DIANE DYAN BIGGS

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About DIANE DYAN BIGGS

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    HOUSTON HEIGHTS TEXAS
  • Interests
    PHOTOGRAPHER
    POET
    ARTIST (OIL ON CANVAS)
    BLUES SINGER
    WRITER

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  1. NOTE OF BEING MORE PERCEPTIVE: I JUST SCREENED LAURA FOR THE MILLIONTH TIME AND HEARD AND SAW THINGS THAT I MISSED BEFORE....THIS CLASS HAS DEFINITELY HEIGHTENED MY PERCEPTIVE ON FILMS NOIR AND IN LIFE ITSELF. TRUE STORY: SOME YEARS BACK I TOOK A STUDY COURSE ON HOW TO STUDY A SUBJECT, ANY SUBJECT. THE PREMISE BEING THAT ONCE YOU KNOW THE NOMENCLATURE OF A STUDY, FOR INSTANCE IF THE SUBJECT PHOTOGRAPHY, YOU MUST LEARN ALL THE WORDS AND SYMBOLS THAT ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PHOTOGRAPHY. ONCE YOU HAVE MASTERED THE NOMENCLATURE, THE STUDY BECOMES LESS FOREIGN AND EASIER TO LEARN. WELL, DURING THIS COURSE, I HAD JOINED A LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY HERE IN HOUSTON THROUGH AN EXHIBIT THAT I SAW AT THE HOUSTON DOWNTOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY, WHERE MEMBERS HAD ON EXHIBIT THEIR PHOTOGRAPHS THAT HAD AWARDED THEM RIBBONS OF FIRST, SECOND OR THIRD PLACE IN THE 11 MONTHS PRIOR TO THE EXHIBIT. THE EXHIBIT ALWAYS HELD IN JANUARY EACH YEAR. ONCE I JOINED, I ENDED UP HAVING 2 OF MY PHOTOGRAPHS EXHIBITED THE FOLLOWING JANUARY AND WAS SO PLEASED IN FULL FILM NOIR PASSION TO BE ABLE TO TELL YOU THAT I HAVE BEEN HUNG IN THE HOUSTON DOWNTOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY. PRIOR TO MY PLACING AND BEING HUNG, I FIRST DEFINED THE WORD PHOTOGRAPHY, WHICH LED MY SEEING WITH FRESH EYES.....ALL IMPORTANT TO A PHOTOGRAPHER, IN SEEING THE WORLD AROUND ME AND THE ART THAT I WAS ABLE TO CAPTURE ON FILM. IT WAS THE BEST EXPERIENCE OF MY LIFE, AS FAR AS MY WORK WAS CONCERNED. MY TALENT TRIPLED TO THE TREE TOPS AND BEYOND!!! MY PICTURES REFLECTED THIS KNOWLEDGE AND STILL TODAY, I SEE WITH A PERSPECTIVE THAT I WOULD HAVE NEVER HAD, HAD I NOT DEFINED MY STUDY. THANKS FOR LETTING ME SHARE. BY THE WAY, THE DEFINITION OF PHOTOGRAPHY IS : SIMPLY PUT: PHOTO IS LIGHT AND GRAPHY IS WRITING.....SO TO DEFINE PHOTOGRAPHY IS SIMPLY PUT: WRITING WITH LIGHT......AND IN FILM NOIR, IT IS WRITING WITH LIGHT AND AS LITTLE OF IT AS POSSIBLE AND THAT MAKES THE SHADOWS SO COOL AND INVITING AND SO PLEASING, ESPECIALLY IN PURPLE.....THANKS AGAIN.....
  2. WOW!!! I WISH I HAD WRITTEN THIS AND I FEEL I COULD EVEN ADD TO IT BY SAYING THAT ON 99 RIVER STREET I ALMOST GOT ALL WET, BUT WOUND UP BACK AT DINER HAVING COFFEE WITH ALL THE THRONG OF FILMS NOIR, EVERY ACTOR, EVERY MUSICIAN, EVERYONE OF THE WONDERFUL AND BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE WHO MADE THESE FILMS...FRITZ LANG ASKED TO SEE MY PHOTOGRAPHY AND Miklos Rozsa'S MUSIC IS PLAYING PURPLE PLEASURE JUST FOR ME.....WHEN THE BELL RANG, IT WAS THE POSTMAN SAYING HE COULDN'T DELIVER MY LETTER BECAUSE OF INSUFFICIENT POSTAGE AND MY LIFE WAS SPARED ANOTHER DAY TO WATCH YET ANOTHER FILMS NOIR.....HAVE ANOTHER CUP OF COFFEE, TIP MY FEDORA ONE MORE TIME....I LOVE ROBERT MITCHUM, HATING THAT HE DIES IN A LOT OF HIS BEST MOVIES....TO LIVE TO SEE ONE MORE FILMS NOIR. THANKS VERY MUCH FOR LETTING ME SHARE....
  3. Daily Dose of Darkness #32: Over Now (Opening Scene from Criss Cross) - Discuss how the opening of this film exemplifies the noir style and substance. The aerial view, the titles rolling, the music playing; superb music by Miklos Rozsa, makes this noir style and noir substance. I have not yet seen a movie with Miklos Rozsa's music that fell short of magnificent!!! Outstanding music man!!! And, as I have written before in these posts on the daily doses, music is probably a good 75-80% of a good film, to me!!! It seems I may have seen this film a very long time ago....I am really looking forward to seeing it again, with the freshest eyes ever for film noir!!! -- Now that you have seen all 32 Daily Doses, what did you take away from the Daily Doses assignment? Did it contribute to your learning about film noir? YES!!! A hundred times, yes!!! Fresh eyes, good eyes, quick hands, musical beats....the daily doses are richer than you can believe. But then you must know how grand they are....since you put them together. Such insight and visionary greatness. A true artist has this vision. You, sir, are an artist.....a film noir artist, of the highest order. AGAIN, THANK YOU, DR. EDWARDS FOR THE RICHEST SUMMER EXPERIENCE OF MY LIFE. THE HEAT IN HOUSTON IS HOTTER THAN YOU CAN IMAGINE ALL THRU THIS #NOIRSUMMER EXPERIENCE; ALAS, THE NOIR SHADOWS COOLED THINGS OFF AND I STAYED IN THE SHADOWS, NOT JUST TO BE COOL BUT BECAUSE IT IS COOL!!! GOD BLESS YOU!!! SINCERELY, DIANE DYAN BIGGS AKA NOIR KNIGHT OWL #NOIRSUMMER
  4. I really love what you say here.....I was thinking the same thing about Hume Cronyn. Until now, I don't recall him in any films noir. Much like seeing William Talman, who played on Perry Mason as the DA for years, the good guy and then seeing him in the DD FROM THE HITCH HIKER....WHAT A SWITCH. Then to get right down to it, Raymond Burr had this whole other noir career before PERRY MASON that I only learned about, for the first time in HITCHCOCK'S REAR WINDOW....THEN I'd see him in more and more and more noir films. Really is interesting. I prefer the nicer sides of these guys, which I am sure fits who they truly were in life, rather than the bad guys. But I bet they had a blast doing these films! Better to act out a bad guy, than to be a bad guy. thanks for letting me share. #NOIRSUMMER
  5. Daily Dose of Darkness #31: No Escaping Noir (Scene from Brute Force) -- What role does music (especially the record playing Wagner) play in the intensity of this scene? Gangsters usually turn up the music in scenes such as these in many noir films to cover the sounds of the beating being inflicted upon someone. In this case, it's the police brutally beating a man, which is not uncommon even today. In fact there are a dozen cases seen on tv due to the recent digital age of the SMART PHONE, DASHBOARD CAMERAS (IN POLICE CARS THEMSELVES), OR VIDEOED BY PEOPLE ON THE STREET WITNESSING SUCH BRUTALITY. To me, there is no place for this type of force, in life....yet it is more straight forward than the covert manipulations of many family members upon their relatives or in some church going circles around the globe. Neither behavior is acceptable to decent ethical and forth right human beings; it is behavior that is exhibited, all the same. I wasn't aware that it was Wagner. But since during this post war era, Germany being the birthplace of Hitler, the SS, and such SIEG HEIL brutality, and the fact that WAGNER was a German composer, IT FITS, LIKE HAND IN GLOVE, to this sorted scene. -- Based on what you've learned in this class, how does this scene fit in with your understanding of early postwar film noir (films released in 1946 and 1947) and the development of the noir style and substance? The captain, doing the beating, is paranoid about information that he wants or needs, perhaps to solve a case or perhaps to find out what is known that implicates him in some way. I have not seen this film, so I really don't know what to think of this....and I am having trouble in writing to/speaking to style and substance. I wish I knew what it is about this terminology or the definitions of the words themselves that I don't fully grasp. I just don't know. I don't know how much of this movie I will be able to watch. Depends. #NOIRSUMMER
  6. Daily Dose of Darkness #30: Into the Darkness (Scene from Desperate) -- Describe how this scene uses cinematography to accentuate the brutal beating of Steve Randall (Steve Brodie). Ruthless. The lighting was everything. The swinging light was really something else. My only understanding of Raymond Burr growing up was Perry Mason, and I loved that TV show, still do. When I first saw R.B. in a different style movie or became aware of him was probably in HITCHCOCK'S "REAR WINDOW". At first I didn't even know it was Raymond Burr. This was really ruthless and brutal. The lighting didn't make it acceptable or less ruthless and brutal but it did lend an aura of evenness about the scene, a certain coldness that could only be achieved in the dark, with so much light on the subject. The words used to convince the guy getting the beating to go to the police, were actually more convincing than the beating....if it had been conducted in broad daylight, it would never have worked at all..... I especially liked the fact that at first the man getting the beating was not being seen but the light and dark and shadows and the swinging light were in the scene.....that's using cinematography for all its worth. Isn't it? -- How do Mann and Diskant utilize different points of view to heighten the tension in this scene? The focus on Raymond Burr, who is obviously in charge of this beating. First, when the beating begins, he just stands there, then he goes to the phone, then the man says kill me here, then R.B. breaks the bottle and comes closer to the man....it was his words that convinced him to go to the police....not the broken bottle. The camera angles on R.B. in each segment of the dose was superb. #NOIRSUMMER
  7. BEFORE I BEGIN, LET ME JUST SAY THAT THIS LEARNING EXPERIENCE HAS BEEN GRAND!!! I AM GLAD IT HAS COME TO A SUPERB ENDING WITH ALL THESE FANTASTIC HEISTS; HOWEVER, MY LEARNING FOR THE SUMMER IS NOT OVER: NEXT I TACKLE HOW TO IMPROVE MY SCRABBLE GAME. I PLAY DAILY WITH ONE OF MY YOUNGER SIBLINGS, AND SHE CONSISTENTLY MOPS THE BOARD WITH MY WORDS SCATTERED; SECOND PLACE IS NOT MY NOIR STYLE. LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!! SPECIAL THANKS TO TCM, FOR THE SUMMER OF DARKNESS, WITH EDDIE MULLER, WHO LED ME TO DR. RICHARD EDWARDS AND SHANNON CLUTE FOR PODCASTS. THESE 3 MEN ARE MY NEWEST BEST FRIENDS, AND I REALLY LOVE AND APPRECIATE YOU EACH FOR SUCH SUCCULENT DATA WITH WHICH I GO FORTH AND EXPLORE MORE FILMS, YET NOT APOLOGIZING AND FEELING GOOD ABOUT MY PICKS AND FAVORITES, EVEN IF I CAN'T ENJOY THEN ALL. I AM JUST ABUNDANTLY GRATEFUL FOR THE ONES THAT I CAN ENJOY!!! SINCERELY, DIANE DYAN BIGGS/A.K.A. NOIR KNIGHT OWL, UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN, NOIR GOODNESS TO YOU!!! Daily Dose of Darkness #29: Noir City (Opening Scene from The Asphalt Jungle) -- Discuss how this film depicts and utilizes this "unnamed city." Additionally, why do you think the film is entitled "The Asphalt Jungle?" The city is unnamed, houses, streets, lots of cement: lots of buildings, like in a warehouse district of a city, and the man ducks inside a diner, in the middle of nowhere among all these warehouse type buildings. You'd have to know that diner was there ahead of time....you'd never know it was there with just a mild look around...in the way that man was walking and then GOING right up to that diner door and went in. He handed the gun to the man behind the counter without a word and the man behind the counter put the gun in his cash register. Well, it's a jungle out there. It's either got nothing but miles and miles of trees and bushes and that kind of jungle (complete with wild animals and such) or, in this case it's got miles and miles of pavement, asphalt with miles and miles of buildings and A small diner in the middle of nowhere.....nowhere, in the midst of a jungle with wild men roaming around with guns, passing them to be hidden by other men, 'cause it's a jungle out there....."THE ASPHALT JUNGLE". THIS IS WHAT I THINK, WHY I THINK IT'S CALLED THE ASPHALT JUNGLE. -- Describe the film noir characteristics, in both style and substance, of these opening scenes. -- Why are these opening scenes an interesting choice for a "heist film?" What are we learning about one of its major characters (Dix) that might be important for later in the film (and I'm not asking for any spoilers, just character insight)? I don't believe I have seen this film before. If I did, it was quite awhile ago. I thought the same about several films this Summer. So, until I watch it this time, I really won't know. Judging from this opening, I have not seen it. Well, DIX, must have done something with that gun. The man at the diner is probably his friend, so he hid the gun for Dix. I'm thinking Dix and the man at the diner are friends, like I said, and that they are gonna be in whatever comes up from now on together....the man at the diner might not know what got him to the diner this day....but from here on out, the guy at the diner knows everything. I'm looking forward to seeing this film. I recall hearing the title and I didn't know until now that it was a heist film. I love a good heist film. So, I can't wait!!! #NOIRSUMMER
  8. I remember the Loretta Young show as well. Cause For Alarm is a movie I have seen before. It is a haunting film. And a comedy of errors about the delivery of the mail. It is truly a different kind of twist to any other film I can think of. Well, worth watching at least once. #NOIRSUMMER
  9. In what ways does Miles Davis' score (improvised while watching scenes from the movie) work with and contribute additional layers of meaning to Louis Malle's visual design? I have never seen this film before, and I have never heard this particular Miles Davis score; however, the music sweeps across the man and woman as they are talking on the phone and in and thru the visual of the entire scene, as if the man and woman were in the same room....and not only in the same room, but making love. As the camera takes us to the inside and outside of the office building to the call box in which the woman is leaning across the phone itself, as if it were a bed pillow, further indicates that she is seducing the man to do something, then to come to her (as were her instructions, within 30 minutes, it would be all over and she would get into his car, just the two of them alone.) This music contradicts what is being seen on the screen, as far as buildings and credits rolling and the bigger fact that this man and woman are not in the same room together.....yet the music says that they are.... I am really big on music in movies....amazing how the right music can treat a scene, add to it or take away from it. I am an artist and I love music. I always notice if the music was done by the same person in certain films or if the similar things in 2 films that I like are linked and why....and often the music is the common thread. I look forward to trying to view this film. I can't promise I will watch it all. I have a feeling it is subtitles and I am not fond of that. I am intrigued by this dose; however, and I will do my best to watch, with fresh eyes all that I can to learn something new. #NOIRSUMMER
  10. "Final Clues and Last Words." : It looks like the last words of whoever that lady was in the closet were: "FOR HOWARD $5.00. and I suspect that, that ain't all folks. Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence. When asked for this, I am sorry, there is something in this ? or thread that I must not fully understand...but I don't know what it is exactly.....I have not been able to wrap my brain around this ? or answer it every time it is asked.....style and substance? I don't get that....if anyone can help me out on that...please let me know...thanks. -- What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot? Puritanical neighborhood, community....and they won't let a woman stuffed in a closet, dead, go unpunished..... -- Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s? Home values and that punishment for wrongs was strictly enforced at all times. #NOIRSUMMER
  11. -- Do you see evidence, even in the film's opening scenes, for Foster Hirsch's assessment that the dialogue in this film sounds like a "parody of the hard-boiled school" or that "noir conventions are being burlesqued"? YES, I SEE IT!!! MY LUGGAGE MISSES ME TOO!: True story: A friend of mine married a foreigner so he could get a baby out of her and have a citizen of the U.S. and ruin her life? Well, she didn't have any luggage and I thought I would hear from her and that she would return my bags later on.....she packed and moved and I never heard from her again. She had lots of trouble after marrying that man and that's enough reason never to hear from one......film noirish for sure.... -
  12. -- Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene. The man in the window looks down on the street below. The people in the street below are all doing their perspective jobs or tasks at hand. They might not even know in what order or in what frame of time reference they are doing their jobs; they're just doing their jobs. That brings us back to the man in the window.....he's clocking their movements...the same people every day arriving at the same time entering the band, leaving the bank...the armored car armed guards that is. The man who delivers the flowers, is there as well. In and out, precise timing noted by the man in the window. His watch, the clock on the wall across the street, outside the bank.....time ticking by....seconds, minutes not really noticed by anyone but one who is marking the time.....day in and day out....planning, counting the seconds as if they count, because they count for the precision of the plan...... -- What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film? The dialog rolling across the screen with the music saying, explaining, letting us know or rather might as well state: this is film noir, be alert now, everything from this point on is crucial to your well being, especially if you're going anywhere near the bank within the next two and a half hours..... #NOIRSUMMER
  13. Takoma1, on 16 Jul 2015 - 3:34 PM, said: Members 103 posts Posted Yesterday, 11:01 PM I just have to ask: all of the people remarking on the fact that Ernie is "emasculated"--what is the equivalent of that for his wife? If Pauline is robbing Ernie of his masculinity, are there ways in which he is robbing her of her femininity? In other words, if Ernie is being denied the American male dream of a respectable job and a dutiful wife, what is the female American dream? What is Pauline's ideal? What should she be aspiring to? Where does she draw her self-worth (aside from having a husband with high status)? Is her desire for money at odds with the American dream, or is it a grotesque extension of it? I'm genuinely curious about what you guys think about this. I feel like I have a pretty good handle on what life would look like for a happy guy, but I'm not so sure when I think about the "perfect" life for a woman. I had a great-aunt who was in her "prime" during the 50s. She was an (awesome) teacher, and she took her job very seriously. In a conversation with my father, he expressed the opinion that, had she lived in this day and age, she would have probably preferred to stay single--working her job and traveling (she's been to more countries than anyone I've ever met). I sometimes wonder how economic realities and social niceties impacted the direction of her life, and what her version of a "perfect" living situation would have been. Dear Takoma 1: This is an issue I have wondered about ever since I found out what "emasculated" meant. Not to bore you to death: just let me say: My husband kept accusing me of emasculating him. I finally asked him what that was. He told me. I couldn't agree or disagree. Because what I was doing was trying to defend myself against all the oppression and suppression he was heaping on me in such doses that I could now write 100 films noir scripts on him and his influences over me alone, since I have taken this course...The impact of life on us is amazing. I'm still trying to execute my career path. I've had more door slammed in my face than I care to share just now. Your Aunt probably did exactly what she wanted to do. I can't be sure. It just sounds like she might well have, since she traveled so much. In my original post for this d.d. #24, I commented on how their marriage was a mess, and that probably started with each of them before they even met. Then they did and said things that just seem to be what we as humans do, when things don't turn out the way we hope for and on and on and on...... Thanks very much Takoma 1 for your post...it sparked more insight for me and creative juices are flowing and that's always a good thing, when you're an artist, as I am an artist!!! SINCERELY, DIANE DYAN BIGGS NOIRKNIGHTOWL@AOL.COM I'D LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. #NOIRSUMMER
  14. -- Compare and contrast how director Karlson shoots and stages the boxing scene as a contrast of styles between cinema and television. This is not why I like this movie. In fact, I started not to watch this movie because of the boxing. When I realized the whole movie wasn't just about boxing, I watched it and now it is going to be played on TCM again coming up this week. In fact it airs on Friday, July 17, 2015. -- Discuss the scene's social commentary in the interactions between Ernie (John Payne) and Pauline (Peggie Castle). Whether it's social or just married bliss, they seem to blame the other for not being the people or having the success that they both thought, hoped and dreamed that they would have. In any case, the social commentary, people are forced to do what they must do to put food on the table. It was really clear cut in this time of history, in our country. It was a disgrace to be on welfare, for instance. So this injured boxer can't box, and loses his one chance to be who and what he wanted and for him feels it a disgrace that he has to be a cab driver (reminded so by his wife, at least). Then the wife, yes, she could have been the show business success, but is reminded by her husband that she was just a show-girl. I guess this exchange is social commentary. But in many ways, it really boils down to 2 people who have problems in their marriage and badger each other every time they become upset with their lot in life. They are seemingly victims of circumstances that they can't seem to change and won't change and vicious circle that exists in such far too often. #NOIRSUMMER
  15. - Discuss the scene in terms of its acting and staging. In this brief scene, what do you see as the interpersonal relationships between Sam (Heflin), Walter (Douglas), and Martha (Stanwyck)? If you have seen the entire film, avoid larger points about the plot, and focus simply on what you are seeing just in this scene. Suddenly, this seems easy to talk about, or the question is easier. Sam is not naive but he isn't a corrupt man either. He's asking the D.A., played by Douglas for a favor for old times sake. When he asks him, it's almost as tho he's holding something over the D.A.'s head, so he has to comply with Sam's request. However, as Sam is leaving, Walter seems to shift in his stance on the favor, and rides the fence, says he'll try, on the verge of saying drop dead, being polite only in a restrained way. Walter has no intention of being coerced into anything. There seemed to be a hint of blackmail involved, when Sam first asked Walter for the favor. So in walks Martha, that's when Walter's attitude changed and Sam was suddenly a kid again with the love of his life, Martha. Of course, reality now is they aren't an item and when Sam suggests that she be happy to have missed that circus train....in question form....she says she's not so sure. Well, that enrages Walter. Oh yes, he's enraged. He's a flaming maniac, he's a criminal, he's got the election in the bag and Martha is behind that think all the way. Sam doubts it or tries to suggest that it could fall through. -- From this early scene, what are some of the noir themes that you expect will play out in this film? I expect that Martha will hook up with Sam, perhaps in a romantic interlude or either she'll ask him for his help for something. He's still not the criminal, in this film....so he's going to be used, if that is possible. Only because he loves Martha and because that love started long ago, when they were younger and innocent and no dirty WALTER WAS AROUND. -- What other films or settings in the Summer of Darkness lineup remind you of Griel Marcus' observation that "the most emblematic noir location is a small, vaguely Midwestern city?" HAVE TO STUDY THIS ? MORE FOR A STRONG, GOOD, RIGHT ANSWER. #NOIRSUMMER

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