aficionada

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  1. I'd agree. In fact, the first few minutes could be almost any film; I'm reminded of Cary Grant going to Katherine Hepburn's door in The Philadelphia Story. Bogart here holds back, all right. Little of the brashness yet the hard-boiled detective veneer does show in his response to the sister's rather uninhibited introduction. Somewhat subdued, yes, but there.
  2. No doubt everyone is put in mind of "The Shawshank Redemption" when watching Gilda; but I confess I've never thought about it as film noir. Not so, however, with the other Hayworth/Ford collaboration, "Affair in Trinidad." To wit:
  3. No doubt everyone is put in mind of "The Shawshank Redemption" when watching Gilda; but I confess I've never thought about it as film noir. Not so, however, with the other Hayworth/Ford collaboration, "Affair in Trinidad." To wit:
  4. Who is more clever, who displays a better turn of phrase? Webb's character is clearly, from the opening scene to the last, a megalomaniac, a rather nasty fellow (and that's sooo good!). Andrew's detective gives him a run for his money, but Lydecker won't see it coming, so steeped is he in his ego as to be blinded by his own radiance. This point-counterpoint dialogue of film noir is one of the attributes I love, and when paired with superb casting, it doesn't get much better. I will readily admit that I am captivated by the art direction, the set dressing, and wardrobe as well; I've had a screenshot of Laura's striped jacket on my phone for years, in the hope of replicating it one day.
  5. I was able to see a couple of the films yesterday. It's odd, but I always seem to catch "High Sierra" at the same point-about 20 minutes before the inevitable end. This time, however, I was captivated by the locale, having just made the annual pilgrimage to #Manzanar, which included lunch in Lone Pine and a view of Mt. Whitney, all of which are featured in the film. Glad to see "The Maltese Falcon" again, "Nora Prentiss" for the first time, and "Dark Passage;" I adore #AgnesMorehead, too! Paying close attention not only to the lighting, but the camera angles this time around.
  6. It is a bit annoying and takes some getting used to; for instance, I get notifications that someone has responded to a post and I cannot figure out how to find it! As to losing your post, however, it does autosave. Click at the bottom left of your post to retrieve.
  7. Today's notes on films set in San Francisco reminded me of one of the reasons I like this film; The City plays itself marvelously in Dark Passage. The opening scene, in which the POV switches (at least initially) between first and third person places the viewer not only behind the eyes of Bogart's character, but invites one to consider his choices-should I or should I not leave the shirt here? The thrill of a death row escape, the sense of being hunted, and the ever-present danger of recapture lend themselves to the cautionary tale that is this particular #noir classic.
  8. This is the first film of the three this week that I've actually seen; and although I admire it quite a bit, it's here that the problematic racist portrayals of the era and genre are front and center. Cringeworthy.
  9. One thread per day, right? We have a clip four days a week.
  10. Frankly, I thought I saw one signal between the engineers that connoted a 'nip;' I expected one of the two engineers (fireman?) to pull out a flask or small bottle to go along with the cigarettes...
  11. Good observation, @spsthompson. I thought for a moment that one engineer used a hand sign for 'drink,' and I fully expected the other to produce a bottle, take a nip, and pass it. This action would have added to the 'laissez-faire attitude' displayed by the workers engaged in their daily drudgery.
  12. The music! In this four plus minute opening sequence, I couldn't help but anticipate an unusual, perhaps morbid, event. Will one of the engineers be dead when the train emerges from the tunnel? What is the small box/tall pole/chain mechanism? Will the brakes fail, overshooting the gare at Le Havre? As an aside, there was one shot that recalled Hitchcock's North by Northwest for me. Oh, and then there is the music!

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