HollywoodGolightly

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  1. HollywoodGolightly

    Clint Eastwood - from bit roles to Oscar-winning director

    I loved the Mercer tribute - hope to watch it again soon.
  2. HollywoodGolightly

    Clint Eastwood - from bit roles to Oscar-winning director

    There's an early review of The Eastwood Factor on variety.com - but avoid reading it if you don't want any possible spoilers. *The Eastwood Factor* (Docu -- Turner Classic Movies, Mon. May 31, 10:30 p.m.) Produced by Lorac Prods. Producer-director-writer, Richard Schickel; co-producer, Doug Freeman; editor, Faith Ginsberg. Running time: 88 MIN. Narrator: Morgan Freeman. By BRIAN LOWRY Despite the fascinating arc of Clint Eastwood's work as an actor and director, Richard Schickel's ode to that impressive filmography -- premiering on Turner Classic Movies in advance of a compilation DVD release -- never cuts much beneath the grizzled surface. Part of that has to do with Eastwood himself, who is clearly less comfortable expounding on his movies than making them, unlike the critic-documentarian's previous retrospectives with Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese. Notably, those bore the "Spielberg on Spielberg" title, whereas "The Eastwood Factor" -- an equation that still remains mysterious after 88 pleasant minutes -- seems aptly named. Schickel -- who also assembled "You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story" -- touches on Eastwood's long relationship with the studio, a marriage dating back to Frank Wells and "The Outlaw Jose Wales" in the mid-1970s. But he doesn't fully develop that thread. Although his second career as a director began 40 years ago with "Play Misty for Me" (and 1988's "Bird" earned critical plaudits), Schickel rightly notes that the Eastwood of the '70s and '80s was defined by the "Dirty Harry" sequels, which made his qualitative leap in the early '90s -- beginning with "Unforgiven," "Clint's first fully acknowledged masterpiece" -- all the more remarkable. Narrated by Morgan Freeman (and one can never go wrong with that decision), the project offers generous clips from the movies that followed -- "Million Dollar Baby," "Mystic River," "Letters From Iwo Jima," "Gran Torino," "Invictus" -- but would have benefited, given Eastwood's taciturn nature, from bringing other voices into the discussion. The most personal section comes at the end, when Eastwood is shown in Carmel, playing golf and enjoying the idyllic setting of a place where, as he acknowledges, he can blend in, without being shackled by movie-star trappings. The latest cinematic chapters for Eastwood have been artful ones, elevating him to the ranks of directors who rightfully merit such a tribute. Yet while "The Eastwood Factor" serves as a carefully guided tour through the Warner Bros. portion of a storied resume, it won't make anyone's day.
  3. HollywoodGolightly

    Clint Eastwood - from bit roles to Oscar-winning director

    There's an early review of The Eastwood Factor on variety.com - but avoid reading it if you don't want any possible spoilers. *The Eastwood Factor* (Docu -- Turner Classic Movies, Mon. May 31, 10:30 p.m.) Produced by Lorac Prods. Producer-director-writer, Richard Schickel; co-producer, Doug Freeman; editor, Faith Ginsberg. Running time: 88 MIN. Narrator: Morgan Freeman. By BRIAN LOWRY Despite the fascinating arc of Clint Eastwood's work as an actor and director, Richard Schickel's ode to that impressive filmography -- premiering on Turner Classic Movies in advance of a compilation DVD release -- never cuts much beneath the grizzled surface. Part of that has to do with Eastwood himself, who is clearly less comfortable expounding on his movies than making them, unlike the critic-documentarian's previous retrospectives with Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese. Notably, those bore the "Spielberg on Spielberg" title, whereas "The Eastwood Factor" -- an equation that still remains mysterious after 88 pleasant minutes -- seems aptly named. Schickel -- who also assembled "You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story" -- touches on Eastwood's long relationship with the studio, a marriage dating back to Frank Wells and "The Outlaw Jose Wales" in the mid-1970s. But he doesn't fully develop that thread. Although his second career as a director began 40 years ago with "Play Misty for Me" (and 1988's "Bird" earned critical plaudits), Schickel rightly notes that the Eastwood of the '70s and '80s was defined by the "Dirty Harry" sequels, which made his qualitative leap in the early '90s -- beginning with "Unforgiven," "Clint's first fully acknowledged masterpiece" -- all the more remarkable. Narrated by Morgan Freeman (and one can never go wrong with that decision), the project offers generous clips from the movies that followed -- "Million Dollar Baby," "Mystic River," "Letters From Iwo Jima," "Gran Torino," "Invictus" -- but would have benefited, given Eastwood's taciturn nature, from bringing other voices into the discussion. The most personal section comes at the end, when Eastwood is shown in Carmel, playing golf and enjoying the idyllic setting of a place where, as he acknowledges, he can blend in, without being shackled by movie-star trappings. The latest cinematic chapters for Eastwood have been artful ones, elevating him to the ranks of directors who rightfully merit such a tribute. Yet while "The Eastwood Factor" serves as a carefully guided tour through the Warner Bros. portion of a storied resume, it won't make anyone's day.
  4. HollywoodGolightly

    The best time-travel movies of all time

    Thanks for the heads-up, SansFin. Now I just have to check if I get BBC America (but probably do).
  5. HollywoodGolightly

    Name a Celebrity - Name a Movie

    Jane Greer was in They Won't Believe Me with Robert Young
  6. HollywoodGolightly

    Actor/Movie Association Game

    Love Thy Neighbor
  7. HollywoodGolightly

    Name a Celebrity - Name a Movie

    James Gleason was in The Night of the Hunter with Robert Mitchum
  8. HollywoodGolightly

    Actor/Movie Association Game

    We're Not Married!
  9. HollywoodGolightly

    Name a Celebrity - Name a Movie

    Peter Falk was in Robin and the Seven Hoods with Frank Sinatra
  10. HollywoodGolightly

    Actor/Movie Association Game

    Cover Girl
  11. HollywoodGolightly

    *A to Z of Movies*

    Fearmakers (The)
  12. HollywoodGolightly

    Actor/Movie Association Game

    Thousands Cheer
  13. HollywoodGolightly

    *A to Z of Movies*

    Dark Victory
  14. HollywoodGolightly

    *A to Z of actresses and actors*:)

    Ford, Glenn
  15. HollywoodGolightly

    For sale: eternity with Marilyn Monroe

    I doubt a lower minimum bid would have much effect, what they need to do is have pre-approved bidders only so that nobody backs out after the auction is over.

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