DougieB

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About DougieB

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  1. DougieB

    Movie Muscle

    To quote Noble Lord What's-His-Name: "I've always looked forward to the day I'd have you here at my feet."
  2. DougieB

    Romance Films on TCM

    I LOVE Serenade, the way it twists the usual male/female dynamic and has the woman as the heartless user and the man as the long-suffering victim. It uses the conventions of the traditional "woman's" picture to tell the story of a male character. It reminds me of Sincerely Yours, the Liberace epic where there was a man as the center of focus, going through all the ritual tribulations which would normally befall a female lead. In that movie, because of Liberace's personal squishiness on the male/female spectrum, there's a kind on unstated gay aura to the whole enterprise, but I don't get that same feeling from Mario Lanza's performance. He remains masculine, the same way Joan Fontaine remains feminine despite her calculated iciness, making the role reversal all the more dramatic and intriguing. And, as stated, the music is great.
  3. DougieB

    Movie Muscle

    And the music sounded like the stuff the guy from DEVO (Mark Mothersbaugh) composed for Pee-Wee's Playhouse, which made the big phallic bellows thing all the more whimsical.
  4. DougieB

    Movie Muscle

    Flawless....beautiful skin and body, like sculpted marble. I've really got to track this one down because it looks so fun. Did anyone else catch a distinct Barbarella vibe in the set design and the music? (The girl imprisoned in the rock specifically, but also the just-believable-enough-but-still-tacky monster.) I wonder if any of the same people worked on both films, since both were done in Europe. Anyway, Bravo, Mr. Park.
  5. DougieB

    It's movie heaven, 1961 style : SUSAN SLADE

    I'm a big fan of Delmer Daves in general, but I have to say his movies often veered awfully close to bad-movies-we-love territory I agree with Princess that A Summer Place is the pick of the litter, but I too have a soft spot for Susan Slade. A number of years back John Waters released a coffee table book called "Director's Cut", made up of Polaroid screen shots taken from TV and VHS video releases. He broke down segments into individual shots in some cases, like the landscape shots in the title sequence of Peyton Place and the jigsaw puzzle of Carroll Baker's face in Sylvia, all stuff only a movie nut would appreciate. (My favorite was called "Dorothy Malone's Collar", showing a bunch of examples of Dorothy's famous upturned collar from different films. Also "Lana Turner From The Back", which was just that, shots of her from behind.) He did four pages of shots from Susan Slade, including a shot of the ridiculously obvious burning plastic baby doll substituting for Susan's kid, as well as beautiful gauzy images of Connie, Troy and Grant Williams, the elusive father of her child. Movie heaven indeed, papyrubeetle.
  6. DougieB

    Gordon Scott

    He had a great smile. I don't remember many of the other Tarzans being all that smiley, but Gordon had a mega-watt smile he wasn't afraid to use. Beautiful guy.
  7. DougieB

    Movie Muscle

    Kirk Morris is one of my faves. He'd be an exceptionally handsome guy even without the muscles, which can't be said of all the peplum guys. 'Dorable.
  8. DougieB

    Gordon Scott

    We should all have friends like that.
  9. DougieB

    Movie Muscle

    Muscle Beach?
  10. I just posted recently about Barry Humphries, who played the wife of theater "impresario" Nathan Lane in the most recent adaptation of Nicholas Nicholby.
  11. DougieB

    "Rodan" (1958)

    It seems like they went out of the way from the beginning to "humanize" Mothra with the two little fairy guides, so that you always rooted for him (her?) At one point they went way off-course with Godzilla and made him so kid-friendly that he was practically a house pet, but thankfully that didn't last long. You're right about the agonizing in the original about having to use the discovery on such a huge scale. The Japanese in particular would have been very sensitive to the idea of harnessing and unleashing things in nature. Seeing Godzilla reduced to a skeleton was pretty brutal and extreme; it seemed like a regrettable end, even for a monster.
  12. DougieB

    No Words

    It looks like some kind of in-house Navy thing, maybe for use within the military but not necessarily for the public. All the gaping holes in the fronts of the men's shorts (not that I objected in the least) and the sight of some men sitting on the commode would indicate it wasn't for public consumption. Or maybe it was the private stash of someone high up on the chain of command?
  13. DougieB

    THE WINSLOW BOY (1948)

    I also liked the 1999 version directed by David Mamet from his script based on Rattigan's play. Nigel Hawthorne and Gemma Jones played the parents and Jeremy Northam played the lawyer. PBS once showed a production of the play, but I don't remember details. You're right that it's a really good look at a particular era and it's always fascinating seeing justice being served against the odds.
  14. DougieB

    Gay Theme Biofilms

    Maybe he's just shy.
  15. DougieB

    Rock and Roll Extravaganzas

    There have been some really good fictionalized rock movies over the years too. American Hot Wax (1978) was a somewhat fictionalized movie about Alan Freed and his stage shows, featuring the real Chuck Berry mixed in with some made-up-but-spot-on groups and singers. My favorite is Grace of My Heart (1996) with Illeana Douglas as a Carole King/Ellie Greenwich mash-up who finds success in the Brill Building era by placing her songs with other singers. Eric Stoltz plays her songwriting partner/hubby; John Turturro plays a Phil Spector-like producer; Brigit Fonda plays a Leslie Gore-type singer with a secret, and Matt Dillon plays a Brian Wilson-type surf music legend. There's some great original music, including the monumental "God Give Me Strength". The groups and singers are all amalgams of actual vintage artists and the music has a totally period feel. The movie covers a lot of ground time-wise in terms of the evolution of the music and a lot of genres are covered.

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