LJHUFF

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  1. 1. How might Streisand’s performance of the song “People” have felt different in the film, had she been more theatrical and expressive, perhaps even belting her song more? To me the reflective nature about what she is feeling would be lost. 2. Note the emotional transition moments in this scene: how do the two characters relate to each other as the lyrics are sung? There is a lot of physical distance between them. She is guarded by posts and stairs perhaps a representation of how she is guarding her heart as she thinks about pursuing the relationship further. She appears to be reflective…he listens intently and doesn’t take his eyes off of her. 3. How does the direction and editing of this scene support Streisand’s performance? Be specific about blocking, reaction shots, etc. The direction and editing go hand in hand with my comment above about the emotional transition moments…physical distance, the use of posts and stairs, break away shots to see he is still looking and listening.
  2. 1. Explore any common themes and filmmaking techniques in a very different movie also directed by George Cukor, Gaslight. (If you are not familiar with Gaslight, compare and contrast Cukor's theme in this scene and his techniques with another musical you have seen during this course) Cukor uses lavish settings for both films. Dominant male images are portrayed in both. . Things people will endure for love or money is an underlying theme.. How others can take advantage of an individual is clear. Outside influences often make a huge difference in potentially/seemingly rough situations (ie: Colonel Pickering and the young boy/now a man who knew the grandmother in gaslight) Note the emotional transition moments in this scene, how the actors portray them, and how Cukor supports them. Cukor focuses in on the overwhelming emotional outbursts of the women in both films …and especially in this clip…the insanity one can temporarily experience when the mind is taxed is clearly shown. Insanity= exasperation, frustration, etc. Higgins and Doolittle both are given opportunity to show “their side” of what is happening in the story. 2. What do you notice about the relationship between Eliza and Higgins that seems enhanced by Cukor’s direction Higgins has come a long way from his first encounters with Eliza even though he still lacks understanding as to WHY she is upset his responses and reactions still seem gentler than before. Eliza has come a long way from her first encounters with Higgins. She acknowledges that SHE is the point of it all and wants recognition for her major accomplishments. Cukor set the stage perfectly for us to see the growth of the individuals.
  3. 1. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? The masculine performances become more believable. The masculine performances open up the circle of relatability to multiple people groups of both genders. 2. What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? He is so comfortable in his own skin! He is in command of the whole stage…the whole room (or park) is his stage. He is fearless with his audience. He draws all attention to himself! 3 .Have you seen any Robert Preston films that are not musicals? If so, what do you notice about his characters and his approach to acting, now that you are more aware of his dedication to working his craft outside of his stage or film work? The roles Preston played, that came to mind most easily, were those he had played in musicals. I did have to research the lists for movies I may have seen in which Robert Preston had acted. I remembered seeing the movie “How the West Was Won” but was hard pressed to recall his role and unfortunately had to refresh my memory. Then, it was “Äh! Yes!” While my statements are true it does not mean Robert Preston is in any way unmemorable! It does mean that other roles he played left an indelible impression. No matter which role…one that came to my memory easily or not…Preston comes across as a “man’s man”. This of course, in some instances, a play on words! While playing The Wagon Master “Roger Morgan” in the movie “How the West Was Won” he is strong, a true leader, capable of handling any problem situation, an example for other men to live up to…fulfilling the traditional interpretation of the phrase “ä man’s man”. While playing “Toddy” in the movie “Victor Victoria” he plays the part of Count Grazinski’s (Julie Andrews) boyfriend…a “man’s” man. I have rarely laughed as hard, at any scene, than I did at Preston’s performance of “The Shady Dame from Seville”. What acting! It seems Preston is willing to do whatever it takes to get his character across to the audience!
  4. 1. Does a movie that has as stylized a scene as An American in Paris’ ending ballet need to use a less-than-realistic, stylized approach throughout the film? For continuity’s sake…no…for emphasis… yes 2. What keeps Jerry Mulligan from being completely unlikeable in a scene in which he acts pretty darn unlikeable? For me it is the fact he is being true to himself as is revealed in the scene a little later. At first it seems he is cocky and self- absorbed but then he hasn’t even thought about the price of his work…it’s possible he was in doubt of any one purchasing…considering how he feels about the quality of work he is producing… humble enough to know more is required.
  5. 1. How do the pre-dance movements of O’Connor and Kelly compare to their actual dance movements? Everything from eye movements that are in perfect rhythm, to head nods hand claps, shoulder shrugs and turn arounds…ALL are perfectly synchronized like the actual dance movements…add to the humor of the moment and prep us for the dance sequence. 2. Watch the Professor all the way through and consider the role of the straight man. The professor is such a good sport. He allows himself to be subject to anything Kelly and O’ Çonnor dish out. It is fun to see him respond to the positive feedback from O’Connor. He then becomes an audience of one and reluctant participant. The professor is what makes the scene truly funny (along with O’Connors facial expressions) 3. How do the representations of masculinity in all three men compare and contrast with each other? The professor has a quiet strength and gentle dignity. Kelly and O’Connor are exuberant and athletic. Their masculinity does not seem to be in competition in this clip.
  6. As you reflect upon female representation in the 1950s, where do you think this film character falls in the continuum? Why? This character, Calamity Jane, ranks high in representing strength, a woman’s ability to do the things traditionally handled by men, and make changes to better her own life without compromising her ability to help others. How do you think Doris Day grows as an actress in her various roles in the 1950s, before and after this musical? Doris Day managed to keep it real, keep it cute, and keep it fun. She was able to go from glamour to goop in a moment, from romantic to ridiculous in a heartbeat, and from serious to slapstick without a seam! She was an incredible actress. She grew as an actress right before our eyes mastering the subtle nuances needed to move from one type of scene to another, never letting her comedic side conceal the fact she was a “normal” woman with every day struggles…like how to be glamorous after ratting around with the children or dog ( in “don’t eat the daisies”) or the fact she had real level of intelligence in spite of the wacky things that keep happening and the false impressions people were left with because of them (lie in “The Glass Bottomed Boat”) Does Doris Day’s bright and sunny persona add or detract from the role of Calamity Jane in your opinion? Please defend your answer. It is my opinion her bright and sunny persona ADDED to the role of Calamity Jane. One of the things that goes hand in hand with this type of persona is the ability to laugh at one’s self…to laugh with others at life’s calamities without being hurt by the laughter. I don’t think it’s a coincidence the dialogue in this scene at the bar ends with Calamity Jane ACTUALLY saying “ ‘taint sa funny” . She isn’t saying falling on her rear wasn’t funny at all…she was able to agree the fall was funny, turn around to the bar…still hold her own as “one of the guys” and enjoy that sasparilly! I am sure this was one of her life’s attitudes. Also, she was able to reign in her persona to meet the need of the moment. She couldn’t be more demure and alluring than when singing with Keel on that wagon on the way to the dance or while singing “secret love”.
  7. Daily dose #9 1. As you watch the interaction between the four characters in this scene, what do you notice about the way they include each other or relate to one another? How is it different from early musicals we have discussed? Encouragement is the key word that comes to mind. Each is encouraging the other to share their ideas for a show and each gives the impression no idea is too small or dumb. Saying, Come on! Come along! When we put our heads together…look how easily we create something! I love how they build on each other’s idea to create a better story. They dance together as if they have for years. So many of the earlier musicals highlighted the individual actor and highlighted the strengths of the individual… Here it is a focus on the group of actors who are depending on each other. They even laugh at the friendly competition of who gets that foot forward first. 2. What do you notice about the costuming of the characters that indicate cohesiveness of the ensemble, as opposed to setting anyone apart? Be specific The costumes are simple. No one costume draws more attention than the other. The costumes all seem “every day” in their nature. Business suits, leisure suit, day dress… 3.What do you notice about the staging and interplay between the characters that helps define the relationships between the characters in the song? As they throw their ideas out there they look closely at the others faces to see what the response is. I think part of the beauty here is each one of them KNOWS their place and fills it as though it HAD been planned
  8. 1. Thinking like a director and editor, describe how each shot spotlights key action. The empty bleachers provided multiple opportunities for Sinatra to be “backed into a corner”. The viewer had plenty of time to absorb the personal battle of compliance vs resistance Sinatra portrayed (even though the scene is fast paced) because of the shot sequences…he’s cornered here…there is singing…he is cornered there…there is singing. 2. It’s interesting to examine how musicals segue into musical numbers. How does this sequence prepare us for the singing. I find it is the MUSIC that preps us for the singing sequences as much as anything. The musical score reminds me of what you might hear in a cartoon. It was like sneaky little tip toes! Add to that the back and forth dance steps of avoidance and we are all set for what is going to ensue. The empty bleachers become the stage and the “chase” begins…the timing of the music being the highest indicator of the pace the actors will take. Usually the soloist will lead and the musicians follow…in this instance it seemed to be, to me, the opposite. There was an air of anticipation created by the music.
  9. 1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? The first Judy Garland film, for me, was “The Wizard of Oz”. I was in my twenties before the film aired at a day and time I could view it. From her first note of “Over the rainbow” I was utterly and completely slayed. I could hardly believe the sweet intonations, and clarity of her voice. I knew her voice was a gift to us all! Her voice was one with which I could blend and harmonize which made it so personal. To this day I prefer her performances where she sings with the same sweetness and gentleness. She can surely belt out any song…however, I love the sweeter side! 2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? I always catch myself listening for that sweet quality to Garland’s voice which first captured my attention in “The Wizard of Oz” and I’m happy to say it was there in both of these clips. Her vibrato continues to change as she matures but she maintains beautiful control. As an example, in the clip from “The Easter Parade” she quavers just a little bit of the devilishness she is portraying as she sings the word cad. It made me grin! Additionally, during the dance routines you can see she is as light as a feather. She is a wonderful dancer…bright and I just want to keep watching her so I won’t miss any of her facial expressions! With Astaire it was obvious they had to be careful she didn’t go flying! What a privilege it was for both Garland and Kelly to dance together in “For Me and My Gal”…they are matched perfectly and, for me, it just seemed to be so much fun! There is a lilt to her laugh. In previous films I thought her performances to be much more forced…not so here…she was natural and believable. Neither of these clips truly capture the beauty of her face like was done in “Meet me in St Louis”. 3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? From the Movie: “A Star is Born” with the song “The Man that Got Away”…I chose this example because she opens up the relatability of the audience. She evokes understanding and empathy through telling us what has happened, how she feels about it, what is happening now and what the end result is…all through lyrics (and a believable performance).
  10. 1. What was the first Judy Garland film you recall watching? What was your first impression of her? The first Judy Garland film, for me, was “The Wizard of Oz”. I was in my twenties before the film aired at a day and time I could view it. From her first note of “Over the rainbow” I was utterly and completely slayed. I could hardly believe the sweet intonations, and clarity of her voice. I knew her voice was a gift to us all! Her voice was one with which I could blend and harmonize which made it so personal. To this day I prefer her performances where she sings with the same sweetness and gentleness. She can surely belt out any song…however, I love the sweeter side! 2. How do you view her differently after viewing these clips than you might have viewed her previously? I always catch myself listening for that sweet quality to Garland’s voice which first captured my attention in “The Wizard of Oz” and I’m happy to say it was there in both of these clips. Her vibrato continues to change as she matures but she maintains beautiful control. As an example, in the clip from “The Easter Parade” she quavers just a little bit of the devilishness she is portraying as she sings the word cad. It made me grin! Additionally, during the dance routines you can see she is as light as a feather. She is a wonderful dancer…bright and I just want to keep watching her so I won’t miss any of her facial expressions! With Astaire it was obvious they had to be careful she didn’t go flying! What a privilege it was for both Garland and Kelly to dance together in “For Me and My Gal”…they are matched perfectly and, for me, it just seemed to be so much fun! There is a lilt to her laugh. In previous films I thought her performances to be much more forced…not so here…she was natural and believable. Neither of these clips truly capture the beauty of her face like was done in “Meet me in St Louis”. 3. What films in her later career come to mind as examples of her increasing ability to capture an audience’s imagination as a storyteller when she sings a lyric? From the Movie: “A Star is Born” with the song “The man that Got Away”…I chose this example because she opens up the relatability of the audience. She evokes understanding and empathy through telling us what has happened, how she feels about it, what is happening now and what the end result is…all through lyrics (and a believable performance).
  11. Daily dose #14 1. As you look back to the masculine performances in musicals of past decades, what changes in male representation, and performance would you say are most noticeable? The masculine performances become more believable. The masculine performances open up the circle of relatability to multiple people groups of both genders. 2. What other specific qualities do you notice about Robert Preston in either or both of these clips? He is so comfortable in his own skin! He is in command of the whole stage…the whole room (or park) is his stage. He is fearless with his audience. He draws all attention to himself! 3 .Have you seen any Robert Preston films that are not musicals? If so, what do you notice about his characters and his approach to acting, now that you are more aware of his dedication to working his craft outside of his stage or film work? The roles Preston played, that came to mind most easily, were those he had played in musicals. I did have to research the lists for movies I may have seen in which Robert Preston had acted. I remembered seeing the movie “How the West Was Won” but was hard pressed to recall his role and unfortunately had to refresh my memory. Then, it was “Äh! Yes!” While my statements are true it does not mean Robert Preston is in any way unmemorable! It does mean that other roles he played left an indelible impression. No matter which role…one that came to my memory easily or not…Preston comes across as a “man’s man”. This of course, in some instances, a play on words! While playing The Wagon Master “Roger Morgan” in the movie “How the West Was Won” he is strong, a true leader, capable of handling any problem situation, an example for other men to live up to…fulfilling the traditional interpretation of the phrase “ä man’s man”. While playing “Toddy” in the movie “Victor Victoria” he plays the part of Count Grazinski’s (Julie Andrews) boyfriend…a “man’s” man. I have rarely laughed as hard, at any scene, than I did at Preston’s performance of “The Shady Dame from Seville”. What acting! It seems Preston is willing to do whatever it takes to get his character across to the audience!
  12. Daily Dose #5 1. Describe how the scenes in today’s Daily Dose were designed to promote American values for audiences during World War II. Be specific. Refer to props, set design, settings, etc. in your answer. The scenes in today’s daily Dose promote American values in several ways. First, there is a massive and wonderful display of known / completely recognizable American symbols of patriotism/freedom/unity (flags…on stands… and flags being waved by people of all ages, or flying high in the community…even a tiny one on Cohan’s lapel… and also red/white/blue buntings), liberty (lady liberty on the regimental flag), the importance of the military (historical portraits of past generals/presidents, battleships under glass and pictured on the walls…the nautical theme of décor in the presidents office), politics (the donkeys on the presidents desk), and American history (by all of the same). Second, when viewing the scenes from this clip, the story line promotes the importance of family over and over again. Beginning with the former president’s (Teddy Roosevelt) valet is on duty, when it wasn’t required, so he could see “George Washington Jr”) again and have the opportunity to share about the president singing “The Grand Old Flag” while in the bathtub…commenting the song is still great today…thus showing a long term influence of the Cohans as a cohesive and unified family. On to president FDR’s memory of seeing the Cohan family perform 30 years prior. Also, Cohan speaks of his patriotism as being inherited. It is a part of his family’s cultural heritage. The president comments on the patriotic strain of the “Irish Americans” as a strength of that group of people and Cohan uses this to lead to the story of his birth, sharing the WHY of his patriotic name and lifestyle. Third, we see multiple families at the parade. We also see the Cohans colleagues as being supportive and excited. Jerry Cohan is shown to be able to “do it all” by insisting on checking on and celebrating with wife and baby between meeting his responsibilities. 2. Listen carefully to the dialogue in these scenes. In what ways does the dialogue and/or the screenplay work to boost American morale? Quote specific lines of dialogue in your response. I see the dialogue boosting American morale in the following ways: · The president is listening to the American public…“I understood you knew all the answers.” · The president is aware of what is in the newspapers…”The Herald Tribune says you would make a better president.” · Be like Cohan…show you are proud to be an American…”You carry your country like a flag.” · The president is reinforcing the fact…”What a great country it is.” · Concerning our military… “Homecoming”… “They were optimistic, happy and” expectant.” 3. Since this is the opening of a biographical musical, how differently do you feel this film would be if it opened with the Fourth of July Parade scene in Providence, Rhode Island vs. the opening with FDR in the Oval Office? Defend your answer. It would seem that Cohan’s birth on the fourth of July would have been a logical place to begin this biographic film. However, we must keep in mind that the studio and film- makers had different or additional goals and a significantly different agenda in creating the musical. By beginning the film with the visit to the white house, we are set up as though we were beginning a real life conversation. To me this beginning is an invitation to gain insight to more than just the incredible life of Cohan as a showman, and a composer, but also that of a patriot and family man. It is also an invitation to visualize the dream of a determined man and learn how life molds us, as individuals, to accomplish the things our hearts and minds are open to. The parade scene is more a depiction than an invitation. When telling a story, it always makes a difference if it is presented with just the facts or told with the side lines and special parts that share human experience. Certain ways of telling a story can evoke emotions or passions. I believe this is a part of the film- makers purpose in beginning with the white house. We are involved from the first minute until the last. We are able to have complete empathy with each of the characters. We are able to follow the life patterns of Cohan and discover what it was that motivated or inspired him. The American values that need to be reinforced are. Cohan’s initial motivation to make money from his own compositions and his desire to have his name be renowned were excellent motivators for his determination and yet, even HE did not realize initially how far reaching his life's work would be or the depth of meaning his music would bring to the American people as a whole and globally. The movie does a great job of showing Cohan did not imagine receiving such high honor from his government. I feel the biggest differences in using the parade as a beginning for the film would have been accomplishing the reinforcement of American values and the level of audience involvement from start to finish.
  13. What do you notice about the Lubitsch touch? How do the props, the dialogue, and the staging help you understand the character of Alfred (Maurice Chevalier)? Wow! Once you know what you are looking for the Lubitsch Touch is easily discovered. The props and setting help me to understand the character of Alfred in many ways. As an example, the large picture on the wall of a woman scantily dressed and posed for pleasure indicates he enjoys beautiful women and isn’t inclined to mask this fact! The apartment is more ornate than one might expect for a gentleman’s home…glittering sconces, floor to ceiling doors with intricate design, wainscoting…one might expect a more masculine décor, but, the setting is arranged in many ways for the delight and comfort of women. The dialogue, though primarily in French is understood through implication and good acting…even for a person like me, with limited understanding of the actual language. We see the dress lifted to show garters in place, knees and legs to a man that we will later discover is NOT her husband...the argument is first heard distally from behind the bedroom door… The staging also helps me to understand the character of Albert! The scene opens serenely with a lovely room where a dog is quietly resting on a sofa…what is interesting is we begin to hear the argument (distal and behind closed doors) and the dog never stirs. As I reflect on the movie clip the dog’s LACK of reaction to anything that is going on is a high indicator that it is all too familiar with this type of happening. The dog is used to such things. This is another indicator of Albert's character. The ornate roll top desk is strategically placed so that the gun can be nonchalantly placed in a drawer that we get a close up view of…multiple pistols and other feminine do dads are within, indicating this is NOT the first time this has happened…This is part of Albert’s M.O. and this is, more than likely, going to happen again! This has been staged to happen while the husband is distracted with helping his wife to gain her composure and “pull herself together”…the need to have the zipper of her dress raised and the hook on the dress secured…the husband fumbles indicating a lack of familiarity and then the wife brazenly moves to Albert to have him finish the task. Albert, of course, is familiar, once again showing us the Lubitsch touch. Based on this scene, what are some things you notice about the scene’s use of sound? Describe a specific sound or line of dialogue you hear and what you think it adds to the scene’s effectiveness. When Albert appears in the open doorway and speaks directly to the audience he is setting the stage for what is going to happen. He is transitioning, momentarily, from French to English for the audience’s behalf. This is most effective! It draws the viewer in to the story line and causes the viewer to wait with anticipation…wondering what else, if anything, does this man have to say to me. It makes the viewer an intimate! In particular, I also noticed how vivid the pistol shots were. The movie indicates the pistol shots were loud enough to be heard outside on the street and we were able to hear the neighborhood scuffling and crying out in response. I noticed and appreciated the use of distal sounds like the opening and closing of doors, and conversations. What themes or approaches might you anticipate from this clip in other depression- era musicals? I would anticipate the approach of actors speaking directly to the audience. I would anticipate a common thread of opulence in settings. I would anticipate and the tolerance of infidelity as a theme in story lines. I would anticipate story lines that really caused the viewer to exercise their observation skills and share in the intrigue… Viewer involvement as another way to escape the realities of daily life
  14. What do you notice about the interaction between the characters in these two scenes? Give specific examples. The first word that comes to mind concerning the interaction between Eddy and Macdonald is “bantering”. The two banter back and forth, in a fun way, throughout the first clip. He jibes her about helping her get to another man. He quotes poetry to help show he is equal to any competition. He jibes again with the lyrics singing “there is an angel’s breath beneath your sigh” and then there is a “devil in your eye”. In this he is calling it as he sees it. Her facial expression shows he is right. The attraction between the two is obvious to the viewer even though she keeps her back to him. Also obvious is the lyrics reach her heart. Initially I thought MacDonald was just being coy…as in pretending to be a bit shy or pretending to be overtly modest. As I continued to watch I felt rather than being coy she was, instead, giving every effort to stay focused on her personal mission regardless of her personal feelings. After all, she did participate and play along within specific parameters…like when she helps give other women’s names that would fit into the song “Rose Marie”. Especially funny is her expression when she gives the name Annabelle as an option! In the second clip, the interaction was SHOWN to us more than SPOKEN. I feel the acting was great. We can hear MacDonald’s fright in the fact she sings slightly off tempo and controls her vibrato to quiver with fear. (Not an easy task when one is trained to sing perfectly) She is visibly upset and finds it hard to concentrate when the piano player is trying to advise her. She is distraught when she sees Eddy…obviously embarrassed that no one is listening but him. He is not tuning her out…he is feeling everything SHE is feeling…he recognized (as we do when we watch) that she is a real trooper and does not give up easily…she turns the performance of the “regular” that steps in to take her place in to a harmonized medley…she attempts to adapt to the situation and then finds she must rise above it all…it seems to me she recognizes she is fitted for different and better things and there must be another way. As she departs you can see Eddy is right there with her. If you have seen either or both of these actors in other films or television shows, please share your perceptions about them. I know I’ve seen “I Married An Angel”, “Balalaika” and “Maytime”. Of these, “Balalaika” had the most influence on me. In “Balalaika” Nelson Eddy co-stars with Ilona Massey, rather than with Jeanette MacDonald. In the scene where Eddy Meets Massey’s father for the first time, Eddy is hiding his true identity, (he is the prince), by pretending to be a poor music student. Because Massey is a revolutionist and works side by side with her father, brother, and other revolutionists, they are gathered together to work for the cause and are suspicious of Eddy. They relentlessly and somewhat covertly, encourage him to prove he is a music student. Eddy sings “The Volga Boatman”. This is a traditional Russian folk song. Eddy, of course, performs beautifully. What stood out to me was the overwhelming influence it had on the group of men as a whole. The movie shows they are moved to raw emotion. I could see passion and patriotism. I could see admiration for, not just the man’s ability to sing, but also the man himself. The group of men seemed to be transported to another time…one in which they related fully to the Burlaks (boatmen). After his performance Eddy is trusted and respected. Eddy sings “The Volga Boatman” in Russian. I was curious if any part of the lyrics would evoke such an overwhelming response from the revolutionists. My research led me to Revolvy.com (an EXCELLENT resource when searching for music/songs)… the site provided lyrics, publications, noteable recordings and arrangements, modern popular culture, references, and transliteration of the lyrics (I was so pleased with the wealth of information)… while this resource revealed nothing in the lyrics to show the response I was looking for… The site provided another answer to my question. As with many folk songs, people can, through their own experiences, relate to “unremitting toil” and “devotion to duty”, things the boatmen experienced... Thanks to the researchers and writers at Revolvy.com. Also in “Balalaika” there is a scene where Massey visits the grave site of her mother. She wants her mother to be “the first to know” she will be performing in her first opera AND that she has met and is in love with a wonderful man (Eddy). My own, personal relatability to missing my mother and wishing to speak with her about life’s joys and concerns became poignant. There is SO much more detail to this movie that could be discussed. I find it interesting that as far as preferences go, I actually prefer the operatic voice of Jeanette Macdonald. I feel MacDonald’s voice stays true to the musical notes (singing in perfect key) and provides a better clarity to the lyrics than does Massey’s. I didn’t let this preference cause me to turn off the movie! Stepping outside of the proverbial “preference” box took me on an interesting, and educational journey. This is proof for me that there is always value in viewing movies that, at first glance, might not be of interest. What do these clips tell you about the male/female relationship as they are depicted in the films during this era? What norms might you expect one supported under the Hollywood Film Code? The clips shown provide an insight to the light and fun side of courting. There is also an insight to the differences between men and women. At the risk of making too broad a generalization, the first clip actually shows that men usually TELL the woman everything they need to know right away…at the first date, so to speak…in comparison women SHOW where their minds and hearts are…often through facial expression or body language. A woman reveals herself over time and as she builds trust in the man. Eddy directly tells her she needs look no further and that he is equal to all competition. He is watching her face to see her reactions and she reveals what is going on in the inside whether she realizes it or not. There is a sweetness and innocence to the relationship and I believe it is a norm that can be expected in other films. The beautiful musical arrangements, extraordinary vocals, fantastic scenery, and interesting, romantic story line are other things I think we can expect from other movies of the era.
  15. I do agree the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might have been realistic for the time. A five pound tip-quite large indicating the money flows freely. ( I don't know if a pun was intended but it struck me as funny. Was he trying to be truthful in saying I'm trying to lose a little...wait...as in wait time...OR...being humorous in tying together pounds for pounds as in...weight...as in physical weight loss? Again, struck me as funny. Additionally, the settings and costumes were lavish; even the audience was in all it's finery. ( The use of the mirror allowed us to see the audiences reaction to Held's performance. There was enjoyment in the idea of "playtime" and letting themselves be carefree.. The mirror also gave insight (even thought understated) to the rivalry taking place between Ziegfield and Billings. Also, the orchids in the dressing room represent opulence, and a huge expense, yet reaping a huge reward by influencing Held to meet with Ziegfield. I think we might expect similar approaches to other depression era musicals as what we have seen here. I would expect underlying tones of ideals which build hope, restore faith, and cause one to feel carefree and leave worries behind. I would expect story lines in which dreams come true or, perhaps, true love is realized. If the film had been scripted pre-code it may have focused more on: -the difficulties involved in world travel -Ziegfield's behavior regarding Held; ie: common law marriage and his unfaithfulness to the relationship -behind the scenes activities regarding the business and contract relationships (ie: tricking the costume designer in to leaving the costumes without payment...again) What other crooked dealings were there? -what is was that caused Held in the relationship as long as she did? Also of filmed pre-code: -We might have seen the men in Held's dressing room -Held's costumes may have been more revealing ( or any of the costumes for that matter) -We may have seen heated arguments or meanness and vindictiveness
  16. I do agree the clip exhibits a brighter perspective of life than might have been realistic for the time. A five pound tip-quite large indicating the money flows freely. ( I don't know if a pun was intended but it struck me as funny. Was he trying to be truthful in saying I'm trying to lose a little...wait...as in wait time...OR...being humorous in tying together pounds for pounds as in...weight...as in physical weight loss? Again, struck me as funny. Additionally, the settings and costumes were lavish; even the audience was in all it's finery. ( The use of the mirror allowed us to see the audiences reaction to Held's performance. There was enjoyment in the idea of "playtime" and letting themselves be carefree.. The mirror also gave insight (even though understated) to the rivalry taking place between Ziegfield and Billings. Also, the orchids in the dressing room represent opulence, and a huge expense, yet reaping a huge reward by influencing Held to meet with Ziegfield. I think we might expect similar approaches to other depression era musicals as what we have seen here. I would expect underlying tones of ideals which build hope, restore faith, and cause one to feel carefree and leave worries behind. I would expect story lines in which dreams come true or, perhaps, true love is realized. If the film had been scripted pre-code it may have focused more on: -the difficulties involved in world travel -Ziegfield's behavior regarding Held; ie: common law marriage and his unfaithfulness to the relationship -behind the scenes activities regarding the business and contract relationships (ie: tricking the costume designer in to leaving the costumes without payment...again) What other crooked dealings were there? -what is was that caused Held in the relationship as long as she did? Also if filmed pre-code: -We might have seen the men in Held's dressing room -Held's costumes may have been more revealing ( or any of the costumes for that matter) -We may have seen heated arguments or meanness and vindictiveness

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