overtherainbow54

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About overtherainbow54

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  • Birthday 05/12/1954

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  1. FilmMakerJr, there is not just one link, it shows up as each individual page of outline, etc. I don't see one line of anything. It looks like what in this course they called a pdf?
  2. FilmMakerJr Hi, I am not savvy on the computer, I am retired (older person) and have very little computer experience, so what exactly can I do to help?
  3. FilmMakerJr, I am having the same problem. I can download Musicals and Hitch but cannot get the Noir and Slapstick that I also took. The Generate Pub just doesn't work. If anyone knows how to or who to contact about it could you please post. I am not sure if it is Canvas or email through this course since they were the same set up so please let me know if you have someone to contact. These courses were wonderful but not enough time for the extra research into areas they touched on and always thought I would go back in and do so later. The downloads of the courses would make that so easy to go back and do now as I am retired now and have the time. Thank you all so much, I enjoy the message boards as people are so helpful and share so many good ideas and information.
  4. overtherainbow54

    Request

    I am able to download the Mad About Musicals course and last year's Hitchcock. And I see that other students who took Slapstick are able to do the same. But I am only able to download those two although I took Slapstick and Film Noir. Does anyone know how to contact Canvas or Ball State to ask questions about the downloads? As for students in this class if you want to download it on to your computer, go into your account and click on Settings. On the right side of the screen are 3 boxes: Edit Settings, Download Submissions, and Download Course Content. There are 3 options: Download ePub, Download Associated Files, and Regenerate ePub. Those should put a copy on your computer.
  5. I think Streisand's performance is more intimate because of it not being theatrical. It felt like she was singing to Nicky and not an audience. She wasn't putting on a show but expressing her feelings to Nicky. Nicky seems to lose some of his coldness from the beginning of the scene. He appears to be paying attention to the words Fanny is singing. The direction of Fanny moving away from Nicky when he expresses something she didn't want to hear and then as she begins to sing about needing people. As she moves away from him, Nicky follows behind her until he stops to apparently listen to what she is expressing. He seems to change, his expression softens as he attentively listens
  6. Some of my favorite movies are Cukor movies. I love Holiday 1938, Gaslight 1944, Adam’s Rib 1949, Pat and Mike 1952 and I think the reason is that his movies all seem so real, so natural. Even the scripts he chooses seem that the people in them could be real and the stories could have happened. If someone was arguing that Cukor was woman's director because he could coax great performances from actresses, they could prove that statement with my choices of his movies. The women in my favorite movies, the lead was a very strong woman. And Katherine Hepburn and Ingrid Bergman gave great performances in those movies. And the characters could have been real and all had a flaw. The scene is very emotional as Hepburn sees that she has no future in this world the professor has brought her into. Now she can't stay and she can't go back. The point and all Hepburn's emotional words don't seem to sink in with Harrison at all. The actors play their parts so well that you have such sympathy for Hepburn and disdain for Harrison. I think Cukor's direction would keep the viewers focused on the actors and the roles of Eliza and Higgins. He liked to keep the emphasis on character, dialogue, and emotion, not the background, lighting, or special angles.
  7. In the earlier musicals men went from the putting on a show, silly guy Mickey Rooney, talented singers and dancers, to lovers like Fred Astaire who made love in his dancing, to Gene Kelly who was a stronger more athletic dancer yet his style so so sexy and gentle like a ballet, to Robert Preston as a more regular guy whether it be that con man or the regular gay guy that existed whether you wanted to see it or not. Robert Preston has an appeal in both clips, the kind of appeal that a con man would have. He knows his targets and goes after them to what will convince to the end result he is seeking. He seems to have a personality that could sell you anything. I loved him in The Last Starfighter, 1984, not a musical, which was one of my son's favorite movies when he was little and we watched it constantly. Preston has that same kind of con man or man who would talk you into what he wanted in that movie as well. Maybe it is a piece of his real personality that comes out.
  8. overtherainbow54

    DAILY DOSE OF DELIGHT #13 (From GYPSY)

    The scene is like the classical musicals because it is directly facing the audience like a Broadway show or as burlesque is performed. It is more colorful like the later musicals. Rosalind's entrance performance is very dramatic and she is the typical Stage Mom. She is pushy and determined and this performance is similar to that of Auntie Mame. Sondheim’s lyrics that are sly, subversive, and edgy or innocent depending if a child is singing it or a woman. Change the age of the female, the actions while singing it and the song completely sends a different message.
  9. I read that the ballet visually reflected an artist's viewpoint so the ballet scene represents a painter's view of Paris. I think it is true of the film, not just the ballet. The color scheme and costumes throughout the film are important to the narrative as they reflect the mood of the time, art and the music as well as each character's personalities. This is a constant throughout the film, therefore, the stylized approach is also less than realistic and more a reflective idea of Paris and people at that time. Jerry isn't completely unlikeable, he just has low expectations of his art being sold or appreciated and like most people do not like criticism. He is just more honest about it than other people who are trying to sell their art.
  10. O'Connor seems to be a more lighthearted, an easier guy than Kelly in both personality gestures and dance movement. He just has a lightness about him that the more athletic Kelly does not. The Professor is a fun straight man as he takes it all without changing his facial expressions from the overly exuberant teacher. He is so enthusiastic in what he is trying to teach the men, so much that he invites ridicule. Kelly's dancing is always more masculine and athletic. O"Connors just seems lighter and as they are mirroring each other, Connors still seems to have a higher, lighter way about him as well as in his facial expressions. Kelly seems more serious to O'Connors clowning around.
  11. This film character falls in the continuum at the almost masculine range. She is proving that women or she, in particular, can do everything a man can. She doesn't seem to fit in the feminine end as well as other actresses. I think the film fails as a movie that represents equality with women. It is too dependant on the time in history and geographically and just don't think a musical fit it. I am sure all women back in the 1800's out west had to be tougher and do more masculine jobs as routine, not the exception and they didn't have the time or energy to sing about it. Doris Day grows as an actress in her roles in the 1950s from this lighthearted musical to the very serious movie following this, Love Me or Leave Me. It relies on her acting ability much more as a fictionalized biography. Then she seems to get more serious and leave the singing behind her. She later turns to comedy and does it well. Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona adds to the role of Calamity Jane in this musical. If it was a serious film, it would not work at all. In the musical Jane is almost a caricature or comical version of a tough tomboy woman who was equal to men in the wild west.
  12. The interaction of the characters is more like a conversation through song. They are not just singing a song while others listen. The 3 friends are trying to convince Astaire to be a part of the show. It is different from the musicals that were like a Broadway Show within the movie. Instead they were putting on a show for Fred's benefit. The costumes were not costumes but regular street clothes again giving the story and the song an impromptu gesture to convince Astaire of how fun entertaining is and reasons for him to do a show. They appeared to be just friends on an average day in their clothes who just happened to be on the set of a theater. The interplay was light and comical with examples of Levant appearing to be balancing the top level of friends on his shoulders, then he walks forward and they remain. Also, he carries a ladder in the front and by the time it gets to the back end, he is again carrying the ladder. Very comical and lighthearted.
  13. I put it in my comments after the Hitchcock class as well, could you please put the Lecture Video and Wrap Up in note or PDF form. The Lecture Notes can be cut and pasted to print to highlight and study even without PDF. But the talking segments are sometimes difficult to understand and more time consuming to take notes to highlight main points. I am trying to catch up and it would be so easy if I had the text version to easily cut and paste or download. I thought in the Film Noir class the videos were a choice to watch or read or both. But the last classes also had forums that were harder to take notes. It is just a thought for slower note takers.
  14. The scene at the bedside she is happy and relieved that her love is going to be alright. She is expressing her love and he is her life as well. She is happy doing laundry with him nearby, it makes her chores seem light with the love she feels. Nothing could detract from her happiness. If the woman was singing about her love for her child, it still would be complete happiness but more happiness for the child not with as it is for a spouse. You are in love with your spouse and you want to feel secure. With your child, you love that child unconditionally and want your child to feel secure. I find it strange that Louis B. Mayer thought he assisted to add a sense of unity to minorities who were enlisted at the time. Although serving in the military, Special African American units were formed, and African Americans, Japanese American and Jewish soldiers still suffered discrimination and abuse. It was important to let African Americans see images on the screen that refected them, and nice for the studios for the movies ticket sales but it did not necessarily help break down prejudice or discrimination in the Military.
  15. Each shot spotlights key actions as with Garrett's aggressive actions while singing at Sinatra. From the moment she won't let him pass her by, the camera follows her determined advances. When the music begins with her after him and then the singing lets the audience know exactly what the story is about. The camera follows her advances and then retreats with him. The song is there to progress the action and tell you exactly what the relationship between these two people will be. The beat of the music, while she advances, is the segue to the songs. As she chases him up the bleachers, the music quickens with each step until it is at a racing pitch. When he has nowhere to run, the music then leads her into singing to the cornered Sinatra.

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