LawrenceA

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Everything posted by LawrenceA

  1. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    Fear No More (1961) - 6/10 Low-budget thriller with Mala Powers as a woman on the run after escaping from police who were questioning her about a murder. She crosses paths with nice-guy Jacques Bergerac who decides to try and help her, only he begins to wonder if she's really in trouble or is it all in her mind? With John Harding, Helena Nash, John Baer, Anna Lee Carroll, Robert Karnes, and Peter Brocco. The story doesn't make a lot of sense if you take time to ponder it, but the movie moves quickly and it's entertaining. Bergerac seems to mangle a fair share of his dialogue, though. Source: Something Weird DVD
  2. LawrenceA

    Hey, Canadians...

    I've often read lamentations from the boards' Canadian contingent about TCM skipping Canada Day programming. If the channel were to devote 24 hours to Canadian themed films, what titles would you choose? You don't have to post a full 24 hours worth of stuff if that's too much for you, just a title or 3. However, full schedules are also appreciated. I ask this as I just watched The Canadians, and it's pretty bad.
  3. LawrenceA

    Hey, Canadians...

    I enjoyed aspects of that, although it felt like a Lifetime Channel TV movie. What was the irritation about?
  4. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    The Explosive Generation (1961) - 6/10 B-movie drama featuring William Shatner as a new high school teacher who dares to discuss the subject of sex education, causing an upheaval throughout the community. With Lee Kinsolving, Patty McCormack, Virginia Field, Stephen Dunne, Phillip Terry, Arch Johnson, Edward Platt, Suzi Carnell, Jan Norris, Billy Gray, Vito Scotti, Jocelyn Brando, and Beau Bridges. This was racy stuff for the time, although it's nothing that you couldn't play unedited on network TV now. There's a lot of "frank talk" with the kids, including some boys questioning military service, an early tremblor of the anti-war earthquake later in the decade. Source: internet
  5. LawrenceA

    Film Music Credits

    No, but he would have the "music by" or "composer" credit, which holds the most weight of the three, and is usually included in the "up-front" credits on a film.
  6. LawrenceA

    Film Music Credits

    I'll give it a whirl. "Composer" means that they composed the score for the film, meaning any of the orchestral music heard, excluding pre-existing songs that may be used throughout. "Soundtrack" means that some song or piece of orchestral music that the person wrote is heard on the soundtrack. Like if a comedy uses a snippet of the Jaws theme, then John Williams gets a soundtrack credit. "Music department" can mean a lot of things: they played an instrument in the orchestra/band, or they may have advised one or more people in charge of music for the film, or they just sat in on the recording sessions and gave their thoughts.
  7. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    The Exiles (1961) - 5/10 Unusual blend of documentary and artifice from director Kent Mackenzie. The movie follows one night in the lives of a group of young Native Americans living in Los Angeles. The cast is all non-professionals playing themselves, or at least versions of themselves, with most of the dialogue based on transcripts of previous interviews that the cast gave to the filmmakers. So the "actors" are re-enacting scenes that they had described at an earlier date, but presented here as spontaneous and true-to-life. For me, the experimental nature of the film didn't really work, with much the film's 72 minute running time taken up with boring, mundane stuff, a lot of small talk and meandering pointlessness, which may, in fact, have been part of the point. The saving grace for me was the excellent B&W cinematography of L.A. Source: TCM
  8. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    LA 2017 (1971) - 5/10 Episode of the series The Name of the Game directed by Steven Spielberg, later re-shown as a standalone TV movie. Series star Gene Barry is on his way to a conference when he has a car accident that renders him unconscious. He's awakened in the year 2017 in a dystopian future-Los Angeles that has relocated underground following an ecological disaster that has left much of the planet uninhabitable. Barry tries to learn what exactly led to this nightmare scenario, and is disturbed by the fascist government led by Barry Sullivan. Also featuring Sharon Farrell, Paul Stewart, Severn Darden, Edmond O'Brien, Louise Latham, Michael C. Gwynne, and Geoffrey Lewis. This "glimpse into the future" gets much of it wrong, as usual, but it's still amusing to see the worries of the day, most of which are still present. Some noteworthy touches: the cops are also degree-holding psychiatrists that spout psycho-babble; milk is a luxury and status symbol; a visit to a nightclub features an elderly acid rock band performing for a bunch of geriatric hippies; and a discussion about a "supposed sighting of a real Negro in Cleveland", which hasn't been seen since "the riots of '86". Source: YouTube
  9. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    The End of Summer (1961) - 7/10 Japanese comedy-drama from writer-director Yasujiro Ozu. An elderly sake company owner (Ganjiro Nakamura) worries his extended family when his health falters and his financial choices come into question. Featuring Setsuko Hara, Michiyo Aratama, Yoko Tsukasa, Daisuke Kato, Akira Takarada, and Chishu Ryu. Ozu returns to familiar territory, including marrying off unwed relatives, familial obligations balanced against personal fulfillment, and the simple pleasures of domestic life. It all looks nice, each shot meticulously composed, and with added attention to ambient sound effects, like the sound of crickets chirping in the afternoon. Ozu only directed one film after this, 1962's An Autumn Afternoon, before dying in 1963 at age 60. His frequent star, and a major Japanese film fixture of the post-war years, Setsuko Hara, would also only appear in one more film, 1962's Chushingura. She lived in retirement another 53 years, passing away in 2015 at the age of 95. Source: The Criterion Channel
  10. Add anger, and you've just described 99% of all 21st century news media.
  11. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    Dead Eyes of London (1961) - 7/10 German crime thriller featuring Joachim Fuchsberger as Scotland Yard Inspector Larry Holt, who is tasked with finding those responsible for the deaths of several elderly men in recent weeks. His investigation eventually leads to a gang of blind killers controlled by a mystery man. Featuring Karen Baal, Dieter Borsche, Wolfgang Lukschy, Ady Berber, Eddi Arent, Anneli Sauli, Bobby Todd, and Klaus Kinski. This was based on an Edgar Wallace novel that had also served as the basis for the 1939 Bela Lugosi film The Human Monster. I liked some of director Alfred Vohrer's oddball choices, such as having a shot that zoomed in on a drinking glass and then out from the back of another character's head, or another scene shot from inside a man's mouth as he's using a waterpik to clean his teeth. Klaus Kinski looks cool sporting some mirrored shades, and 6'6'' Austrian wrestler Ady Berber, looking like Tor Johnson, is a memorable sight as a blind, hairy, hulking brute. Source: YouTube
  12. LawrenceA

    Descartes - What Is Known Clearly and Distinctly

    I had cause to glance at the Trivia section on Tor Johnson's IMDb page today, and noticed this tidbit: "Due to his enormous weight, he had a habit of breaking toilet seats." I'm sure he'd be proud to see that listed as part of his legacy.
  13. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    The Connection (1961) - 6/10 Arthouse drama about a group of heroin addicts hanging around an apartment in Harlem, waiting for their connection to arrive with the day's fix. The characters monologize about their pathetic lives, while a few of them play jazz music. The film is presented as a documentary being filmed by a director (William Redfield) and his cameraman (Roscoe Lee Browne, in his debut). Featuring Warren Finnerty, Jerome Raphael, Jim Anderson, Barbara Winchester, Henry Proach, and Carl Lee. Shirley Clarke directed this film version of a play which structurally resembles the later mockumentary genre, only without the humor. The subject matter and the presentation ensure that this will have little appeal outside of the arthouse crowd, as most audiences will find this tedious, self-indulgent and of minimal entertainment. I applaud the effort and the intent, but the end product isn't something I'd want to revisit. Source: internet
  14. LawrenceA

    Elizabeth Warren Pres. Candidacy.....

    I don't see this lineup as very strong. In fact, as they stand right now, Trump will steamroll over every one of them. And you know how I feel about Trump. Things may change as the field narrows and their platforms and personalities become more focused, but I'm not holding out much hope at this very early point.
  15. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    Come September (1961) - 7/10 Breezy, light romantic comedy with Rock Hudson as a wealthy businessman who arrives at his Italian seaside villa for a rendezvous with his lover (Gina Lollobrigida) only to discover that his butler (Walter Slezak) has rented the place out as a hotel, and that a group of teenage American girls (including Sandra Dee) is currently in residence. When a group of young American men (including Bobby Darin) show up, too, Rock and Gina's romantic getaway turns into a chaperone assignment. Also featuring Joel Grey, Joan Freeman, and Brenda de Banzie. This isn't my usual sort of movie, but I enjoyed it nonetheless, despite the chaste corniness of it all. The cast are all good, and I especially liked Lollobrigida, an actress that I'm normally not too fond of. This was the movie where Dee and Darin met, and they were married before the film was released. Source: Universal DVD
  16. LawrenceA

    The Triumph of Donald Trump

    Oh, yeah. She was the witch Angelique. I didn't recognize her.
  17. LawrenceA

    The Triumph of Donald Trump

    Who is that?
  18. LawrenceA

    Hey, Canadians...

    I'm all for a 24-hour salute to Rowdy Roddy Piper on TCM.
  19. LawrenceA

    Hey, Canadians...

    I forgot about Guy Maddin. I'd have to include at least one of his strange films. I liked that one, and My Winnipeg. I need to see more.
  20. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    The Canadians (1961) - 5/10 Clunky western about the origins of the Northwest Mounted Police. Canadian soldiers Robert Ryan, Torin Thatcher and Burt Metcalfe try to make peace with Sioux natives led by Michael Pate who have moved north from the U.S. into Saskatchewan following the Battle of Little Big Horn. A tentative peace is made, but it's soon threatened by trigger-happy ranchers led by John Dehner. Also featuring Canadian opera star Teresa Stratas as "The White Squaw", Jack Creley, Scott Peters, Richard Alden, and John Sutton. This was the directorial debut of screenwriter Burt Kennedy, who later admitted to being clueless how to direct a picture at this point. The potentially-interesting material is served poorly by bad pacing, clumsy editing, and weak performances. The copy I watched was pan-and-scan, so the beautiful widescreen location scenery is also lost for the most part. Source: Encore Westerns
  21. LawrenceA

    Hey, Canadians...

    I'm not Canadian, but the first thing I always think of when I see Canadian films brought up are the works of David Cronenberg, particularly his earlier stuff (They Came from Within, Rabid, The Brood, Scanners, Videodrome), and Denys Arcand's The Decline of the American Empire and The Barbarian Invasions.
  22. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    I saw this when it was new, and I liked it. Tim Roth was on a roll with his career at the time. This may have been the first movie that I saw with the Russian mob as the criminal focus. They'd soon become inescapable in both TV & film crime dramas and action flicks.
  23. LawrenceA

    I Just Watched...

    By Love Possessed (1961) - 5/10 Glossy, sluggish soap opera melodrama. Alcoholic Lana Turner is having an affair with attorney Efrem Zimbalist Jr., a partner in the law firm of her emotionally-distant husband Jason Robards. Meanwhile, Zimbalist's son George Hamilton is also struggling with romance as he woos nice-girl Susan Kohner. Featuring Barbara Bel Geddes, Thomas Mitchell, Yvonne Craig, Everett Sloane, Gilbert Green, Frank Maxwell, Jean Willes, and Carroll O'Connor. Action director John Sturges seems an odd choice for this Peyton Place-esque soaper, and his skill with action scenes doesn't really help enliven this dull affair, nor does an obtrusive score by Elmer Bernstein. Source: internet
  24. LawrenceA

    ClassiCategories

    Airport The Terminal Unaccompanied Minors
  25. LawrenceA

    Hottest Teen Idols

    They show up fine for me, as well.

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