T-Newton

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About T-Newton

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 10/05/1990

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Oregon
  • Interests
    Movies and animation are my go-to interests, as I study both academically. I also enjoy music (primarily rock, metal, blues, and jazz) and video games.

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  1. Bringing out the '90s kid in me... There was one episode of Steven Spielberg's Animaniacs that paid homage to Alfred Hitchcock... Even the opening of the show pays homage to the opening of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, his anthology TV series, and yes, they even play the iconic theme of it... There is also a Halloween-themed episode of the Nickelodeon TV series Rocko's Modern Life that also pays homage to Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and Hitchcock in general, entitled "Ed is Dead - A Thriller". Film-wise, there was a 1961 animated short from Warner Brothers entitled The Last Hungry Cat starring Sylvester and Tweety that is done in the style of an Alfred Hitchcock crime thriller, even to the point where the narrator does a rather impressive impersonation of Hitchcock. Then there is also the title sequence from the 1973 Blake Edwards film The Pink Panther Strikes Again, in which the cartoon panther holds up a silhouette of Hitchcock.
  2. 1. I get the feeling that the movie is going to be about fear and a sense of helplessness. 2. The eyes. The main reason is that eyes can show one's emotion right off the bat, and in this case, we see the actress is uncomfortable and nervous, especially when her eyes start moving left and right quickly. 3. Saul Bass' title sequence and Bernard Herrmann's score practically go hand in hand in that they both give the feeling of being unsettled, fearful, and distraught.
  3. 1. I feel that Hitchcock wanted to tell us that this is the primary thing we're going to be focused on throughout the entire picture, because we're practically seeing the entire complex as what our crippled main character, who is played by the legendary James Stewart, is seeing it. 2. We see that Jeff has had quite a history, as he is left in a wheelchair with a cast on his leg, therefore, he's unable to do anything physically. 3. An immobile spectator. As I said in the first question, we're basically seeing what he will be seeing throughout the picture. As we see each apartment, everyone is rather unique, but they're all just living their ordinary lives without a care in the world. 4. Oh yeah. This is definitely one of his most cinematic pictures, and one of the greatest suspense thriller stories ever put on screen.
  4. 1. Hitchcock's "criss cross" begins with the two characters getting out of the taxi in different ends of the train station. We also see the train crossing the tracks, serving as symbolism, and as we head onto the train (still with the camera pointed at their feet at this point), it is where these two come across one another, as soon as one of them accidentally taps the other's shoe. 2. The shoes, since they stick out and give us an idea on who is who. 3. Tiompkin composes the music to make it feel like at first is suspenseful and full of mystery for the opening credits, but as the credits end, it's more lively and normal in tone.
  5. 1. Our good ol' Uncle Charlie is calm, collected, and above all direct. He's basically the equivalent of a snob, but with an added sense of mystery and intimidation. He may be wearing a fancy suit with a lot of cash on hand, but he is well aware that reality is catching up to him and is about to lose it all. 2. When the film begins, I immediately get the feeling that a murder had taken place beforehand. As soon as we see our main character in his get-up, cigar and all, he clearly has a story to tell. We also don't know who the two men that were brought up are, but as soon as the story begins, we are eventually going to find out who, and why they are after this man. 3. What I noticed is that when we see the children play, the music is all happy, but as we transition further and further into the hotel room where our main character resides, the music starts getting darker and darker in tone until we finally enter the room, where it's all quiet and suspenseful. In a way, film composition and musical composition aren't too different from one another, because they both set the overall mood.
  6. 1. There are a few things I've noticed here that were different from the openings we've seen in prior Daily Doses. For one, the movie doesn't open in a public place with a lot of people. It opens with a gate leading to the abandoned house that is Mandalay. The second thing is the narration from the main character, whom we aren't introduced yet until a flashback happens, which is the third thing. 2. The POV shot, no question. Hitchcock was a pioneer of the POV, and he utilizes it to its fullest as if we, the audience, are going through the gate to gaze at the house with a tragic history. 3. Pretty much all of the movie is revolved around this house, as if the house is really an omnipotent being that somehow manipulates those that reside in it. I should mention that this is my mother's favorite Hitchcock film and one of her favorite films overall.
  7. 1. Hitchcock opens this picture like it's the opening to a slapstick comedy. The tinny flute music heard as the film begins sets an overall happy tone and mood for the film. 2. Caldicott and Charters are just two simple men who end up being the comic relief based on their conversations. 3. He uses the characters and camera to make Iris as if she was royalty, and the manager leaves his post to please her as if he was contractually obligated to when she enters the room.
  8. 1. From the different Hitchcock pictures I've seen thus far, I definitely see a pattern with the openings. We're given a specific place where something is about to happen (in Hitchcock's case, somewhere public with a lot of people), and we are introduced to the characters that we will be stuck with for the remainder of the picture. What deviates the intro to The 39 Steps from prior pictures is that it's more lighthearted and lively. 2. I agree with Rothman's assessment. The main character that we're introduced to in this picture is just an ordinary, everyday joe who unfortunately ends up in the wrong place at the wrong time and gets caught in the spider web that is espionage. 3. With this film and the films before it, Hitchcock would pick a perfect place where nothing could possibly go wrong in reality, whether it be a music hall or an old fashioned movie house. It is here that he works his magic where a supposed "safe haven" is anything but.
  9. 1. The characters, no question. Once the picture begins, we are immediately introduced to the protagonists and the antagonist. 2. Peter Lorre is often portrayed as a bad guy in most of the pictures that he's been in. I can only name a few where he isn't one (i.e. Richard Fleischer's 1954 film 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea). For this picture, he appears as someone who has met the jumper beforehand (we see this clearly as they confront one another) and has something to hide, yet blends in with the rest of the crowd. 3. That would be a sudden incident that gets the crowd riled up, in this case, a skiing accident, and we see fast jump cuts as the crowd tries to help the skier.
  10. 1. Well the scene begins with Alice appearing in the middle of a conversation about a knife murder. As soon as she closes the phone booth door, we hear absolutely nothing until that door is opened again. We are practically hearing what Alice is hearing at this point. 2. When Alice goes over to sit at the table, the conversation from another character suddenly turns to murmurs, with the only word sticking out of that being "knife". When she is asked to cut the bread, it sounds as though the word "knife" is being spoken more harsher and harsher until it is yelled out. 3. Film is primarily a visual form of art, therefore, audiences are more focused on what's happening on the screen than just hearing the movie. This way of thinking applies more today as opposed to back then.
  11. 1. In this scene, I see the POV dolly/tracking shot as a way of expressing intimidation and increased tension between the two boys and the girl. Questions in the minds of moviegoers who haven't seen the picture beforehand begin to pop up, such as "Who is she going to choose?", and "What will happen after she chooses?". 2. I think it's because it adds a whole 'nother layer of suspense to the overall mood of the film, and it makes us feel what certain characters are feeling at that point in time. 3. What comes to mind is his use of close-up shots that he uses in all of those pictures. It's an ingenious way of instilling emotion into the audience when used properly, and for Mr. Hitchcock, he nails it every single time.
  12. 1. What I see is the dramatic increase in anxiety within the character, which begins with the mirror, and suddenly fading into a party scene with upbeat, and rather bouncy, yet uncomfortable music that brings it full circle. 2. As we see the scene of the couple in the mirror, we also see the main character with a feeling of building anger and hatred. Then, we see a montage, along with a series of overlaying images, which depict what the main character sees in his mind, some of which are rather exaggerated. 3. We see a contrast between the room our main character is in and the room next to it, where his wife is. One is more closed and calm, while the other is more open and manic. What brings them all together is the mirror placement. Because he is more focused on the mirror than his manager, he begins to transition from calm and collected to the point where he can't help but forcefully interject between his wife and his rival.
  13. 1. The mood and execution are the two main differences I saw between this picture and The Pleasure Garden. As some have pointed out already, The Pleasure Garden is more laid back, as it starts with just a normal everyday scenario inside a dance hall before the shock and terror. The Lodger, on the other hand, just goes right into the action without any explanation, and with that, it serves as a great start to any murder mystery story. 2. The screaming woman, for starters, and the addition of quick camera transitions, the large amount of supposed witnesses and passer-bys, not to mention that one guy that tries to make light of the situation. 3. Even without sound, we can see the terror in the woman's facial expressions as she screams for help. I don't think any other shot other than a close-up of the woman screaming can better illustrate the emotion of straight-up fear. We immediately get the idea that something happened or is about to happen, and as such, we the audience sit back and be the witness to something much bigger. The one scene that comes to mind that's similar to that in Hitchcock's later work is during the infamous shower scene in Psycho (1960).
  14. 1. Yes, I see the beginnings of the "Hitchcock Touch" in regards to the lighting, camera positioning, and how the actors in the film emote in this picture. These would somewhat become his trademarks in Hitchcock's future films, even during the transition from the silent era to sound. 2. Oh, most definitely. 3. One of the great things about the silent era is that a scene can be just as powerful, funny, or emotional with just a few or no words spoken as a scene in a picture with sound where there is more room for exposition. So yes, there were limitations, but filmmakers used that to their advantage whenever possible.
  15. School's in!

    Little late to say this, but I too also finished the course, or more specifically, aced it. I am looking forward to getting my certificate and doing another online course with TCM and Ball State in the future. Thanks so much Dr. Edwards for this month of fun!

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