Mary F. Sutak

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About Mary F. Sutak

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  1. I agree with the others that "People" is conversational. If she belted it out, it would have lost all of it's effect. She starts the scene together talking. As she starts to sing she starts to move away but he follows her as if he's starting to get interested and maybe so is she. Finally she stops and the camera stops as she finally states her true feelings about love.
  2. In both Gaslight and MFL we are looking at the females controlled by males. Going in and out of frame and shadow shows changes in thought and emotion between the characters. In the scene Eliza is becoming more anxious because all of a sudden she is a new version of herself. Now what!? It seems Higgins has no answers and could care less. He feels that a good nights sleep will fix everything. Instead, she packs up and leaves.
  3. The battle is shown in the dancing duel. It's a matter of "anything you can do I can do better". This is different because she was not the proverbial damsel in distress. It is not on stage or a group trying to put on a show. It's also not a look and the lives of the rich and famous. This particular movie is showing a more real life Depression era scenario . The woman had to work too to survive.
  4. Lubitsch was a great storyteller. The props help us to understand the story along with Alfred breaking the fourth wall because they were all arguing in French. The sound of the gun, the rattling of the door and the crowd noise help keep the scene and the story together. This whole scene shows how the rich have their problems too.
  5. Even though there is no eye or body contact, the first scene shows definite sexual tension. He's going to chase after her until she catches him. In the second scene she sees him with the other women and feels she's lost him. She is also very embaresed when he sees her trying to sing in the bar. I have seen a couple of their other films together and the formula seems to stay the same. They are always falling in love with each other whether they originally wanted to or not or whether they should or not. Keeping to the code, there's no overt sexual interaction between them.
  6. I do agree this clip shows a lighter side of life apart from what the audience was experiencing in their own. As it says in the line of a song " forget your troubles come on get happy". Most of the themes of this time are love, success on your own so you can go back home and show your friends and family that you're not a dumb slob. If this had been pre-code, her costume would have been more revealing. We would have seen her take off more than her hat in the dressing room. I also would expect the Ziegfeld and Billings would have met her back in her dressing room.
  7. The male lead does not need to be a strong alpha male. Harold Hill slides into town, looks around at what's going on, makes an issue of something innocent and finds a solution in his boys' band. Toddy is the openly gay man in an era that this is not yet accepted let alone portrayed or discussed. Strong men but not aggressive. Men not afraid to eventually be who they really are. Robert Preston took the scripts and scores and did his homework. He made it a point to make the role his own. This is true of his straight roles as well as the musicals.
  8. I also agree with the others that this opening scene is a clear look back at the other eras of musicals. They are looking at the beginnings of many broadway shows in vaudeville. We also know that this movie chronicles the end of vaudeville and thus the death of the musical as we have seen it. Mama Rose comes in bold and brash telling everyone what to do. She wants the best for her kids but I think she wants to have the attention for herself. She sings later that she had the drive to make it but her family wouldn't give her the chance. "Let Me Entertain You" is one song that shows the many ages of Gypsy Rose Lee. It shows her metamorphosis from a child to an adult.
  9. The fantasy ballet sequence at the end of the movie is my favorite part of the movie. It is from the imagination of Gerry Mulligan as if it were one of his paintings he fell into. I feel it's an essential part of the total ballet. It wouldn't have worked otherwise. I agree with everyone that Gerry Mulligan isn't unlikeable. He's just an ordinary guy trying to make a living and perfecting his art. I can understand he would get a little testy when someone tries to over anylise his work or be a bit cautious when someone really wants to by his paintings.
  10. Before the music starts, they are already in rhythm with the tongue twister. It gives them an easy Segway into the song and dance. This is frequently used in musicals to seamlessly get into the music. The poor diction coach!!! He starts out looking good and being in control. It all falls apart when they start singing and dancing. The professor looks perplexed and totally shocked. This is typical strait man. He starts the scene or a routine with good intentions but the comic blows things out of the water by being totally stupid or being a real wise guy. In the scene Don is the proverbial alpha male with Cosmo the beta male who may not get the mischief going but the brains to keep it going. Unfortunately the professor is caught in the middle as a confused innocent bystander.
  11. Doris Day as Calamity Jane is the opposite of the typical female of the '50s and the movies of this time. She is the strong female where most women of the time were demure, submissive wives and mothers. She is representing the women who have had to give up their war time important jobs to return to their homes. Like many actors, the actor grows with the role. You always gain/learn something from what you do. By the time she did Love Me or Leave Me she developed some serious chops. She needed this to be able to do her comedy skills with Rock Hudson. Remember comedy is hard. I feel that her bubbly persona was a plus for her role as Calamity Jane. She was perfect.
  12. Betty Garett is trying to catch and woo Frank Sinatra. Sinatra isn't sure of his feelings and is trying to avoid her. He does everything he can but she is determined. Moving up the stairs and into the bleachers shows the feelings of the charecters. The background music at the beginning of the scene acts as the intro to the song.
  13. The first Judy Garland film I remember was Wizard of Oz. In watching these two movies I could see where she has not only grown up as an actor but as a woman. She can compete with the rest of the world on her terms. She fully shows her full potential in the movie Summer Stock in 1950. I think that this movie and In the good Old Summertime are my favorites.

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