday Night Fever, music, movies and all of pop culture were irrevocably changed, and the 1970s gained what is perhaps the decade's single most recognizable celluloid imagery. Travolta plays Tony Manero, a Brooklyn paint-store clerk who?s trapped in a dead-end existence ? except at night on the disco dance floor, where, when he struts his stuff amidst flashing lights and sweaty, undulating bodies, he?s a king. Part of the film?s success owes to how astutely it balanced a gritty sense of 1970s economic and social malaise with galvanizing dance numbers. But of course, the hallmark of the film is Travolata?s star-making performance ? especially the scenes in his iconic white suite ? and the Bee Gees? soundtrack. During the first half of 1978, the movie's disco songs saturated the singles charts, occupying up to four positions at a time, prompting more and more people to see the movie -- just as, in turn, the movie's vast popularity prompted more and more record sales. This powerful marketing synergy between movie and music set a new standard, with the film eventually grossing over $100 million and the soundtrack becoming one of the best selling albums of all time. For many young people at the time, the film marked their generation's coming of age and was an indelible move-going experience. By any measure, Saturday Night Fever is the definitive evocation of the Disco Era, an affirmation of Disco's dominance (however brief) of the pop culture scene. (Film descriptions compiled from AllMovie.com and other sources.) - - - Combo discounts for multiple film screenings are available. - - - The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount of-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel, not platter, projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. The Loew?s is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit. Multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc.
  25. The '70s On The Big Screen At The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre A Not-For-Profit Arts Center in a Historic Movie Palace 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ 07306 Tel: (201) 798-6055 Web: www.loewsjersey.org As the Loew's Jersey continues to celebrate its 80th Anniversary Year, we present three landmark films of 1970s. All in 35mm Friday, May 21 8PM "Taxi Driver" Starring Robert De Niro, Cybill Shepherd, Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, Albert Brooks, Harvey Keitel. Directed by Martin Scorsese. Score by Bernard Herrmann. (1976, 113mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) "I'm God's lonely man," says Travis Bickle, played by Robert De Niro in one of his finest and most memorable performances. He?s an insomniac, ex-Marine and chronic loner who, even when he tries, can?t seem to relate to the world around him. He drives a cab at night in the decaying New York City of the mid-1970s, which director Martin Scorsese and screenwriter Paul Schrader depict as a grimly stylized hell on Earth, where noise, filth, directionless rage, and dirty sex (both morally and literally) surround him at all turns. Lost in this toxic milieu, chronically isolated and potentially volatile, Bickle is a bomb waiting to explode, like the proverbial gun which, when produced in the first act, must go off in the third. After an encounter with a malevolent fare (played by Scorsese), the increasingly paranoid Bickle begins to condition (and arm) himself for his imagined destiny, a mission that mutates from assassinating a Presidential candidate to violently "saving" a teenage hooker (played by Jodie Foster) from her pimp. De Niro's masterful performance brings Travis vividly to life; Scorsese's dynamic, idiosyncratic visual storytelling (given an invaluable assist by cinematographer Michael Chapman) provides the perfect narrative context; and Bernard Herrmann's eerie final score (finished the day he died) provides perfect punctuation. The work is a timeless, noir-ishly dystopian rumination on the mythology of American heroism that emphasizes the myth?s sometimes obsessively violent underpinnings. But Taxi Driver is also very much a distillation of the fears and fixations of its time. Released in the Bicentennial year, after the socially turbulent years of the late 1960s and early ?70s, Vietnam, Watergate, and attention-getting attempts on President Gerald Ford's life, Taxi Driver's intense portrait of a man and a society unhinged spoke resonantly to audiences of its era. It remains a striking milestone of both Scorsese's career and 1970s Hollywood. Saturday, May 22 6:15PM "Blazing Saddles" Starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Mel Brooks. Written & Directed by Mel Brooks. (1974, 93mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) Blazing Saddles is vulgar, crude and sometimes scandalous ? and is one of the funniest and most successful film spoofs of all time. It is also writer-director Mel Brooks at his ribald best, with further outrageous hilarity added in by co-writer Richard Pryor. Cleavon Little plays the first African-American sheriff of a stunned Western town scheduled for demolition by an encroaching railroad. If that plot sounds, at least in part, like a throw-back to the movies of an earlier time, it?s because Brooks was, in his own manic, Borscht Belt way, a central figure in revising classic film genres to reflect 1970s values and attitudes ? an effort more often associated with such directors as Robert Altman and Peter Bogdanovich. Blazing Saddles is a work that truly could have only been made in the ?70s ? the idiom of the classic American western hijacked into an over-the-top comedy that purposely and relentlessly shredded the popular conception of ?good taste? while making merciless fun of EVERYONE, regardless of skin color or religious persuasion. If blacks came off as stereotypical, whites were shown as just plain stupid and ignorant. The result was one of the funniest films of all time ? which, ironically, could probably not be made today in our more politically correct, up-tight time. Beyond its over-the-top humor, Blazing Saddles boasts some great performances: Little and Gene Wilder have great chemistry; Madeline Kahn is wonderful as a chanteuse modeled on Marlene Dietrich; and Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman and even Brooks himself turn in great supporting roles. Saturday, May 22 8:40PM "Saturday Night Fever" Starring John Travolta, Karen Gorney, Barry Miller, Joseph Cali, Paul Pope. (1977, 119mins, Color) $6 for adults; $4 for seniors (65+) and children (12 & younger) From the moment John Travolta sauntered down a Brooklyn street to the Bee Gees? "Stayin' Alive" at the beginning of Saturday Night Fever, music, movies and all of pop culture were irrevocably changed, and the 1970s gained what is perhaps the decade's single most recognizable celluloid imagery. Travolta plays Tony Manero, a Brooklyn paint-store clerk who?s trapped in a dead-end existence ? except at night on the disco dance floor, where, when he struts his stuff amidst flashing lights and sweaty, undulating bodies, he?s a king. Part of the film?s success owes to how astutely it balanced a gritty sense of 1970s economic and social malaise with galvanizing dance numbers. But of course, the hallmark of the film is Travolata?s star-making performance ? especially the scenes in his iconic white suite ? and the Bee Gees? soundtrack. During the first half of 1978, the movie's disco songs saturated the singles charts, occupying up to four positions at a time, prompting more and more people to see the movie -- just as, in turn, the movie's vast popularity prompted more and more record sales. This powerful marketing synergy between movie and music set a new standard, with the film eventually grossing over $100 million and the soundtrack becoming one of the best selling albums of all time. For many young people at the time, the film marked their generation's coming of age and was an indelible move-going experience. By any measure, Saturday Night Fever is the definitive evocation of the Disco Era, an affirmation of Disco's dominance (however brief) of the pop culture scene. (Film descriptions compiled from AllMovie.com and other sources.) - - - Combo discounts for multiple film screenings are available. - - - The Loew's Is Easy To Get To: The Loew's Jersey Theatre, at 54 Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ, is directly across JFK Boulevard from the JSQ PATH Center with trains to and from Lower and Midtown Manhattan and Newark's Penn Station, and is minutes from the NJ Turnpike, Rts 3 and 1&9 and the Holland & Lincoln Tunnels. We're easy to reach by car or mass transit from throughout the Metro Region. Discount of-street parking is available in Square Ramp Garage adjoining the Loew's at the foot of Magnolia Avenue off of Tonnele Avenue, behind the Loew's. Patrons must validate their parking ticket before leaving the Theatre. What?s Special About Seeing A Movie At The Loew?s? The Landmark Loew?s Jersey Theatre is one of America?s grandest surviving Movie Palaces. We show movies the way they were meant to be seen: in a grandly ornate setting ? on our BIG 50 ft wide screen! The Loew?s runs reel-to-reel, not platter, projection, which often allows us to screen an archival or studio vault print that is the best available copy of a movie title. The Loew?s is managed by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc. as a non-profit. Multi-discipline performing arts center. Classic Film Weekends are presented by Friends of the Loew?s, Inc.

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