StephanieBlue

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  1. StephanieBlue

    Great Idea for a new TCM program.

    About 10-15 years ago (and I'm sure I'll be corrected if I'm incorrect), AMC did a piece where they interviewed several centenarians regarding their experiences going to the movies in the'20s and '30s. It was very touching and heart warming to watch these individuals recollect their favorite stars growing up--such as William S. Hart, Douglas Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin. One of the ladies still had a cute little giggle as she recalled a Charlie Chaplin film. I am so completely disheartened with the critical comments made about Osborne. Who would have the heart to bash a little ol' lady remembering what it was like to go to the movies in the 1930s as a child? She wouldn't be a film critic or a film historian so people couldn't dissect her comments for inaccuracies. No need to comment on how unfeasible or impracticable the idea would be as I don't find the discussion threads enjoyable anymore. Too much bickering and negativity.
  2. StephanieBlue

    IS ANYONE GONNA' GO TO "TRUE GRIT?"

    Wow! Did I hit a nerve? Are you Jeff Bridges relative or something? Calm down there! Alright, Bridges has guts!!!! Alright, Coen Brothers wanted to do a remake!!!!!!!!!! You cannot tell me that I would be the only person who would go see the movie and compare Bridge's portrayal to Wayne's.
  3. StephanieBlue

    "THE KING'S SPEECH" SET TO DOMINATE OSCARS!

    First of all, I hope Colin Firth wins Best Actor since he lost out to the typically awarded "alcoholic" character role last year (Jeff Bridges in Crazy Heart). Plus remember, 2011 is a Royal wedding year.
  4. StephanieBlue

    Who should be star of the month in February?

    How about someone different than the usual top 30 stars of all time? Lionel Barrymore, Walter Brennan, Kay Francis, Charles Laughton, Herbert Marshall, Basil Rathbone, Charles Ruggles, Rosalind Russell, Donald Crisp, Glenda Farrell, James Gleason, Susan Hayward? Just to name a few. They all starred in enough movies with roles substantial enough to make it interesting.
  5. StephanieBlue

    IS ANYONE GONNA' GO TO "TRUE GRIT?"

    Jeff Bridges mumbled?? You mean like he did in his "award winning" performance for Crazy Heart Colin Firth should have won for A Single Man. So the fact that Bridges is reprising a role made famous by the incomparable John Wayne is ludicrous. I'll go see the movie just in case I can prove myself wrong. But I'm more anxious to see Colin Firth in The King's Speech Edited by: StephanieBlue on Dec 26, 2010 9:39 PM Edited by: StephanieBlue on Dec 26, 2010 9:39 PM
  6. Thank you for showing this wonderful movie. It was nice to see Mick LaSalle commentate with Robert Osborne. I have both LaSalle's books regarding pre-Code movies and share his appreciation for Norma Shearer.
  7. StephanieBlue

    Miriam 10.18

    When do we get to see "The Story of Temple Drake" ?????
  8. StephanieBlue

    MELISSA TALMADGE COX AT KSFF!

    would like to help with the festival if needed, but haven't received a reply from the address on the website. Thank you!
  9. StephanieBlue

    Universal Monsters-Lupita Tovar

    Got the book Universal Studios Monsters by Michael Mallory for my birthday. Great book. I pulled out my Universal Monster Movies DVDs and watched the Spanish Dracula movie. Lupita Tovar is still alive? That would make her almost 100 years old. There is an interview with her on the DVD and she looks incredible!
  10. StephanieBlue

    Best Musical of All Time

    One of the greatest movies of all time "A Night at the Opera" has singing. Kitty Carlisle and Allan Jones.
  11. StephanieBlue

    Best performance EVER by an actor and actress

    How about Bonita Granville and Marcia Mae Jones in "These Three"? The bully and the victim. Awesome performances by these girls at 13 and 12.
  12. I apologize ahead of time, but I get sooooo tired of reading the same movies listed as all time favorites over and over and over and over. Here's some different ones to consider. 20s-- *Show People and The Patsy*--80 years later, Marion Davies still makes me laugh. Comedies in the 20s were the best. You had your Keatons and your Lloyds, but Davies was the master of impersonations. Female actors in the 20s were famous for their overacted dramatic roles, Davies was a breath of fresh air. 30s-- *City Lights*-- Relevant to today as well, Charlie Chaplin's tramp has nothing to his name, but his generosity to provide a blind girl with sight is heart-warming and the final scene stands the test of time. *Marie Antoinette*-- Movies of the 30s were about elaborate costumes and who wore clothes better in her day than Norma Shearer. Don't get me wrong, I love Bette Davis, but Norma Shearer's transformation in this movie proved she could act just as well as Davis in Jezebel. 40s--*The Heiress*--Olivia deHavilland's Melanie in Gone With the Wind was not believable for me; however, her role in The Heiress was. I know what it's liked to want to be loved, what it is like to be betrayed and then mad as hell. Her transformation from a door mat to a strong heroine, reminds you of Bette Davis' role in "Now Voyager". 50s--*Shane*--Of all the John Wayne and Randolph Scott westerns to choose from, Alan Ladd had a quiet strength in Shane and I enjoyed the chance to get to know the him through Brandon de Wilde's character. 60s--*Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?*-- The 60s in general was weird, and what's more weird than watching Bette Davis "lose it" more and more each day in this film. 70s--Kramer Vs. Kramer--took the topic of divorce from the man's perspective. Movies were usually about what the woman or mother had to sacrifice for her children. This was raw and emotional and for the first time, I got to see what the father had to sacrifice for the love of his child. 80s--we just lost him, so John Hughes movies defined the 1980s for me. I was a teenager in the 80s so I could relate to all of the heartache and suffering Molly Ringwald had to go through. Oh my goodness and who could ever forget *Planes, Trains and Automobiles*. 90s--*Thelma and Louise*. Another character transformation film. Two friends from different situations learn a lot about each other and themselves. In the process, they learn not to settle. 2000s--the best movie and the best acting so far this century is Marion Cotillard and *La Vie En* *Rose*. Watch it and there will be no need to explain. Message was edited by: StephanieBlue Message was edited by: StephanieBlue
  13. I apologize ahead of time, but I get sooooo tired of reading the same movies listed as all time favorites over and over and over and over. Here's some different ones to consider. 20s-- *Show People and The Patsy*--80 years later, Marion Davies still makes me laugh. Comedies in the 20s were the best. You had your Keatons and your Lloyds, but Davies was the master of impersonations. Female actors in the 20s were famous for their overacted dramatic roles, Davies was a breath of fresh air. 30s-- *City Lights*-- Relevant to today as well, Charlie Chaplin's tramp has nothing to his name, but his generosity to provide a blind girl with sight is heart-warming and the final scene stands the test of time. *Marie Antoinette*-- Movies of the 30s were about elaborate costumes and who wore clothes better in her day than Norma Shearer. Don't get me wrong, I love Bette Davis, but Norma Shearer's transformation in this movie proved she could act just as well as Davis in Jezebel. 40s--*The Heiress*--Olivia deHavilland's Melanie in Gone With the Wind was not believable for me; however, her role in The Heiress was. I know what it's liked to want to be loved, what it is like to be betrayed and then mad as hell. Her transformation from a door mat to a strong heroine, reminds you of Bette Davis' role in "Now Voyager". 50s--*Shane*--Of all the John Wayne and Randolph Scott westerns to choose from, Alan Ladd had a quiet strength in Shane and I enjoyed the chance to get to know the him through Brandon de Wilde's character. 60s--*Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?*-- The 60s in general was weird, and what's more weird than watching Bette Davis "lose it" more and more each day in this film. 70s--Kramer Vs. Kramer--took the topic of divorce from the man's perspective. Movies were usually about what the woman or mother had to sacrifice for her children. This was raw and emotional and for the first time, I got to see what the father had to sacrifice for the love of his child. 80s--we just lost him, so John Hughes movies defined the 1980s for me. I was a teenager in the 80s so I could relate to all of the heartache and suffering Molly Ringwald had to go through. Oh my goodness and who could ever forget *Planes, Trains and Automobiles*. 90s--*Thelma and Louise*. Another character transformation film. Two friends from different situations learn a lot about each other and themselves. In the process, they learn not to settle. 2000s--the best movie and the best acting so far this century is Marion Cotillard and *La Vie En* *Rose*. Watch it and there will be no need to explain. Message was edited by: StephanieBlue
  14. StephanieBlue

    Identity Inquiry

    Top one looks like Virginia Cherrill from "City Lights" and the bottom one looks like Mae Murray
  15. During Summer Under the Stars month. My viewing of TCM has decreased over the years because in order to see any of the "underdog" performers that I like, I have to get up or stay up at 3 a.m. There are plenty of other performers other than Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn who made a wonderful laundry list of movies. Thank you for Gloria Graham and Merle Oberon, but if I see one more tribute to Judy Garland, I am going to go insane and sing a show tune in the streets. My neighbors will not like that.

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