Looney

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About Looney

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 12/18/1974

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    Middle West U.S.

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  1. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Sorry I've fallen way behind following this thread, but I have been watching. In reverse order. LURED (1947) - I really liked almost all of it despite being able to predict the end as soon as the I saw the guilty actor's face appear on screen the first time. Loved how it looked. Loved Lucy. Loved Zucco, Karloff, Coburn, and everyone in the film was great. I can't say that I enjoyed all the twists, but I am definitely putting this movie in the category of possibly needing to own some day. HIS KIND OF WOMAN (1951) - Okay this was a very good movie until Vincent Price showed up - then it became a great movie. I am a Price fan and I had never seen this picture before. WOW! was he fantastic. The only real downfall of the film is that he isn't in it enough. But seriously, you put Robert Mitchum and Raymond Burr in a movie and I am going to watch it. Add Vincent Price and I am kicking myself that I hadn't found this film before now. Okay that does remind me of another issue; Raymond Burr also isn't in the movie enough. But that isn't the big issue. I will have to read other's comments on this because I need to know I am not crazy. Didn't Burr have an accent in his first scene that seemed to disappear when he reappeared? I do plan to go back eventually and read what others have said over the past few weeks. I've just been busy and sick. DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944) - Do I really have to comment?! I've seen it so many times and it is still a classic and I still have my same complaint. I guess it isn't really a complaint, but more of a least favorite part - the entire Zachetti / Lola plot line. It is one of the alternate Universe wishes I have that I'd like to see what happens with the story if those two aren't a part of it. It is a strange thing that I've always had where I feel let down when the story starts focusing on those two. Anyway, I watched the film for the twentieth time to hear Muller's comments and I am glad I did. I really wished there Noir Alley Blu-Ray releases.
  2. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Having said that it is still pretty damn good if you want to see quality acting. I completely agree that BEWARE MY LOVELY might easily induce one into slumber-land, but Robert Ryan was GREAT. Lupino was pretty damn good as well. There is a lot to love about this movie, but I agree that it is definitely a movie you have to be in the mood to see because if you are not it will probably seem a bit dull. Still there are so many questions I have after seeing it. There so many moments that made me question what was really happening. I know that in 1952 what Howard Wilton told you about himself was likely exactly what the filmmakers wanted you to think, but there were still moments where I question it as being the truth. Anyway, I enjoyed the film despite not quite delivering the thrilling punches I was in the mood for this week. (I fully admit my opinion might just be based on the fact that I really like Ryan and Lupino and they were both really good. I also did really like how Howard Wilton was done as far as the script and tension went.)
  3. Looney

    Noir Alley

    NOW THAT'S AN ENDING!!!!! Actually what I mean is how amazing Eva Lester was at the end when she was saying she wasn't in the room so no one could claim she committed murder. Scott played it so casual that you really felt this person felt no responsibility for the end result of her actions. Thanks so much for posting that LornaHansonForbes. I usually don't have time to play media when people post it, but that was a perfect little number to have going while I was straightening up my living room.
  4. Looney

    Noir Alley

    I think it would have been more interesting if she had really had to face the music, legally speaking. The death scene just seemed like a gimmick way to end it. I think it is more the way she died than that she died. I feel I would have been more satisfied with her in jail or if she had possibly died in a less theatrical way. And addressing the comments about Duryea's character. I think the key point is that she was able to UTTERLY destroy him with the simple art of manipulation. TALK ABOUT A STRANGER (1952). What an interesting choice for NOIR ALLEY. I honestly would not have made it to the end if it wasn't for the fact that I wanted to find out what happened to the dog. 🐶 LOL The cinematography was the best part of the film. The movie was okay, but that cinematography made it worth seeing. PS - For all of those looking to get me a gift this holiday season I'll take that TOO LATE FOR TEARS restoration Blu-Ray and everything in the Noir Alley Shop.
  5. Looney

    Noir Alley

    TOO LATE FOR TEARS (1949) WOW!!!!! I wasn't loving this movie first while, but then it really took off. Definitely has my new favorite Dan Duryea scene of all time. It was amazing. And definitely my new favorite Lizabeth Scott movie ever, not that ever really had one before. What a shame Scott didn't like the movie. I thought she was magnificent. She really seemed to be the Femme Fatale who genuinely could not help herself. Her struggle was great. Sometimes there was remorse and sometimes there wasn't. It was outstanding. I think my least favorite part was the end. I don't think it was bad. It just didn't quite give me the level of satisfaction I was looking for.
  6. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Well thankfully they did put CRACK-UP on the Sling TV TCM On Demand, so I was able to finish it early this morning. Hmmmm . . . . I liked many things about it, but I just don't think I am a Pat O'Brien fan. I really liked the bit of against type setup, but very soon after that O'Brien just wasn't selling it for me anymore. It just didn't see him as possibly being any kind of art expert the further I got into the movie. Overall I don't think I'll remember much about this one, other than I love Ray Collins and Herbert Marshall. Admittedly I doubt I'll remember this film just because they are both in it.
  7. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Looney REALLY blew it with CRACK-UP (1946). Fell asleep several times last night. Then I woke up early and watched THE BIG HEAT (1953) On Demand before the rebroadcast of Noir Alley. Then fell asleep at basically the same points during CRACK-UP again. Oh well, THE BIG HEAT (1953) was great.
  8. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Yes. I stopped watching right after the chase scene. It was magnificent. I thought that was a good place to stop for a little bit and then come back to it, but by the time I came back it was gone. And that final scene with Windsor and Cook is just fantastic. You almost hear sympathy for him in her voice and those final words just sum her up so well.
  9. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Pausing the Blu-Ray you can tell it is definitely not James Edwards who shoots Carey. Edwards is wearing a tie, but it is tucked midway down into his shirt. The guard who shoots Carey is wearing a tie that is out of his shirt. As to the Windsor/Cook marriage I look at it as types. Obviously Sherry (Windsor) is attracted to bad guys like Val. So my guess is that is an angle that enabled George to win her over. He promises future security and he is someone she can manipulate as opposed to her usual type, Val. So their marriage makes sense to me in the same sense of all bad marriages. She wanted a type of guy who was all wrong for marriage, safety, and security, so she eventually gave into a guy she knew she could manipulate who promised safety and security. She could believe George because he was so far opposite to men like Val who only promised excitement and drama. I mean movies are so full of character dynamics in marriages like this. The marriage is either bad because she married the wild stallion she never should have or because she married the seemingly safe guy in hopes she would be taken care of. Okay so this is off topic, but so annoying. Last night I was watching THE SEVEN-UPS (1973) on Sling TV TCM ON DEMAND. I had to stop for about forty minutes to do something else and when I came back the movie was gone. No joke. It was suddenly no longer available to watch. WOW is that annoying!!!!! And I am currently watching HOTEL ARTEMIS (2018). It is pretty good after an hour in.
  10. Looney

    Noir Alley

    So been out of the loop for a couple of weeks, but I wasn't about to miss, THE KILLING (1956). Such a great and interesting movie. Only complaint I have would be the shootout. I know it is supposed to be chaotic and I am fine with that, but it seems to be cut just a hair too quickly to be believed. Moving on to what I love - ALL HAIL MARIE WINDSOR!!!!! But seriously, I don't know if I can think of another movie where a supporting player so completely steals the show with their performance. We've seen this character type a many times, but no other actor will ever do it better. She is amazing. Her scenes with Cook might be the best scenes of HIS career. She really brought the movie to a different level. In other words, I thought she was really good. So Muller talked about the narration. Where do people stand on this? Personally I think there are actually certain scenes that needed it. I can't believe I am going to say I agree with Studio Executives, but there are certain times I know audiences in the 50's would have been lost. As an example, when Nikki leaves the farm. I can see audiences getting confused by who is supposed to be where when. I tried to imagine it without the narration. I could see it working today just fine, but not so much in 1956. Does anyone know of a DVD or Blu-Ray release that has a version without the narration?
  11. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Okay so I had to skip over all THE SNIPER discussion because it never did show up on my Sling TV TCM On Demand after I missed it last weekend. I did catch PANIC IN THE STREETS on that very On Demand access portal. WOW!!!!! I purchased the Blu-Ray immediately. I LOVED every minute of that movie. THE THREAT (1949) - I enjoyed. I did not immediately look to purchase it , but I would definitely sit down and watch it again if it came on. I will say that I'm not quite sure why anyone ever thought O'Shea was going to be a major star. His performance was fine, but I didn't really see anything outstanding. I can only assume it has to do with the fact that he could act, sing, and dance so people believed he would make it big? I don't know. McGraw definitely stole the show, but I thought the whole cast was pretty good. Virginia Grey also really stood out. And Muller was definitely right about the climax.
  12. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Okay so I've been quiet for the past two because A. I was busy and B. neither impressed me too much. I thought they were both decent enough, but I'd never likely seek them out again. THE HUNTED - I never for one second believed Belita was any sort of threat. If anything I worried stalker Johnny was going to kill her. This film had some qualities I REALLY liked, but I can't say that on the whole it was very memorable unless it is used as an example of a film where the perceived hero seems like the actual threat. FOLLOW ME QUIETLY - I have to say that the 60min running time was my favorite part. Lots of stuff to like in this one, but I DEFINITELY think Jeff Corey would have been a better choice to play Harry Grant. Lundigan did absolutely nothing I found interesting. I think a big issue I had with this one is that I saw a lot of potential for a really good story and I felt like they dropped the ball. SPOILER And I'm sorry, but the scene in the darkened office on the rainy night was excellent, but it turning out that the dummy was someone we're obviously supposed to think was The Judge was just too far fetched. Maybe if something similar had happened earlier I might believe The Judge would attempt something like that, but the way it happened just seemed unbelievable. I admit it was wonderfully creepy and there were some great moments like that, but FOLLOW ME QUIETLY is another one that on the whole fell short for me. I did really enjoy Jeff Corey's work in this one and, as I said, I think it would have played better for me had he been Harry Grant. Of course, in 1949 his face wasn't as marketable as Lundigan's. AND just to confirm, FOLLOW ME QUIETLY has not shown up on my TCM On Demand either.
  13. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Definitely agree on the "superficial matter." THE DAMNED DON'T CRY - I enjoyed it. I found it to be a little dull until the transformation into Lorna occurred. I thought Crawford was great. So here is something I felt, and if I missed someone else saying this please let me know, but isn't this a Noir movie from the Femme Fatale's point of view? That is what I kept thinking. It was a movie where you see where the Femme Fatale is coming from and why she is the way she is. Am I wrong? Have others been discussing this and I missed it? She basically destroys three men's lives and her own, unintentionally but for selfish reasons. I can't say I loved this movie, but I do feel like it is a must see just because it focuses on a female lead in this type of story. I thought the script was great and it was well made.
  14. Looney

    Noir Alley

    I did. WOW!!!!! I LOVED IT!!!! I thought ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW was fantastic on EVERY level. I plan to buy the Blu-Ray immediately. I only wish it had Muller's bookends to go with it. I'm not joking when I say I loved ever minute. I am actually planning to watch it again just to try to find a complaint. PLEASE let me know where you all see the flaws. I was blown away. I love Robert Ryan, but after seeing this I now love Harry Belafonte as an actor. I wasn't familiar at all with his acting work until this. Seriously everyone in this cast was so fantastic. I could go on about every performance, but the one that really elated me was Richard Bright. OMG!!!!! I've seen that guy in so many movies where he was playing a type and him as Coco just knocked my socks off. I recognized him immediately and it just floored me that he was playing a similar character to characters I've seen him play before, but what a twist. I love seeing actors stretch their range and in 1959 Coco was a brave character to bring to life.
  15. Looney

    Noir Alley

    Okay late to the party so I'll be brief. THE STRANGER - Like many I've seen it a few times. Enjoyable, but not extremely memorable. There are some excellent qualities, but ultimately THE STRANGER isn't going to make many Top Ten lists. Love the actors, love the small town setting. I feel like this movie is a template that others followed. I read people talking about the suspension of disbelief that this was taking place just a years after the war ended. I got the impression that we were supposed to think Franz Kindler fled Germany early. I don't know why, but when I was watching it there seemed to be a moment that suggested he disappeared well before the war ended. I have no clue when that might have been, but it seems like it was at some point when Wilson was describing something about Kindler. THE GANGSTER - I really enjoyed it and I LOVED the sets. I like that Muller said it was very "theatrical". I think part of the point is that it is supposed to feel like a small world; their little chunk of a big boardwalk. Yeah we all know it was a money thing, but I definitely enjoyed the atmosphere Wiles created. I loved the psychology of it and that where you expect their to be typical cliche gangster stuff they actually say lines like "Things aren't done that way anymore." I liked the point that Shubunka had a gang, but he lost control of them because he got too distracted by extracurricular activities. I liked that the scene in the pool hall didn't go typical gangster and have him start knocking some of the guys around when they told him they weren't his guys anymore. The movie had so many moments toward the end where I thought this or that was going to happen and then they went a different way. I love that Cornell just backed off when Shubunka came for the sit down. It was like they were breaking the rules. SO I enjoyed THE GANGSTER. I hadn't seen it before and I am very glad I have now. I thought the cast was great and I definitely have a new respect for Barry Sullivan.

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