rayban

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Posts posted by rayban


  1. 23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

    i also consciously left TROY DONAHUE out of my review because he had such little presence and screen time.

    couldn't help but notice THEME FROM A SUMMER PLACE again- bad movie good luck charm that it is (also appearing of course in THE CROWDED SKY)

    Troy Donahue was the gorgeous young man who did not think that he had a chance with Connie Stevens.

    Don't forget, Grant Williams impregnated her - and she loved him madly.

    And Bert Convy was being pushed on her - by her parents and his.

    But what was your take on Conn White (Grant Williams' character)?

    Was he just too busy planning his climb on Mt. McKinley?

    Or was he just not that serious about his involvement with Susan Slade?

    • Like 1

  2. 1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

    connie-stevens-us-singer-and-film-actres

    I saw SUSAN SLADE (1961?) for the first time last night...

    it was DELISH.

    CONNIE FRANCIS plays the daughter of DORoTHY MAGUIRE- who apparently made  ENEMIES FOR LIFE of the hair and make-up people- and LLOYD NOLAN- who I actually think gives the best performance in PEYTON PLACE- that doesn't have anything to do with anything, I just think he handles himself quite well in the courtroom scene.

    CONNIE has waist-length tresses and she and her folks live in a FAAAAAAAAAAAABULOUS ASIAN STYLE HOME ON THE CALIFORNIA COAST OVERLOOKING THE SEA CRASHING ON THE ROCKS in MONTERREY. RON AND NANCY ARE PROBABLY RIGHT DOWN THE STREET. .

    Connie has waist-length tresses and she gets a second horse for her birthday. I hate her. sort of.

    i mean, she can ROCK A FALL like no other-

    th?id=OIP.Xho4POxenwvmEichImmQTwAAAA&pid

    ASIDE- THE LEITMOTIF of horses, horse-riding and weird-**** horse people got DAMN OLD DAMN FAST you could even say they were "beating" it...

    it is a shame DH LAWRENCE did not live to see this movie.

    Connie gets pregnant and the father falls out of the picture and DOROTHY MAGUIRE- her mother and graduate of the JOAN CRAWFORD SCHOOL FOR PARENTING- SAYS THEY CAN PASS OFF THE KID AS HERS, MEANING DOROTHY MAGUIRE IS GOING TO CLAIM to all their society friends (among whom is none other than LOVEY HOWELL herself Natalie Schaeffer!) THAT SHE IS:

    1. the one who is pregnant and...

    2. GOING TO GUATAMALA TO HAVE THE BABY, BECAUSE- YEAH- THAT'S TOTALLY A PLACE KNOWN FOR THE ACE MEDICAL CARE AND SECURE SURROUNDINGS IN WHICH TO BIRTH A BABY...MIND YOU,THAT IS ONLY IF CALCUTTA IS ALREADY BOOKED FOR THE WEEK.

    I would give anything for one of the old society ladies at the luncheon MAGUIRE gives where she tells them she is pregnant and moving away to ask IF THE RABBIT DIED LAUGHING.

    (YES, THAT'S FROM THE GOLDEN GIRLS)

    i cannot tell you how many times i rewatched CONNIE'S BIG "FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION" MOMENT WHERE SHE TEARS OFF HER DRESS AND RIPS AT HER HAIR. I REMEMEBER COMING ACROSS THIS IMAGE WHILE WATCHING BAD MOVIES WE LOVE, AN OLD SHOW ON TNT AND NEVER KNEW WHERE IT WAS FROM, BUT IT HAS BEEN BURNED INTO MY WORM-ADDLED BRAIN EVER SINCE.

    th?id=OIP.H8Slc4n9FSpIoGJFjkTypQHaEK&pid

    "Susan Slade" is soap-opera at its' best.

    Delmar Daves became an expert practitioner of the genre, beginning with "Parrish".

    • Thanks 1

  3. 1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

    Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967) Twisted Soap Opera - Neo Noir

    Reflections_in_a_golden_eye.jpg

    "There is a fort in the South where a few years ago a murder was committed."(Carson McCullers)

    Directed by John Huston. Huston was one of the directors credited with creating one of the first noticed "American" Film Noir after WWII when a backlog of US Films hit Paris, The Maltese Falcon (1941). The other 1941 film curiously was the (in reality) much darker looking visually I Wake Up Screaming (1941) directed by  H. Bruce Humberstone ) it was a one off film, Humberstone never directed another Noir.

    John Huston went on to make the classics, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), Key Largo (1948), The Asphalt Jungle (1950), The Misfits (1961), and The Night of the Iguana (1964).

    Written by Chapman Mortimer and Gladys Hill and based on Carson McCullers novel. The Cinematography was by Aldo Tonti (The Nights of Cabiria (1957)) and uncredited Oswald Morris.

    The film has seven major characters starring Marlon Brando as Major Weldon Penderton, Marlon Brando as Major Weldon Penderton, Brian Keith as Lt Colonel Morris Langdon, Julie Harris as Alison Langdon, Zorro David as Anacleto, Robert Forster as Private L. G. Williams, and Firebird the stallion.

    Pretty much right from the get go McCuller's script heads us right back into to that crumbling decadent south land of sexual ambiguity, fetid relationships, and moral swamps, sort of key words for the similar the works of James Leo Herlihy, William Inge, and Tennessee Williams.

    Originally the film was released with a golden tint. A a sort of golden noir. Each scene, supposedly, was to contain stylistically one object normally colored. This tied into the films title which derived from the houseboy's watercolor of a golden peacock in whose eye the world was a reflection. I've seen that print once, it's suggestive of the monochrome ambiance of Black and White. It worked for me.

    Its not a Noir of gritty cityscapes, or one of bleak desolate deserts. Its a film of the rural night, a shady neighborhood, a stable, a house of shadows and dark interiors both psychical and mental.

    Most Noirs and Neo Noirs are usually Crime Genre films, but not all. During the Classic Era the Motion Picture Production Code had guardrails on Film Noir. On one side was the rail for violence, the other side for sex and other taboo subjects. With the demise of the code Film Noir lost it's guardrails and was allowed wander. It had the freedom to exploit whatever and go wherever it wanted to weaving off the usual highway and all over the psycho-sexual landscape. It's an adult noir.

    Brando gives a bravura performance of a man going slowly to pieces as his whole world beings to shift. He's like a burnt marshmallow hard just on the outside, but a gooey mess on the inside. He's the complete opposite of testosterone laden Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire.

    Taylor is  still good, a bit past her use by date. She's not smoking hot. She's on her way to being a full figured woman. Though in reality both she and her potential prey are confined to the "pool" of the army base. I guess if you are the most desirable woman in that small pool it works. Julie Harris is surprisingly tolerable in this and quite believable. Brian Kieth is playing his usual gentle easy going persona. Forster doesn't have much to say and Firebird is an impressive part of the tale. Some screencaps on Film Noir/Gangster pages. 7/10

    The movie version brings out the seething underbelly of Carson McCullers' novella.

    The movie is so much "gayer" than the novella.  

    • Like 1

  4. He said that he was deeply ashamed of his first film, "Tammy and the Doctor".

    But he shouldn't have been.

    It got him from summer stock in Fishkill, New York to the big screen.

    And, then, he went on to "The Victors" and "Lilith". 

    • Like 1

  5. 11 hours ago, TopBilled said:

    Tuesday August 20, 2019

    Screen Shot 2019-08-19 at 2.52.57 PM.jpeg

    Dorothy McGuire in the 40s on TCM

    TILL THE END OF TIME with Robert Mitchum

    THE ENCHANTED COTTAGE with Robert Young

    GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT with Gregory Peck

    A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN with James Dunn

    And, later in the day, the ineffable "Susan Slade".

    • Like 1

  6. 3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

    Stolen Kisses  (1968)  -  7/10

    h39p97Pn0b55PV63PislftZslhk.jpg

    French comedy from writer-director Francois Truffaut. Antoine Doniel (Jean-Pierre Leaud), the young protagonist of The 400 Blows (1959), is now in the army, but he's soon drummed out of the service for being irresponsible. Back in civilian life, he struggles to find and maintain a job until he becomes the unlikely new employee of a private detective agency. While Antoine tries to rekindle an old affair with contemporary Christine (Claude Jade), he finds himself also smitten with the wife (Delphine Seyrig) of one of his clients (Michel Lonsdale). With Harry-Max, Andre Falcon, Daniel Ceccaldi, Catherine Lutz, and Marie-France Pisier. I went into this expecting to hate it, but was in fact charmed and amused. It has sharp dialogue, a great cast of characters, and excellent pacing. 

    Source: The Criterion Channel

     

    It's a totally beguiling film.

    The first film in the Antoine Doniel trilogy.

    • Thanks 1

  7. 17 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

    The Girl on a Motorcycle aka Naked Under Leather  (1968)  -  4/10

    151.jpg

    British drama with Marianne Faithfull as an unhappily married woman living in France who decides one day to get up early, put on her full-body leather cat-suit, jump on her Harley, and drive away, hopefully to rendezvous with a former lover (Alain Delon). While cruising along, she reminisces about her past and what led to her leaving. With Roger Mutton, Marius Goring, Catherine Jourdan, and Jacques Marin. Directed by noted cinematographer Jack Cardiff, this often looks very good, which is the only reason I rated as highly as I did. Otherwise it's insipid, horribly dated, and laughably pretentious. It also holds the distinction of being the first movie rated with an "X". Faithfull is awful, and her narration adds nothing. While much of the film is visually interesting, there's also a lot of terrible rear-projection stuff that undercuts the rest. This is said to have a cult following, but I can't guess why. The trailer is great, though, and the filmmakers should have stopped there.

    Sample romantic dialogue: "Your toes are like tombstones."

    Source: The Criterion Channel

    girlmotorcycle_06_1.jpg

    How did they get Alain Delon to do this?

    the-vintagent-the-girl-on-a-motorcycle-2


  8. 3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

    I liked Volver a lot, but I haven't seen it since it was released. I was late coming to appreciate Almodovar, and he is an acquired taste. Outrageous camp, but not as grotesque as John Waters stuff, and with more genuine heart. The first Almodovar film that I saw was Talk to Her (2002), which I loved. I later saw All About My Mother (1999, terrific), Bad Education (2004, not for the easily offended), Volver, and The Skin I Live In (2011, a loving homage to Euro-horror films, particularly Franju's Eyes Without a Face). It was only then that I went back and watched the film that brought him his first international attention, 1988's Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. I liked it, and it's probably to most accessible of his films that I've seen. I watched Matador (1986) last week and reviewed a few pages back in the thread. It is also quite shocking and not for sensitive sensibilities. 

    I have copies of Law of Desire (1987), Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (1990), Live Flesh (1997), and Broken Embraces (2009) in my stack of stuff to watch, and The Flower of My Secret (1995) in my Criterion Channel queue. I need to watch that before the end of the month, when most of the Almodovar movies are scheduled to leave the site.

    "Law of Desire" must be seen.

    It is totally unique.

    tumblr_p2h6bpMEps1wlmvwwo4_400.gif

     

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1

  9. 8 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

    Peter Fonda was a guy who was always around in my movie-viewing life, but I just haven't seen a ton of his movies. Here's all that I have seen. You can tell I would easily go 10 years between Fonda viewings. No offense. He certainly followed his own muse and had a very long career.

    1963 Tammy and the Doctor (Universal)
    1964 Lilith (Columbia)
    1966 Wild Angels (AIP)
    1967 The Trip (AIP)
    1969 Easy Rider (Columbia)
    1981 The Cannonball Run (20th Century Fox)
    1996 Escape from L.A. (Paramount)
    2007 Ghost Rider (Columbia)
    2007 Wild Hogs (Touchstone)
     

    He had a memorable nude scene in "The Trip".

    p7754_i_h12_ac.jpg?d=270x360&q=50

    It might be time for a re-evaluation of his work.

    "The Young Lovers" aired recently on TCM.

    cb42b3b8eb5b06c88fa94ad9c8005494.jpg


  10. His early film appearances were noteworthy.

    He had a delicacy that was most attractive and refreshing.

    Later on, he decided to toughen up the image.

    But I could never forget him in the one with Jean Seberg and Warren Beatty.

    Peter+Fonda+&+Jean+Seberg.jpg

    RIP, Peter.

    • Like 1

  11. "Walking On Air" - Joseph Santley - 1937 -

    starring Gene Raymond and Ann Sothern and Henry Stephensen and Jessie Ralph -

    this film feels like an adaptation of a Broadway musical without most of the music -

    but it is totally airy and extremely stylish -

    a rich girl, whose father disapproves of her boyfriend, whom she wants to marry -

    hires an out-of-work singer to impersonate a French count who wants to marry her -

    this French count is very obnovious -

    in that way, she hopes to win her father's approval of her original choice -

    Gene Raymond and Ann Southern float through this concoction with the greatest of ease -

    they bring grace, beauty and charm to the proceedings -

    and, guess what?, they sing, too -

    spoiler alert -

    the girl's plans go haywire -

    she falls in love with the bogus French count -

    and gets to marry him, too -

    walking-on-air-ann-sothern-gene-raymond-

     

    • Thanks 1

  12. 1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

    Yeah, I was thinking the same thing while watching Stage Struck, and having recently seen her in Kapo. I read up on her life and career a bit earlier today. It seems she started to drift towards television when she should have been making more and bigger films. She later claimed that she did so to save her father (Lee Strasberg) from "any embarrassment my failures would cause", so she chose easy, quick and largely unnoticed TV work and B films. She also drifted into heavy drug use by the late 60's and her marriage to Christopher Jones. She claimed that their drug abuse lead to their child's birth defects. Of course later on she got sick and passed too young at age 60.

    Yes, it's a sad story.

    She showed such promise.

    Her autobiography is an eye-opener.


  13. 6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

    Stage Struck  (1958)  -  6/10

    220px-Stage_struck.jpeg

    Backstage drama, based on Zoe Akins' play Morning Glory, directed by Sidney Lumet. Susan Strasberg stars as Eva Lovelace, a small-town girl who comes to NYC to be a star on the Broadway stage. Her persistence and appealing naivete attract the attention of producer Lewis Easton (Henry Fonda) and writer Joe Sheridan (Christopher Plummer in his film debut). Also featuring Herbert Marshall, Joan Greenwood, Pat Harrington Sr., John Fiedler, Steve Franken, and Jack Weston and Roger C. Carmel in their film debuts. An updating of the 1933 film, made as a showpiece for Strasberg, who is very good here. I was also impressed with Marshall as an aged former matinee idol. The material is a bit too old-hat and predictable, but it's worth seeing if you're interested in the performers.

    Source: internet

    Henry-Fonda-Stage-Struck-1958-Vintage-St

    It's a shame that Susan Strasberg has fallen into oblivion.

    Perhaps it was the failure of her film career.

    Perhaps she wasn't that interested.


  14. "The Caine Mutiny" - Edward Dymtyrk - 1954 -

    starring Humphrey Bogart, Van Johnson,  Fred MacMurray, Tom Tully, etc .

    This movie was both a novel and a play - both were very successful.

    I saw the play on Broadway - it's a gripping courtroom drama.

    It starred Michael Moriarty.

    The film shows us everything that is the material of the trial.

    Only in the last thirty minutes does the movie enter the courtroom.

    The movie is essentially a bastard version of the play which has little of its' power.

    Still, the movie is in very competent hands - the director and the actors.

    Robert Francis, who has a leading role, made only four films before his untimely death - an airplane crash.  

    Humphrey Bogart, who is excellent, deserved the play version.  

    the-caine-mutiny-humphrey-bogart-fred-ma

    • Thanks 1

  15. On 8/10/2019 at 1:55 PM, TopBilled said:

    Interesting Ray. He never came across that conflicted to me. But if he did like other lads, that would be interesting. 

    I've been watching him on the later edition of "Wagon Train" with John McIntire.

    Robert Fuller's face was full of so much pain.
     

    • Thanks 1

  16. 14 hours ago, TopBilled said:

    What makes you think so? Just curious...

    From watching him, you just got the impression that he was harboring "a terrible secret".

    • Thanks 1

  17. "Almost A Bride" - Richard Wallace - 1949 -

    starring Shirley Temple, David Niven, Tom Tully,  Gloria Holden, Daryl Hickman, Robert Ellis, etc .

    a delightful comedy about a teenager who, due to circumstances beyond her control, finds herself the newest love interest of a disreptuable playboy -

    she has to feign amnesia - and this fact gets her into the trouble -

    also, the playboy who is going through his latest divorce is saddled with the girl's lawyer father who is the prosecuting attorney -

    add the girl's loving boyfriend and the girl's best friend and a noisy boy neighbor -

    and you have a steamy brew of comic complications -

    shades of "Lolita" but the aging playboy is glad to be romancing the girl, because he thinks that her father will treat him more kindly in court -

    the entire cast is having such a good time -

    and you will, too 

    Shirley Temple meets "Lolita" -

    would you believe it? -

    e32096e1583759d656464b6f14e9b86c.jpg

    also known as -

    220px-A_Kiss_for_Corliss_poster.jpg

    • Thanks 1

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