mns35

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About mns35

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  1. I think that if "People" had been filmed as a "BIG" production number, it would have taken away the intimacy of the words and how Fanny is really expressing her inner thoughts. She is portrayed as a shy, almost frightened person. Nicky doesn't really come too close to her in the scene. He is like the rest of the audience, watching and listening. The blocking of the scene makes us look at Fanny. She keeps moving away from Nicky until she is on the steps above him and the street and well frankly, anytime Barbra sings that song (as herself or as Fanny), you have to watch her and just absorb the words.
  2. Rose's entrance is big and brash, just the way she wants people to think of her. While she believes that she is doing it all for her children, especially Baby June, it is obvious that she wants the spotlight to focus on her. The other stage mothers are waiting in the wings but Rose makes sure that by entering late and by shouting orders to all around her, all eyes are on her. The only person who may not realize it at that point is June who believe that she is the "Star!"
  3. First of all, "Singin' in the Rain" has been my favorite musical film for most of my life. Watching the pre-dance movements between Kelly and O'Connor you can just feel them building up to the beginnings of a song and dance. They both make the movements look so effortless. The steps seem to flow out of their bodies. This is the reason why I never noticed the professor's reactions before until today. The poor man looks absolutely shell-shocked throughout the entire scene, which makes him a perfect foil for the constant activity around him.
  4. Like most other people, my first Judy Garland film was The Wizard of Oz. To this day, I can not imagine anyone else being Dorothy. You can feel the wonder that Dorothy experiences in trying to find happiness in Kansas, that grows as she travels through Oz and knows that she truly belongs back on the farm. In watching her performances in the two clips, I am struck by the fact that she commands the screen over both Astaire and Kelly. She is more than able keep up with the dance steps AND continue to react to the song lyrics. As to her later performances, I like a Star is Born. She shows such strength and caring for Norman's weaknesses that your heart breaks along with hers. Curiously, I remember reading that in real life, she was falling apart emotionally while filming this movie, which makes it even more bittersweet to watch.
  5. I see Fred and Ginger as equals in this dance number, as opposed to the traditional Male leading his partner routine. They seem to approach the dance in a playful, joyful experience, each leading and challenging the other through the steps. The movements are athletic and graceful, as well as sophisticated. It shows how the movie musical has begun to grow and feel more comfortable with itself.
  6. I think this movie showcases the charming 'rouge' personality that Chevalier portrayed so well over the years. I was amused to see the calm look on his face as he added the pistol to his collection of past conquests and as madame walks over to him for help in fastening her dress. Sound is almost an extra in this scene. It enhances the action but was not really necessary. I look forward to watching the film in its entirety.
  7. It is interesting to watch the attraction between the two main characters being mild and very restrained. McDonald tries her best not to look at Eddy as he is singing to her in the first clip and just watching her perform in the second. There is no physical touching between the two in the canoe scene, however he is happily shaking hands and linking arms with all the other characters in the saloon. Is it permissible to touch 'loose women' but not 'good girls' in these post-code movies? I have not seen any of the McDonald - Eddy movies but have seen many stills and short clips from their films. It was very rare to see them looking at each other, even during love songs. Again, is this post-code conduct that was expected in films?
  8. As with many of the depression-era musicals, the portrayal of life is dreamy and carefree. Anna Held seems to float through her daily performance and back-stage business as if there were no problems for her concerns. If you consider that people during that time period were jobless, hungry, and homeless, it is strange to see a lady being blasé about very expensive flowers in her dressing room and the fact that producers are lining up to offer her jobs. The music in this clip is so light and joyous. It is such a contradiction to the sadness that was actually happening throughout the world. It was probably a wonderful distraction to the woes the audience members were experiencing, but watching and listening to it now is almost surreal to me. I have to watch the entire film to see if I still feel that way.

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