Beth7Cam

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  1. 1. I don't believe a stylized approach is needed. Frankly, I prefer a less stylized approach and in some instances (like dream sequences) a bit of fantasy is expected and even prefered. 2. I don't think the character is unlikeable except when he criticizes the student at the beginning. I even felt sorry for him because business wasn't good and excited that someone was finally buying one of his paintings.
  2. 1. The pre-dance movements are very similar to the dance movements. I honestly don't see much difference. 2. The professor is an excellent "straight man". He remains serious while Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor's characters fool around. I was particularly amused my the expressions on the professor's face! 3. Each of the three men have their own part to play. Gene Kelly's character is what I would call the "typical" leading man-handsome, charming. O'Connor's character is charming as well, but his humor is part of his charm. The professor, the straight man, tries and fails to keep the two of them in line. This is one of my favorite scenes in the movie and a real treat to watch.
  3. 1.This is a different kind of character than we have seen before. Calamity Jane wants to be seen as "one of the boys". Most characters in the past were more feminine and needing to be "rescued", much more dependent on men. Day's character is an independent woman. 2. Doris Day can play a variety of roles, and that is a strength. She is a wonderful singer, which makes her perfect for a musical, but also excels in her dramatic roles. 3. I think Doris Day adds to any role she is cast in. Her persona definitely added to the character of Calamity Jane, making her more human and believable.
  4. 1. What really stood out to me is how they were constantly touching and interacting with one another. Each person has a part, no one is more important than anyone else. In previous musicals, there is usually one person singing. 2. The costumes are similar. They are all simple, not overly flashy. No one costume stands out. 3. There is a sense of friendship, cooperation and fun throughout this scene. They are helping one another, goofing off and playing.
  5. 1. Petunia is dedicated to Joe and his recovery, but does not neglect her daily chores. 2. I really don't think the song would change much if it were being sung about a child. The underlying themes(love & devotion to family) would remain the same. 3. This film is important because it shows that attitudes are beginning to change about minorities.
  6. 1. I find the use of props (such as the baseball and the hat) particularly interesting in this clip. Sinatra's character clearly wants little or nothing to do with Garret, and I find his attempts to get away rather comical. He even protests, "Can't I even put up a fuss?" 2. We are prepared for the singing when Garret begins to chase Sinatra at the beginning. The orchestra music build in the background. Any fan of musicals knows what that means!
  7. 1. The first movie I remember seeing Judy Garland in is "The Wizard of Oz". I remember being so scared of the tornado scene when I was young that I would hide my head under a blanket until it was over. I also had a special connection to her because we had a Cairn Terrier (like Toto) when I was younger. I remember thinking how brave Dorothy was, especially when she melts the witch at the end. 2. The two clips, especially the "Easter Parade" one, reminded me how very funny Judy was! I had seen both clips before but had forgotten. 3. My favorite Judy Garland movie is "Meet Me In St Louis." In that film, she seems to transition from child to adult. I've always loved the scene where she sings to Tootie, then tries to reassure her that everything will be fine when they move to New York. (It's clear, though, that Esther is trying to convince herself of the same thing.)
  8. 1. Flags are everywhere in the first scene. Also, as Cagney climbs the stairs, there are several portraits of former American presidents. The parade and flags at the end of the clip also help to promote American values. 2. I think the conversation between Cohen and the butler (talking about the "Grand Old Flag" as they climb the stairs) is the best example. The parade scene also no doubt boosted American morale. 3. The Oval Office scene is a better introduction. The audience can see the pictures of former presidents on the wall, which helped foster a sense of nationalism. The parade scene, with marching bands and flags, fits better after the introduction. Again, national pride is the main focus.
  9. 1. I do not see it as a "Battle of the Sexes". Each dancer is talented. I don't think they are in competition with one another. 2. Roger's character is the first I have seen this week who wasn't in need of "rescuing." She is a strong person on her own and doesn't need a man to complete of "save" her. 3. Roles for women in America were changing at this time. They had to enter the workforce in order to help support their families.
  10. 1. One prop in particular-the garter-tells the audience a lot about Alfred (mostly that he is a playboy.) Also, most of the French dialogue is not translated. The audience is left to draw its own conclusions as to what's going on. 2. Most of the French dialogue is not translated. The audience is left to draw its own conclusions as to what's going on. This keeps the audience engaged. 3. I expect the themes of love/relationships in other Depression-era musicals.
  11. 1. In the first clip, it's obvious that they are attracted to each other, although they try to hide it at first. MacDonald's character seems honored that he made up a song about her (then hurt when he admits he could have used any name to fit the girl he was with at the time. In the second clip, she seems embarrassed that he has seen her singing in such an establishment, and he is embarrassed also. It is clear that they care very much for each other. 2. I have not seen any other films with MacDonald or Eddy. 3. Male/female relationships in films of the era adhere to the strict moral code. There is no physical contact between the main characters.) Males are depicted as strong and brave (It is Eddy, not MacDonald, rowing the boat in the first clip.) Females, on the other hand, are seen as the "weaker" characters, those that need to be "rescued".
  12. 1. I agree that this shows a brighter perspective of life at that time. The music and lyrics are happy and light. It must have provided audiences a welcome escape from the harsh realities of the depression. 2. The themes of wealth/money and status are evident in this clip. I expect them to be recurring themes in other Depression era musicals as well. 3. If this had been pre-code, the singer would have finished undressing (rather than just taking her hat off). Other than that, I don't think it would have been much different.

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