kjrwe

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Everything posted by kjrwe

  1. I was just thinking about the film The Asphalt Jungle and about Marilyn Monroe's character. A couple of thoughts: 1. I don't think that she actually had sex with that lawyer. When they're together near the start of the film, she draws back from his kiss very quickly and walks to the bedroom, leaving behind a shoe which he picks up. At that point, he calls up his assistant and asks him to start collecting money from those who owed money to the lawyer. That doesn't work, so the lawyer decides to take part in the criminal scheme. I think he was convinced that it would take a lot of money to get the young blonde to have sex with him. Later, when he thinks he's off the hook, he talks to her about a vacation. She seems all excited, but then the cops come in and there goes his plan. 2. It sounds like the young woman had a date with that Riedenschneider fellow (the one who was just out of jail). He said that he was able to get some info from her about that lawyer. I find it a bit hard to believe that she would have gone out with him in the first place. She showed an interest in the lawyer because he offered her a house to live in, but the guy straight out of jail had nothing to give her. What on earth would she want with a guy like that? Besides, where did she meet him? At that point, she wouldn't have had connections to him since he barely knew the lawyer. By the way, I love the way the commissioner finally brought her back to reality much later in the film.
  2. Obvious spoilers ahead... I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)? SPOILERS.... The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it). What are your opinions of the ending?
  3. The film Laura has a lovely soundtrack. The film Sabrina has an even lovelier soundtrack. I'll check out the Nat King Cole version of Laura one of these days.
  4. If I want to skip the ending, I just turn off the film. If I want to skip another part of a movie, I just fast-forward it. I don't have the patience to let the film play while I do something else.
  5. To those who really dislike the ending: skip it each time you watch the film. That's my personal suggestion. I absolutely dislike the ending of The Pink Panther, even though it's one of my favorite films. I just skip the last 15 minutes of it each time I watch this lovely film.
  6. At least they did complete the story before the professor woke up. That's the important thing. It's not like he woke up right when, in his dream, he's dumping the body or something.
  7. I dunno. I'm kinda glad that this dear professor was given a second chance at dealing with the "call of adventure" (as he put it). Even though the Hayes Code was in place, they could still have given it an ending outside of "it's all a dream". For example, the professor takes those pills and dies. His wife finds him like that when she returns from her holiday. (Maybe she had to return early for whatever reason.) Meanwhile, the woman in the window gets located somehow and gets arrested. They could have done it that way.
  8. kjrwe

    Laura (1944)

    By the way, what do others here think of the opening scene in Laura? I think that it was just Waldo's narcissistic nature which allowed him to think it would be okay to have a cop question him while he, Waldo, was having a bath. I don't think that it occurred to Waldo that Mark McPherson might feel uncomfortable at such a meeting. In the end, Mark handled it very well. He smirked a bit when Waldo got out of the tub and that was that.
  9. kjrwe

    Gun Crazy(1950)

    Of course back then they had to imply it in a very subtle way. The thing is that there is NO indication in the film that Rupert (Stewart) is gay - nothing subtle, nothing at all. As for the two criminals, it's pretty obvious that they were gay. Hitchcock wasn't subtle about that. In the film, they seemed to bond with Rupert because of his outlandish ideas about who should or shouldn't live.
  10. kjrwe

    Laura (1944)

    I'll listen to this radio play again one of these days. Sadly, I have really neglected my beloved radio plays and it's time to get back into them!
  11. I can't seem to find any threads here about radio plays, so I'll start one about radio play thrillers. Here are some favourites of mine which I have heard a number of times (and again recently): From Suspense: Till Death Do Us Part by John Dickson Carr, starring Peter Lorre. Here, an evil math prof explains to his wife what exactly he has in store for her. From Suspense: The Devil's Saint by John Dickson Carr, starring Peter Lorre. A young man wants to marry a woman he's just met, but first he has to "get past" her eccentric and creepy uncle by following certain instructions which he has for the young man. From Suspense: Will You Make a Bet With Death? by John Dickson Carr. A man is on a slow boat ride at a carnival with a woman, and he is explaining to her a bet which he made with his nasty stepfather...a bet about death. From Suspense: Want Ad, starring Robert Cummings. Brilliant inverted whodunit about a crook who gets exactly what's coming to him. Of all the inverted whodunits I've seen, or read, or heard on radio, this one I think has the best ending. Highly recommended. From Suspense: The Doctor Prescribed Death, starring Bela Lugosi. A doctor has an unusual psychological theory: someone who is suicidal can be convinced to murder someone else, and he decides to find someone suicidal to "convert", so to speak. From Suspense: The Fountain Plays, by Dorothy Sayers, starring Edmund Gwenn. A terrific story about blackmail and skeletons in the closet of a rich British homeowner. One of her best, for sure. From Campbell's Playhouse: The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, by Agatha Christie. Orson Welles plays both Poirot and Doctor Sheppard. Edna May Oliver plays the doctor's sister. I really like Orson Welles' introduction: he has some kind words to say about murder mysteries! From The Weird Circle: A Terrible Night. Here's an example of what can happen to those who get lost in the Canadian wilderness... haha. Be aware! From Inner Sanctum: The Voice on the Wire. A widow on an island is being terrorized by mysterious phone calls where the same person keeps telling her that she only has a few hours to live.
  12. kjrwe

    Laura (1944)

    I have heard the radio play Laura. If memory serves me right, Clifton Webb is the only one from the original cast who wasn't in the radio play. Even the character was renamed as Paul Lydecker. Or is there another radio play based on the film in which Clifton Webb does appear?
  13. kjrwe

    Thrillers which are radio plays

    Thanks for the link!
  14. kjrwe

    Gun Crazy(1950)

    Why is Stewart's character in Rope considered to be gay? There was no indication of him being gay - no evidence whatsoever. Rope is certainly an unusual film, and it's also based on a true story.
  15. kjrwe

    Gun Crazy(1950)

    I think that Gun Crazy is probably one of the films which got me into noir. It's one of the first noirs I've seen. John Dall was homosexual, but he could do a very convincing job of playing a straight man. For example, see the 1950 film The Man Who Cheated Himself. In Rope, the two killers were very likely both gay.
  16. Well, he tried to have sex with her in that one scene and she walked away from him. That's why I think that he wasn't getting laid as much as he wanted to...and maybe lately, it hadn't been happening at all. He probably figured that it would take more money to get laid, and so he went along with the plan to steal the diamonds. I still don't see why she would have gone out with that penniless Doc. That was completely out of character. He had nothing to offer her.
  17. He could walk off without being arrested because it was all a dream. Otherwise, he would have been arrested for sure.
  18. kjrwe

    Thrillers which are radio plays

    I'll need to check out some of those series. For example, I've never heard of Murder by Experts.
  19. kjrwe

    Top favorite Westerns

    True about John Wayne and Jane Fonda...but that doesn't affect how I feel about their films.
  20. kjrwe

    Top favorite Westerns

    Back to the John Wayne discussion....I'll just say that I don't give a hoot about the politics of actors. I only focus on what they do on the big screen. The rest is none of my business. Actually, the rest of it is probably just malicious gossip.
  21. kjrwe

    Best TV crime shows

    I like the first season of the Jeremy Brett Sherlock Holmes. That series did go downhill after that. (I think Jeremy Brett was very hot, too.) I'm glad that they were faithful to the stories. Basil Rathbone was good as Holmes, but I prefer him as a bad boy. Besides, why were those adaptations set in the forties? They had nothing to do with the literature, either.
  22. kjrwe

    Best TV crime shows

    The guest stars on Ellery Queen were extremely well-cast. Someone sure took the time to make sure that they really got the best people for the parts! Jim Hutton and David Wayne were well-cast, too. I think that David Wayne would have made a great Ellery Queen in the 1950s. If Jim had lived longer, he and his son could have done another Ellery Queen series. Totally a lost opportunity. *sigh* Yup, Kenneth More was the star of those Father Brown episodes. Some of them were kinda slow, but I do like a few of them...especially The Eye of Apollo, which is probably one of the most brilliant short stories ever written (mystery short stories). I heard that the recent version of it made too many changes to this story. Nope, haven't seen Rosemary & Thyme.
  23. kjrwe

    Recently Watched Mystery/Crime/Noir/Etc.

    I can't remember if I've mentioned the 1962 French film The Seventh Juror on this forum. I've seen it a number of times and each time I can't help but think what an amazing film it is. It starts out with a man (main character) murdering a young "easy" woman (as she's described later in the movie by a number of characters). When the woman's boyfriend is arrested for the crime, this man is chosen to be on the jury. The entire movie is terrific, but I admit that I was really floored by the final minute of the movie. VERY highly recommended.
  24. kjrwe

    Best TV crime shows

    I've seen a lot of the 1970s Columbo episodes and I enjoyed them all. I like some of the retro-1930s/1940s whodunit series, like Ellery Queen, Poirot, some of the Marple episodes, etc. A few of the early 1970s Father Brown mysteries were extremely well done, too.
  25. kjrwe

    Recently Watched Mystery/Crime/Noir/Etc.

    If anyone is looking for a more lighthearted whodunit to watch, I recommend the 1930s film The Mad Miss Manton, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda. In this film, a group of flaky high society ladies try to solve a murder mystery - the murder of a couple of their friends. Highly recommended.

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