Cmmarion612

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  1. Terrible we can’t buy any larger class shirts than small. What’s up with that?😞
  2. Robert Prestons roles in his earlier non-musical films were strictly masculine and asexual. He personified the cowboy who gets the girl or the grittiest of bad guys who do anything for money by betraying friends and women yet still even with his first movie showed how a quality, professional actor can do more than just read lines or sing songs. He makes you actually enjoy or root for his character and the bad guys.
  3. This ensemble is a great depiction of an easy going and light hearted musical that sets the tone for the movie. Not just one person is the center of attention, everyone is apart of the act. The men are dressed somewhat casual and the woman is in a nice simple dress. It points out every persons attribute and exemplifies the nations ideals and beliefs of the day.
  4. My first Garland experience was her as a “droop” in Andy Hardy. She was the neighbor who was a little girl to Hardy but she was so infatuated with him, she would and did anything for him. Helping him through every dilemma, hoping for him to notice her but just getting the “friends “ feeling from him. She was definitely the more mature character. Even at that young age she showed such poise and spirit. It was so very obvious that she was going to be a star.
  5. When Cohen enters the Oval Office, pictures on the wall are all of ships. I believe that war bonds are trying to be sold to build ships. Being born on the Fourth of July was the reason why Cohen was so enthusiastic about showing audiences how important patriotism was to him and how it should be for America.
  6. I absolutely enjoy Leslie Caron and her tap and dancing styles. When she teams up with Astaire it is amazing. I just wish we could talk more about her films also.
  7. Cmmarion612

    Cagney in Footlight Parade

    It’s so amazing to me how probably 90% of the eras actors were triple threats; sing, dance and especially act. Cagney did it all with charisma, grit and the coolest attitude. I love his tap style and his routines were amazing. It’s so great to see guys like him and Stewart singing and dancing when most of their films were drama. The choreography and cinematography in “Footlight Parade” was fascinating in the final three prologue sequences. The stage with the moving floor depicting the depression and the soldiers etc. I am so glad that this movie was highlighted and also his movie “Yankee Doodle Dandy” were he depicted the amazing life of George M Cohen I believe should be commended as well for showing the wonderful talent of Cagney also. I sincerely hope this movie will be in TCMs lineup as well. It really shows his triple threat chops, I believe in a greater fashion.
  8. What a fantastic clip. I absolutely love this movie. You can see what kind of character Chevalier plays, adulterer, frivolous fun loving etc. One part in the scene that, for me expresses the character he plays. When trying to zip up her dress the husband is having a difficult time and then she walks over and his character is finished with the task in a second; “voila!”. Also when he puts the prop gun into the drawer and there are numerous others, it’s plain to see what kind of a life and character he is playing. Simply great! The Lubitsch “touch” is beautiful and shows a fun loving quirkiness about the movie, from the garter to the gun. His sense of minute detail shows the style and knowledge he has as to what will make the audience enjoy the film. The flow of his movies are so effortlessly perceived and makes for an escape anyone can take part and enjoy during those tough depression years. I can’t wait to see the next film he masters in the lineup.
  9. CANT WAIT TO BINGE WATCH MUSICALS NOW TODAY AND THURSDAY!! SO EXCITED TO GET STARTED.
  10. In both clips, interest between the two is obvious and in the canoe Eddy tries using comedy to try and show he is not shy and attracted. Pushing him away in Jeanette character seems to be the dialogue for the film. It’s obvious that before the code, sexism and the way it was shown was widely more dramatic and crass. In the saloon scene, the embarrassment shown on Janeattes face is a perfect example of the romance between the two and how sorry Eddys character feels for hers The studios portrayal of women’s role in society is drastically different than from even ten years later. How hard it was for any woman, regardless of class, was difficult yet acceptable by society and was often the norm surrounding the publics perspective. I sadly understand now how hard it must have been for any female in show business to be and stay accepted. To gloss over what was really going on during the depression was obviously a standard and driving force for most studios to try and convey life as a fantasy and how times could be pushed aside by going to the theater.
  11. I absolutely agree that in depression times every aspect of daily life was made to be light hearted and happy to take people away from the hard times that were going on in the early 30’s. Life was hard on everyone so to make a movie consisting of fairy tale outcomes, in a sense, was the norm for studios to convey to the audience. In Ziegfeld and Billings characters, the sense of light hearted dialogue between the two was obviously clear across the real spectrum of cut throat big business, particularly show business in the golden age. I absolutely enjoy every film William Powell has acted in so it’s hard for me to be a real critic but this movie envokes every sense of studios trying to create an escape for their audience.

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