Classic_Girl

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  1. 1. It would have not helped display the character's sensitive personality. This is an intimate moment. 2. They are both deprived of a meaningful relationship for their own reasons. His lifestyle doesn't really allow him to commit and she's embarrassed of the attraction. They look at each other and he responds to her song by walking behind her with a smile. 3. They start the scene on the same frame but then the camera is on her when she starts singing. Then we see him following her with the camera on his back and focused on her. As the song progresses the camera is only on her then by the end there's a distance between them.
  2. 1. In both films we see a woman being dominated by the male around the same era and she has a breaking point. Except in Gaslight he is plain evil. The use of shadows is similar. 2. Cukor supports the actors with lighting. At first she's sad in the shadow then the light is on her face when she has the emotional outburst. He seems unaware of her feelings and then tries to make it better. Who says no to chocolate? Cukor puts them both in the same frame making their dialogue flow smoothly without cuts. 3. There is enough trust for her to speak up and he responds by showing that he cares and tries to make it better.
  3. 1. During the code era we see Fred and Ginger and men going to war and a lot patriotism in musicals. There was usually an Alpha Male and individualism was suspicious. 2. I can see individualism in both characters. 3. I don't recall seeing him in other movies except for the Music Man. A classic!
  4. 1. It looks back to backstage musicals. It looks ahead at the change in entertainment because now is directed to a younger audience instead of families and they don't want that kind of show anymore. 2. Rosalind Russell knew her way on stage. She walks in like she owns the stage and yells to her daughter to sing louder. She's so persistent selling her girls, she's not walking out unless they are in the show. 3. Baby June is the main attraction here. She's innocent and a great dancer while Louise doesn't have that kind of talent. She's sucking her thumb indicating her innocence at this point of the story. In this number they are innocent but later on the lyrics change from "let" me entertain you to "make" me entertain you when a grownup Louise sings making the number enticing. It's important to see the contrast between the innocence of Baby June and grown up Louise. I think this contrast shows the change to come in show business from innocent family oriented to more suggestive and edgy for the young audience.
  5. 1. It creates the contrast between reality and fantasy. In this scene we see a normal down to earth artist that is doing what he likes no matter what anyone thinks. His paintings match with the background (soft colors of streets and buildings are the same on his paintings) making them not remarkable. 2. I think he is honest and not used to the attention. He knows the college girl is not really an intellectual, anything she says she overheard. He can't believe the rich lady is interested in his paintings and their value. I think he is likable for being just a normal guy without pretense.
  6. 1. When O'Connor starts teasing the professor little by little Kelly joins in until every action teasing him is synchronized, then when they're using their hands to tap on the the table they immediately start tap dancing. 2. His role is to stay serious and he shows he is offended. Although Kelly is taking the class seriously at first he joins in when O'Connor starts making fun of the professor. 3. The professor is eccentric and has an air of superiority making him look not very masculine, Kelly is the Alpha male here and O'Connor the fun friend guy.
  7. 1. Calamity Jane is different because she's a tomboy. She doesn't dress or act feminine and wants to be treated as an equal. That is what makes her character so funny. 2. Doris Day played the typical girl next door of her era in previous films. In Calamity Jane she proves to be able to play a character that behaves different than the norm but she is still a natural actress. In the second clip she sounds more sweet like the real Doris. She's able to play different roles and still be herself. That's what makes her such a great actress. 3. Her bright and sunny persona adds to the character of Jane because deep inside she has the feelings of a girl and the sweetness of a girl and all she needs is a little help to get to the point where she can actually have a romantic relationship with Bill instead of fighting him. Doris Day was able to show the transformation and how recognizing she's in love brings out her soft side. And that is close to the real Jane.
  8. 1. At first they are trying to convince Tony who is quickly convinced and joins in with all the ideas for a show based on real life events. The difference is than the four of them are working together, they have an equal part on this number. 2. They are wearing their regular clothes. 3. They are friends and they have knowledge of show business and play little parts and use props. They are working as a team to come up with a show.
  9. 1. She's a devoted woman. Her prayers have been answered and she has no words, she's so grateful and happy, it's a miracle he's alive. She can't be happier that her love is with her and her devotion to him is clear. She's there for him. She's happy hanging clothes and checking on him. She loves him so much that even holding his shirt gives her joy. 2. If the song was about her child it would be different because a mother/child relationship is more permanent. A mother doesn't wonder if her child loves her. Even when the child grows up and flies out of the nest their relationship continues. Not the case with a romantic relationship. 3. What a beautiful collaboration when black Americans were enlisted and to see that everyone was united and working together no matter their differences.
  10. 1. He's totally unaware coming out playing with a baseball, she's planning to see him by waiting for him to come out. She's not letting him get away so she blocks him, he gets scared and starts running away, she persists by following him with that predatory look. As she runs after him the music helps make this scene more exciting. She takes control by stoping him "Hey!" then she begins the song asking him to stop stalling and playing with her then the ball is used for the metaphor. And the sound effects are very precise with the music and the sound of ball landing (all this awesome job done by Blanche Sewell) Then she begins her convincing argument that no matter where he goes somehow they'll end up together because is their fate. He uses body language to show he doesn't agree and walks away backwards to get away from her but she's aggressive and he's trapped between her and the wall. The sounds effects help again with the knocking sounds. He gets away and she grabs his arm. He begins to listen and then she forces a hug. Looks like he's falling for it but then he says no. He pushes, she grabs him by the ear. The chase begins again up the stairs and the music adds to the excitement. He's so desperate to get away he's willing to jump over the wall. She grabs him, makes him seat, he gets away, then she grabs his coat and now he finally gets to "speak" saying doesn't matter what sign while she teases him. Again makes him seat and quickly seats on his lap. (She's aggressive!) Looks like he's falling for it again, he's dancing along. She shakes his hand so hard then he's getting away again, she's not letting him go! she grabs his hat. Finally picks him up and carries him over her shoulders while dancing a little with the song. He gets away and slides down the rail. She runs down the stairs to catch him. He can't get away! 2. This sequence prepare us for the musical number by letting us see that she's chasing him.
  11. 1. The first Judy Garland movie I recall watching was The Wizard of Oz. I thought she had the most beautiful voice. Nobody can sing like Judy. 2. I can see she was a great comedienne and it is easy to look at her more. She's very funny. And in the second one she's very natural and is able to multitask. She shows more maturity and is very involved with Gene Kelly. 3. I like her in Meet Me in St. Louis, every song is fantastic. It's a film that forms part of my family tradition, specially around the holidays. I'm very glad she changed the lyrics of "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" from depressing to giving hope. I believe that's why is a classic. I also love her performing "Get Happy" in Summer Stock. Songs that once you think about them get stuck in your head. She was such a great performer, like no one else. I can't understand why the studio doctors put her on drugs. She had such a great gift. We lost her way too soon.
  12. 1. The scene promotes American values like love for family and patriotism. We see the White House, the President, the flags, and the military. 2. Shows and parades boost the American morale and this is evident in the dialogue when Mr. Cohan says he's "always carrying a flag in a parade or following one" and he mentions the Civil War and the president says his family have been giving shows all over 47 states in this great country. Then the story begins with the 4th of July parade and a show. 3. It would've been different because of the fact that he ends up talking to the president in the White House is proof that his work has helped Americans and he's given this honor. This is not just about a family giving a variety show but what it means to the people, how it boosts their morale.
  13. I love Fred and Ginger movies. Top Hat is so entertaining. There's a very funny scene that makes me laugh every time when her friend is cheering for her (right before "Cheek to Cheek") and Dale is shocked because she thinks is her husband. Both females in this film are strong independent and sure of themselves. In the clip of "Isn't it a Lovely Day" she is not very willing to let him in but then when they are dancing in harmony she likes him. There's a little detail I noticed this time that probably makes it different from other movies. Some scenes end with the beginning of a tune or rhythm that continues on the next scene. That's a smooth transition that keeps the audience interested. And the Picolino number with the ribbons reminds me of a number in The Great Ziegfeld. Is that Lucille Ball? (The florist girl)
  14. 1. I notice the Lubitsch touch when Alfred breaks the fourth wall saying "She's terribly jealous" and she comes out of the room furious about the garter, he tries to get out of the mess by telling her is hers and she shows her legs to show is not hers. The camera moves to the door and now he breaks the fourth wall again and tell us "her husband!" After she tries to kill herself with the gun and her husband tries to kill him and then realize the gun wasn't loaded the husband goes to her and hugs her shaking her bosom to add humor. Alfred puts the gun inside a drawer where he keeps a collection. Then her husband can't hook her dress but of course Alfred is an expert. Alfred is a womanizer. It's confirmed when he's told about his scandals and to go back to Sylvania. 2. Some of the things I noticed on this scene: the gun shot sounds, the use of music to add intensity, the sound of conversations behind closed doors or when he opens the balcony door and then shuts off the sound of people talking by closing it. I also notice perhaps the use of pre-recorded sound for the drawer close up because you can hear the background conversation. 3. The use of visuals to tell the story and the use of music to add intensity to the scenes.
  15. In the first scene she's playing hard to get and makes fun of him because he's been singing the same song to other girls (like that's his line) and in the second scene she shows her vulnerability and their eyes meet and you can tell how much he likes her. He's doing the chasing.

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