ccbaxter

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Everything posted by ccbaxter

  1. ccbaxter

    "EAST OF EDEN" (1955) a TCM premiere - 2/23

    > {quote:title=scsu1975 wrote:}{quote} > > {quote:title=texanna wrote:}{quote} > > > {quote:title=skimpole wrote:}{quote} > > > As it happens, Canadians don't get to see "East of Eden." > > > > what did they show in canada instead? > > Slapshot. Or perhaps North of Eden?
  2. ccbaxter

    "EAST OF EDEN" (1955) a TCM premiere - 2/23

    I haven't seen it yet and look forward to watching. I became a fan of Julie Harris after seeing her in The Haunting. And I tend to dig Kazan's work.
  3. ccbaxter

    [b]Announcing The 2008 TCM Message Board Awards![/b]

    Just checking in. Have the results been announced?
  4. ccbaxter

    Sound quality

    Hmmm... maybe by it being mentioned here it might alert someone.
  5. ccbaxter

    Sound quality

    Enchanted April, seemed low in volume... but as I'm writing this it seems to have improved! TCM often seems to have volume problems for me. Sometimes RO's intros are way too low. Sometimes it's the movies that are way too low. At first I suspected my cable provider, but when the volume change happens between intro and movie, or between one movie and another, it leads me to agree with Fred's explanation. I don't mind adjusting my volume control, but when the volume gets too low, the signal to noise gets out of hand. I'm willing to say that TCM would benefit from better audio consistency. Message was edited by: ccbaxter
  6. ccbaxter

    Li'l Abner aspect ratio?

    Thanks here too.
  7. ccbaxter

    Li'l Abner aspect ratio?

    > {quote:title=ChelseaRialtoStudios wrote:}{quote} > ...They really needed jugs, fuzz guitars and banjos. Agreed!
  8. ccbaxter

    Li'l Abner aspect ratio?

    I was seeing the same thing and wondered about that. I'll make a guess. I've heard that some films are shot with a 4:3 ratio and then vertically cropped for theatrical showing. Apparently, the transfer we are now seeing was mistakenly squeezed to letterbox instead of being cropped to letterbox. That would explain why everyone is squished. And sometimes the wide shots reveal lights and the top edges of the sets. That stuff was probably not intended to be in the shot, but the DP knew it would be excluded when cropped. Again, this is just my guess. And I should add, it's a shame because the art direction is pretty nifty! Some of these dance numbers are really fun too.
  9. ccbaxter

    Guity Pleasures

    Wow, that Batman serial sounds like a great choice for a TCM Saturday morning matinee!
  10. ccbaxter

    Jacques Tati

    "This is what interests Tati. Everything and nothing. Blades of grass, a kite, children, a little old man, anything, everything which is at once real, bizarre, and charming." - Jean-Luc Godard "He sees things in the street, in life, that others don?t have time to see. Tati has time to see people as individuals." - Maria Kimberly, actress from Jacques Tati's Trafic "It was the moment when I realized that comedy could be both funny and beautiful." - Terry Jones on seeing Mr. Hulot's Holiday My first experience watching a Tati film was a good number of years ago when a friend loaned a copy of Playtime. Here was a film made almost entirely with wide shots, scarcely any dialogue, and no plot in sight. Its radical departure from traditional storytelling made it difficult to follow, and yet the scenes were utterly fascinating. I've heard it said that watching Playtime is like people watching at the park; I think that sums it up greatly. There are so many little things going on, so many tiny exchanges through carefully coordinated moments, that one's natural curiosity is roused. Yet, it's Tati's own onscreen persona, the bumbling but well-meaning Mr. Hulot, that keeps Playtime from being but a string of clever gags. Hulot isn't just hilarious, he's so affable and endearing that we dearly hope he can befriend the young woman he's met. This for a character who seldom speaks and is seen in nary a single close up. If it took a bit for me to connect with that first viewing of Playtime, I would ultimately find it one of my favorite films. When I finally saw it in 70mm on the big screen, it was one of the most joyful theater experiences I've had. I recently discovered that I wasn't the only one who found Playtime an acquired taste. In his film review, Roger Ebert says, "Playtime is a peculiar, mysterious, magical film. Perhaps you should see it as a preparation for seeing it; the first time won't quite work." This October 9th, TCM will be showing an evening of films by Jacques Tati to celebrate his 101st birthday. In Jour de fete (1949), Tati plays an inept rural postman aspiring to modernize postal delivery. Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953), Mon Oncle (1958), and Playtime (1967), follow the winding, winsome travels of Mr. Hulot. These last three are a real treat to view in this succession; you'll follow Hulot's journey from a charming seaside hotel, through "modernized" suburbia, and finally to an urban landscape of glass walls and brushed aluminum. Don't let my focus on Playtime lead you to think the other films are any less fun. I find the three Hulot films to exceed each other, each in their own way. A fourth Hulot film, Trafic (1971), is not being shown but was just released on DVD by Criterion. This is considered a lesser work of Tati's, although I enjoy it despite its unevenness. The DVD also has a good documentary on Tati by his daughter, Sophie Tatischeff. Thanks to Criterion, all four Mr. Hulot films are now available. Enough of my rambling; here are some pictures: Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953) Mumbling Jacques Tati checks into a seaside hotel. The lovely Martine (Natalie Pascaud) arrives. Obsession over drooping taffy. Probably not what the man in shorts expected on his holiday. The hotel staff have come to expect these things.
  11. ccbaxter

    Guity Pleasures

    > {quote:title=Film_Fatale wrote:}{quote} > ccbaxter, > That movie definitely looks like it would fit in nicely in the TCM Underground! B-) Great idea! TCMProgrammer take note!
  12. ccbaxter

    Guity Pleasures

    I recently purchased the DVD of Ren? Cardona?s Santa Claus (1959), thanks to this [Movie Morlocks blog|http://moviemorlocks.com/2008/12/16/one-helluva-christmas/]. It's undoubtedly the looniest movie I've seen in a long, long time. A big-eared devil tries to stop a creepy looking Santa Claus from delivering toys. Merlin the Magician comes to Santa's rescue. Santa lives in a cloud castle and listens to what the children of the world are saying thanks to a big set of rubber lips mounted on a computer. And it gets weirder. Originally intended for kids, it's probably more likely to give them nightmares. But for fans of the ultra goofy, it's a Christmas 'disasterpiece'! Santa teaches 'Pitch' the devil a lesson in holiday etiquette
  13. ccbaxter

    Nice Spots

    "I just want to tell you all how happy I am to be back in the studio, making a picture again." And TCM does it again with a great new [31-Days of Oscar promo|http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index.jsp?cid=219831]. My favorite moment is Audrey Hepburn's exit. How cool! I also like the New York vs. L.A. spot. It moves fast and is really funny. Wish I had a link to offer. But I don't.
  14. ccbaxter

    New Essentials host?

    Hi Kim. The new co-host will be Alec Baldwin. CelluliodKid started a thread about it [here|http://forums.tcm.com/jive/tcm/thread.jspa?threadID=136647&start=15&tstart=0]. I like Baldwin and loved how he conducted his interview with Gene Wilder, so I look forward to seeing what he'll do with the opportunity.
  15. ccbaxter

    Nice Spots

    Miss Goddess and CBLover, I'm glad I'm not the only one who liked that spot. I'm a bit surprised we're the only ones commenting on it, as it's a real eye catcher. CBLover, I love that Lemmon tribute too. Spacey reveals some warm and funny moments in their friendship. It cracks me up when he does Lemmon, "That's a touch of terrific kid. You ought to do this professionally." [Kevin Spacey on Jack Lemmon |http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/index.jsp?cid=220703]
  16. ccbaxter

    Nice Spots

    FF, those are interesting. That last one is surreal.
  17. ccbaxter

    Jacques Tati

    > {quote:title=ILoveRayMilland wrote:}{quote} > It was this little old Subaru or something. Driving it was Jacques Tati! Well, an exact duplicate! He sat slightly hunched over, with a rather whimsical expression on his face. And he had a hat just like Tati in *"M. Hulot's Holiday"* ! All that was missing was the pipe... That was me. I gave up pipe smoking, but I won't give up my sputtering Subaru. If I would have known it was you, I would have waved.
  18. ccbaxter

    Nice Spots

    > {quote:title=casablancalover wrote:}{quote} > ...What makes them so interesting, cc? The New York vs. LA spot is a briskly animated collage of postcard-like pieces that slide in, out, and over each other. The narration is funny in how it contrasts the visuals. I pray your LA accommodations were a lot better than the ones featured in this spot.
  19. ccbaxter

    Lubitsch's "Cluny Brown" (1946) a TCM Premiere

    Thanks. I guess that's the way it crumbles, cookie-wise.
  20. ccbaxter

    Lubitsch's "Cluny Brown" (1946) a TCM Premiere

    Rats, I missed it! Why do I always miss the ones that aren't scheduled to be replayed?
  21. ccbaxter

    TCM Remembers 2008/Deaths of 2008

    Great observations Kyle. I had only caught a few of those. Another nice moment is the shot of a lone bird directly after John Phillip Law in angel wings.
  22. ccbaxter

    The Cinnamon Bear

    Between TCM's fine holiday line up, you might want to treat yourself to The Cinnamon Bear, a charming and nostalgic radio series that first aired in 1937 between Thanksgiving and Christmas. The radio show proved to be so popular that it is said to be broadcast by a station somewhere in the world every year during the holidays, even today ([Wikipedia|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cinnamon_Bear]). You can listen to the episodes free: [The Cinnamon Bear|http://www.getrichslowly.org/blog/2007/11/29/the-cinnamon-bear-an-annual-holiday-tradition/]. Goes great with hot cocoa.
  23. ccbaxter

    [b]Announcing The 2008 TCM Message Board Awards![/b]

    There's an easy enough way to find out. I sure do love that Erol Flinn.
  24. ccbaxter

    [b]Announcing The 2008 TCM Message Board Awards![/b]

    This looks like fun. I'll wait until I see the Ron Howard doc before I vote.
  25. ccbaxter

    TCM Remembers 2008/Deaths of 2008

    They recently did an edit to the piece to include Van Johnson. Nice.

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