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laffite

WORDS

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This thread is inspired by a quip someone made over in Gen Disc but mainly by the OP of that excellent Galaxy thread in which a Word of the Day is presented and which I enjoy very much.

 

This is not a Word of the Day thread. In fact, I would like to expressly forbid such a feature. So please don't. If the OP of Galaxy would be interested, I would permit it. He should retain the rights on that IMO, at least as far as this thread is concerned. Thanks.

 

So it's an outlet to give out one's favorite words and to perhaps discuss them a bit and provide back stories about any experience with them or whatever. This is about words you enjoy, words that please you.

 

Obscure words not normally seen in conversation or informal writing is certainly fair game but should not be considered a primary objective here.

 

==

 

A word I like a lot but is not used much any more (it seems to me) is extravagant. See what I mean, a simple word with a clear meaning. When I was little my mother used to say we are being too extravagant, i.e. spending too much money. As a kid I caddied for a neighbor for awhile until he called to say that he must forego a caddie because he has been too extravagant (big, fat liar).

 

"She was rather extravagant with her wardrobe."

 

"She was good in the role but I wouldn't praise her as extravagantly as others do."

 

The word pleases me. Just that.

 

I use a simple word here to enforce the idea that simplicity is good. Everyday words can be much appreciated as something more special than that.

 

Much more difficult words are much desired as well, in fact very necessary.

 

==

 

BTW, I am not a wordnik. Those who are truly crazy about words and make a great study of them. They know all the roots, the prefixes, the suffixes, etymology, everything. That's not me. But I do have a simple lay appreciation for them (like most of us, probably).

 

If you are a wordnik, bring it on. If you are a simpleton like me, bring it on.

 

If you have examples within your lexicon, sell them here.

 

Thanks!

 

:)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The taxonomy of vernacular is a pernicious bugbear for some anti-philologists,  but I have always luxuriated in the byzantine minutia of amateur lexicography.

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I might have mentioned this somewhere along the line,

but I have always liked the word/words gin mill, IOW

a bar. My father uses it once in a while when talking

about the "good old days." Yeah, so we were at this

gin mill....Imagine a mill where they produce gin instead

of something else, and I don't even like gin that much,

just the sound of the phrase.

 

Two for the price of one--exoteric, the opposite of

esoteric. Spellcheck is giving exoteric the red

underline. That proves that exoteric is itself

esoteric. Sweet.

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"Gin mill" goes back to the prohibition days when they actually made gin in the back of the establishment, i.e. "bathtub gin". I love those 20's-30's slang terms, myself.

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"Gin mill" goes back to the prohibition days when they actually made gin in the back of the establishment, i.e. "bathtub gin". I love those 20's-30's slang terms, myself.

I always imagine a mill as being in some rural area of

the country, and being used to grind corn or something

practical. The idea of a mill making gin is what makes me

smile. Bathtub gin, not exactly a mind picture that makes

one crave it, but during Prohibition you had to take what

you could get.

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The taxonomy of vernacular is a pernicious bugbear for some anti-philologists,  but I have always luxuriated in the byzantine minutia of amateur lexicography.

anything like phenomenology? :D

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"Home brew" can mean lot of things.

 

Make your own beer...

brooklyn-brew-beer-making-kit-2.jpg

 

0316-NB-Brew.Share.Enjoy.Kit-Slide.jpg

 

 

...or your own rig.

 

3Transceivers.jpg

 

vhf1.jpg

 

 

 

Like the latter because it don't leave a hang over. :D

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The taxonomy of vernacular is a pernicious bugbear for some anti-philologists,  but I have always luxuriated in the byzantine minutia of amateur lexicography.

 

To post with such dexterity with virituoso reach. I may respond after I look up some of those words. Though I shan't respond with such extravagance (besides I wouldn't know how). I am an anti-extravagant being and prefer the minutia of lucidity, luxuriating in the great Voltaire, of whom it is my wont to follow as he is the hexagon of simple expression in the vaunted Classical style that all simpletons revere. It will be in this vernacular that my memoirs will be published for all posterior.

 

-

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As a long time follower and admirer of BILL RABE's  "Unicorn Hunter's", a society for "the prevention, and banishment of words and phrases that are misused, overused and useless", I've grown to not play favorites, but address peeves of this sort with mispronunciation thrown in.

 

Go to LAKE SUPERIOR STATE UNIVERSITY for access of both The Unicorn Hunters and their list of "banished" words and phrases.  The list has traditionally had annual additions to it, and outside contributions and suggestions are welcome.

 

I can possibly for now give one example that's wound up on the list....

 

"Shower activity", a phrase very much in use a couple of decades ago on TV weather forecasts in place of just simply saying "rain".

 

A lot of modern day popular culture idioms often make the list as well.

 

You may also find on the list those very popular Watergate era phrases.."This point in time"  (or NOW!)  and "That point in time"( or THEN!).

 

Give a look.  I'm sure many of you here will enjoy it.

 

 

Sepiatone

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As a long time follower and admirer of BILL RABE's  "Unicorn Hunter's", a society for "the prevention, and banishment of words and phrases that are misused, overused and useless", I've grown to not play favorites, but address peeves of this sort with mispronunciation thrown in.

 

Go to LAKE SUPERIOR STATE UNIVERSITY for access of both The Unicorn Hunters and their list of "banished" words and phrases.  The list has traditionally had annual additions to it, and outside contributions and suggestions are welcome.

 

I can possibly for now give one example that's wound up on the list....

 

"Shower activity", a phrase very much in use a couple of decades ago on TV weather forecasts in place of just simply saying "rain".

 

A lot of modern day popular culture idioms often make the list as well.

 

You may also find on the list those very popular Watergate era phrases.."This point in time"  (or NOW!)  and "That point in time"( or THEN!).

 

Give a look.  I'm sure many of you here will enjoy it.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

"Not to my recollection."

 

Sounds so much more objective and circumspect, better than "I don't remember" which sounds stupid, evasive, and BS.

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What a great thread idea!

 

I've always loved the word "incognito". I'm not sure why... I think it's just the sound of it. :)

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What a great thread idea!

 

I've always loved the word "incognito". I'm not sure why... I think it's just the sound of it. :)

I like that word too. It reminds me of another word that I like: clandestine.

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I like that word too. It reminds me of another word that I like: clandestine.

"She found it necessary to be incognito to successfully launch the clandestine operation."

 

Yeah. I like that. ;)

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I've always loved the word "incognito". I'm not sure why... I think it's just the sound of it. :)

 

...and the meaning is rather mysterious. Liking words and not knowing why is interesting in it's own right.

 

Princess, clandestine reminds me just now of long ago as a kid when I was wafting my way through An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser and how often he used this word. There were many illicit rendezvous and invariably they had to meet "in some clandestine place." I almost got sick of the phrase.

 

"They finally became wary of continually having to find some clandestine place to exchange their shows of love so they decided to simply go incognito."

 

Now, why didn't Dreiser think of that?

:blink:

 

-

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AMBIGUOUS  is a word I often toss into conversation when the subject matter is vague to me.  Of course, I could just simply suggest the the subject is "vague" to me, but that wouldn't be very "psuedo intellectual" of me now, would it?  ;)

 

OBDURATE is another.  I used it recently to describe my wife's tendencies to her attending nurse.  Then I had to explain what I meant.

 

APPRECIATE is a word that often( in a case of MINE) gets misunderstood.  Many people think it simply means a measure of gratitude.  Indeed, they might have gotten the idea from ANDY GRIFFITH who in a commercial for some product asked the audience to give the product a try and ended by saying, "I appreciate it, and good night."

 

But one day, a guy in the plant I worked in mentioned his Dad had died a few days earlier and that he was taking the nominal three days grievance allowed him by contract.  Since MY Dad had died three months prior, I told him, "I can appreciate your grief."  Next thing I knew, I was flat on the floor with a throbbing jaw!

 

The foreman rushed over and asked what the ruckus was about.  The guy indignantly complained, while pointing at me that,   "He said he was GLAD that my Dad died!"  When I told the boss what I actually said, he told the guy to wait in his office, and he'd have a quick talk to him.

 

FRACAS is a word that not many use or know the meaning of.  In a JOSEPH WAMBAUGH book, police are called in to quell a barroom brawl.  On the scene, among the witnesses is a woman pressing on a  nasty cut in her lower abdomen.  We a cop asked, "Did you get cut in the FRACAS?"  She replied, "No.  'Bout two or three inches ABOVE it!"  :D

 

Sepiatone 

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>>>>FRACAS is a word that not many use or know the meaning of.  In a JOSEPH WAMBAUGH book, police are called in to quell a barroom brawl.  On the scene, among the witnesses is a woman pressing on a  nasty cut in her lower abdomen.  We a cop asked, "Did you get cut in the FRACAS?"  She replied, "No.  'Bout two or three inches ABOVE it!"

===

 

If the cop had said instead, "Did you get cut in the ruckus," she probably would have said, "No, 'bout four inches above it."

 

Didn't Andy use that on this show a lot? Or no? I didn't watch it much but I can hear him sayin' that, usually without the first letter. " 'Preciate it! "

 

.

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I've always enjoyed perambulate, postprandial, obsequiousness, and folderol. 

 

Offhand, these words seem fitting for formal writing.

 

I had to look up folderol. I see it has a long history of use but it doesn't thrill me. The sound doesn't seem to fit the meaning, perhaps it's because it's not likely to turn up in conversation. But it is an uppity word. It sounds like a pain killer.  I am not fond of balderdash but it works for me, a nonsense word in itself. I haven't done any looking up but there are probably a lot of wacky sounding synonyms.

 

Three of your words begin with F. Poor obsequiousness is all alone. The quality of his very essence might help it get along (since he is outnumbered). And O comes before P, so he can rub that in. I'm being silly because I like to indulge in rank folderol whenever possible. Ouch, it doesn't sound right.

 

"After stuffing our faces by slamming down the carcass bone and all, we indulged in the postprandial treat of dark bock while enjoying a game of skin the donkey." Although this word would be more at home in a uppity costume drama.

 

"The migration of this particular convocation of worms grew and grew and soon was a major perambulation as it made its way to devour Polonius."

 

Alas, poor Polonius.

Edited by laffite
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I've always enjoyed perambulate, postprandial, obsequiousness, and folderol. 

 

Offhand, these words seem fitting for formal writing.

 

I had to look up folderol. I see it has a long history of use but it doesn't thrill me. The sound doesn't seem to fit the meaning, perhaps it's because it's not likely to turn up in conversation. But it is an uppity word. It sounds like a pain killer.  I am not fond of balderdash but it works for me, a nonsense word in itself. I haven't done any looking up but there are probably a lot of wacky sounding synonyms.

 

Three of your words begin with F. Poor obsequiousness is all alone. The quality of his very essence might help it get along (since he is outnumbered). And O comes before P, so he can rub that in. I'm being silly because I like to indulge in rank folderol whenever possible. Ouch, it doesn't sound right.

 

"After stuffing our faces by slamming down the carcass bone and all, we indulged in the postprandial treat of dark bock while enjoying a game of skin the donkey." Although this word would be more at home in a uppity costume drama.

 

"The migration of this particular convocation of worms grew and grew and soon was a major perambulation as it made its way to devour Polonius."

 

Alas, poor Polonius.

 

These are like words created by the medical profession to replace the 1 or 2 syllable ones which the other 99 % of the world uses to describe things.

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Laughter is part of: slaughter.

Mother is part of: smother.

 

Backpfeifengesicht

Hygge

Komorebi

Exulansis

Formication

 

I have read that: California is derived from: Cali - Latin - heat; Forn - Latin - sex; nia - Greek - land. This means that: California means: "The land of hot sex."

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Laughter is part of: slaughter.

Mother is part of: smother.

 

Backpfeifengesicht

Hygge

Komorebi

Exulansis

Formication

 

I have read that: California is derived from: Cali - Latin - heat; Forn - Latin - sex; nia - Greek - land. This means that: California means: "The land of hot sex."

 

I heard the California State Legislature appealed to the Federal Government for a patent making it exclusively a California State thing, but it didn't pass.

 

Sometime just seeing words spelled on a page (sans definitions) can be pleasurable in a visual way. Like those words above. I can guess the meaning through context but they look neat without definitions (except the last one, the F word, since it has been ruined by familiarity, as a word if not necessarily a practice, alas.)

 

 

 

.

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Princess of Tap has just used the word obstreperous in another thread. Way to go!

 

An ~~~ child.

 

Super.

 

-

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Formication

 

 

except the last one, the F word, since it has been ruined by familiarity, as a word if not necessarily a practice, alas.)

.

 

"Formication is the medical term for a sensation that exactly resembles that of small insects crawling on (or under) the skin."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formication

 

I am sorry that I did not realize that any would need definitions for those words.

 

Backpfeifengesicht means a face which richly needs to be punched very hard.
 
Hygge means the gentle enjoyment of the simple pleasures in life.
 
Komorebi means gentle sunlight as seen through a tree.
 
Exulansis means abandoning attempts to explain experience because others do not relate to it or understand its importance.

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"Formication is the medical term for a sensation that exactly resembles that of small insects crawling on (or under) the skin."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formication

 

I am sorry that I did not realize that any would need definitions for those words.

 

Backpfeifengesicht means a face which richly needs to be punched very hard.
 
Hygge means the gentle enjoyment of the simple pleasures in life.
 
Komorebi means gentle sunlight as seen through a tree.
 
Exulansis means abandoning attempts to explain experience because others do not relate to it or understand its importance.

 

 

This is the second time today I've been shown up for silly mistakes. They should have an emoticon for red in the face.

 

I am sorry that I did not realize that any would need definitions for those words.

 

Really?

 

Perhaps you meant "want" vice "need."

 

I certainly didn't know them.

 

Well, I'm glad you did.

 

Thanks.

 

:)

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This is the second time today I've been shown up for silly mistakes. They should have an emoticon for red in the face.

 

I am sorry that I did not realize that any would need definitions for those words.

 

Really?

 

Perhaps you meant "want" vice "need."

 

I certainly didn't know them.

 

Well, I'm glad you did.

 

Thanks.

 

:)

 

You stand defined.

:P

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