Libby Cleary

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  1. The changes in male representation is that there is not an alpha male in the 60s era, I noticed in the second clip that the females are more alpha and the males are more beta. The men do not dominate roles. In the first clip, Robert Preston is singing and talking fast about a social problem and it captures everyone's attention. He begins talking to one person, then the crowd joins in.
  2. The setting of the scene is vaudeville and looks backwards to child stars, such as Shirley Temple and a young Judy Garland, which vaudeville was the beginning of musicals. Mama Rose barges in during the performance and she wants her daughters to do it the way she wants it done or she doesn't want them to perform at all. At the beginning, the song "Let Me Entertain You" sounds like a child's song, then we find out later that it is really about the stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, who was known for her striptease acts and was also an actress.
  3. The use of a ballet scene was fantasy so it is a less stylized scene that and I don't think it is necessary to change anything. Kelly is only unlikeable when he insults a woman and tells her to go away because he doesn't want to hear her opinion of his work.
  4. The pre-dance movements of Kelly and O'Connor are synchronized and act as a song opening. The Professor is the one who is teaching the two of them and the Professor is serious about what he is doing and wants it to be done his way. The Professor is very serious, Kelly is the person who stands out, and O'Connor is the one who is joking around and mocking the Professor.
  5. This musical is different from other musicals because the women are usually dressing and wearing dresses or something else that stands out. I haven’t seen other Doris Day musicals. Even though she is a tomboy, her personality adds to her character.
  6. In the clip, the actors’ costumes are all blended in and each of them is participating in the musical numbers and no one is leading any parts, as the numbers are synchronized. All the men wore business-like suits.
  7. Petunia is married to Joe and it's in their wedding vows that they must love each in sickness and in health, until death do them part. She thanks the Lord that he is alive and when she goes to the bedside and sings to him and also when she sings outside, this lets the audience know that she has devoted his life to her. If Petunia had been singing to her child, it would have not been that much different than singing to her husband, because her purpose is to love and protect the people with all her heart. The blacks aren't much different from other races because the blacks have struggles too. This film is important to the World War II era because of the discrimination against the blacks and their struggle to end it and the hatred of other races against them, especially the whites.
  8. Garrett is the person who is trying to attract Frank Sinatra. When he is trying to get away from her, you know the female is going to follow him until he pays attention to her. When she is near him and he backs away, the audience knows she is going to start to sing sooner or later. Also Frank Sinatra slides down the banister in one scene of the clip and Garrett catches him. The song she sings is saying that "love is fate" and he can't escape it.
  9. The only Judy Garland film I have watched is The Wizard of Oz and my impression of Judy Garland was that she was a talented singer. After watching the two clips, my impression of her was that she related to the people she worked with and she did a great job on the piano in the second clip and I also thought she was a godo dancer and how she followed Gene Kelly’s steps perfectly. I haven’t seen any of her other films, but I will get to as I go along.
  10. The parade scene was used to promote American values during World War II. The setting of the film is in the White House with FDR. In the parade scene, people are waving American flags and Cohan was talking about how patriotic his father was, never missing any parades or any of his shows. In the Oval Office, there are photographs of ships, signifying the war. The opening scene of the movie lets us know how important it is to reflect on Cohan’s patriotic life. If the parade scene had opened Yankee Doodle Dandy, it might have been a foreshadow.
  11. In the film Top Hat, the battle of the sexes as indicated in the clip show Fred Astaire starting to dance first. Ginger Rogers is at first reluctant to join in, but follows his steps after his. This film is distinguished from other Depression era musical discussed because the places are familiar and so are the characters, but the sound is different from other films we have discussed because in this film, Rogers is following Astaire's steps, and the music is synchronized with their dancing. In Top Hat, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are in an intimate relationship, and after the dancing, their relationship goes further and they later go on to get married in the film. The difference is that their relationship is more based on love than sexuality.
  12. The Lubitsch touch is visual storytelling, which allows the audience to see what is going on. Alfred is speaking very fast in some scenes, and it might be because he is panicky or afraid. The female character has a drawer on revolvers and she turns one of them on herself because she has been caught cheating on her husband, but she was just "playing dead." The scene's sound uses Alfred's dialogue, which is translated from French to English and he is speaking rapidly. There are low violin chords in the background, which suggests a suspenseful scene and makes the audience wonder what is going to happen next. The themes and approaches of the scene are light-hearted, comical, and at times suspenseful.
  13. In the two scenes, the two characters seem “distanced” from each other, although they are attracted to one another. In the canoe scene, MacDonald keeps her back to Eddy and seems shy at first, but when he starts to sing, she smiles and acknowledges it and mocks him. She keeps his back to him a lot, and both of the characters do not make lots of eye contact. Eddy tries to get the female character out of her shell by singing and tries to let her know he wants her attraction too. In the second scene, the female character is nervous about singing in front of all the people and seems to want to leave. in the two scenes, there is no “over the top” advances that the two characters make physically and the code seems to follow good courtship, as the man is pursuing the woman. The norm of the production code is making sure that the two characters are not going too far as to what they are doing in the two scenes.
  14. I agree that the clip I watched exhibits a brighter perspective of life than in the real life because in 1929, the Great Depression was going on. The approaches that I feel from the clip is that the characters do not seem to be interested in money, and they are joking around and don't seem to have a care in the world. If the film had been pre-code, Held's dress would have been more modest-looking and smaller.

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