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laffite

WORDS

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Sans Fin--

 

I like that word; it reminds me of the French word for ant--la fourmi, creepy crawly things.

 

La Cigale et La Fourmi

 

The one that normally begins any selected (or complete) Fables de La Fontaine. I love'em.

 

.

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La Cigale et La Fourmi

 

The one that normally begins any selected (or complete) Fables de La Fontaine. I love'em.

 

.

Laffite--

 

For the French children, La Fontaine takes the place of nursery rhymes, but on a larger scale, more having to deal with life's lessons.

 

Once I went to see Fabrice Luchini in a one- man show in Paris. He performed L'Ours et L'Amateur des Jardins, as if it was Shakespeare.

 

My youth would have been a better place if I had been taught some of that when I was young.

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Laffite--

 

For the French children, La Fontaine takes the place of nursery rhymes, but on a larger scale, more having to deal with life's lessons.

 

Once I went to see Fabrice Luchini in a one- man show in Paris. He performed L'Ours et L'Amateur des Jardins, as if it was Shakespeare.

 

My youth would have been a better place if I had been taught some of that when I was young.

 

It's been remarked that some of the lessons may not be for children. La Cigale and the Fourmi smacks of this.

 

I posted this on the poetry thread a few months ago and easily retrievable, so please indulge:

 

==

 

The Grasshopper and the Ant

 

The grasshopper, after singing

all summer long

found she was low on provisions

when the wintry north wind arrived.

Not a single little bit

of fly or wormlet to eat.

 

She cried hunger to the home of her neighbor,

the ant

asking her to lend a few grains until springtime.

"I'll pay you," she said,

"before harvest time, on my word as animal,

both interest and principal."

 

The ant wasn't the lending kind,

If she had a fault, it wasn't that one.

 

"What were you doing during the warm weather?"

she asked the borrower.

"Night and day I would sing to all and sundry,

if it so please you, good ma'am."

"Singing were you now, oh so glad to hear.

Well now, why don't you dance."

 

Jean de la Fontaine (1621-1695)

 

[trans. by Stanley Appelbaum, with a clarification by laffite]

 

***

Ouch!  If learning compassion is a good thing, one might look elsewhere.

 

(and yet it does say something about preparing for the future)

 

I'm sure, Princess, that you are aware that Le Corbeau et Le Renard (The Crow and the Fox) is the fable that French schoolchildren are made to recite the most often and presumably the one they learn to hate as adults (maybe, dunno). In much better taste to the young palate, the dangers of base flattery and what it may cost you.

 

==

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One word I always stop and think about when I hear or see it is: Clandestine

 

This always makes me think "Candles" and "Chandelier".

 

Now, a name I have always found interesting to pronounce,

and it also has a nice ring to it is: Hermione Gingold

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Funny.

 

Such snarky humor for Sesame Street.

 

No wonder the kids are the way they are

:D

 

Stuffy French mothers enraged?

 

How dare they cast aspersions on the Arts?

 

Jean de la Fontaine taking a peak from the crypt--- "parbleu"

 

Les Fables de La Fontaine the way we like to see them.

 

A grasshopper getting squashed, how fun

 

But funny.

 

Thanks, SansFin

 

==

 

SansFin, if I may, do you know French? Your screen name suggest you might.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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if I may, do you know French? Your screen name suggest you might.

 

 

My speaking of French is doubtful. I was taught to speak and understand it in immersion course many decades ago but had little opportunity to practice or use it and quickly forgot what I learned.

 

Username is due to my personal history:
 
My uncle ran a small movie house showing foreign movies. He would tend me while my mother worked. My highchair stood next to his projector. It became a family joke that I could read a foreign language before I could speak because I would be very quiet all the time a movie played but I would begin to fuss the moment: "Fin" appeared on the screen as I knew it meant the movie was done. 
 
It has been from that time a basic part of me that I do not wish movies to end.

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My speaking of French is doubtful. I was taught to speak and understand it in immersion course many decades ago but had little opportunity to practice or use it and quickly forgot what I learned.

 

Username is due to my personal history:
 
My uncle ran a small movie house showing foreign movies. He would tend me while my mother worked. My highchair stood next to his projector. It became a family joke that I could read a foreign language before I could speak because I would be very quiet all the time a movie played but I would begin to fuss the moment: "Fin" appeared on the screen as I knew it meant the movie was done. 
 
It has been from that time a basic part of me that I do not wish movies to end.

 

 

I think you should be grateful, SansFin, that those foreign movies have "Fin" at the end, otherwise you wouldn't have a screen name.

 

Cute story. If ever there may be a competition for best screen name origin story, you might be favored for the Gold. It may not be the most spectacular story of all time but it is certainly unique (and charming).

 

Perhaps one day a movie that never ends will be made. If it ever happens I'll be thinking of you.

 

;)

 

Thanks

 

:)

 

==

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Friend LornaHansonForbes (or is it MissWonderly?) has been employing interstitial quite often of late. Of course, lesser minds---me---had to look it up (I need the exercise anyway). The primary definitions have sent me into a whirlwind of vertigo, subjects so grievously out of my range to virtually render the word useless. I know not science. Biology, Physics, Medicine (this word might become an integral part of my life should I ever be diagnosed with Interstitial Cystitis or any other disease that happens somewhere between membranes, organs, or the like.

 

In between, that's where Lorna (or misswonderly) is at. A small space either already there or occupied by something that wouldn't fit elsewhere. Or to rephrase, something unlike inserted in between like items, that something not being a part.

 

...to wit, "The interstitial on Gregory Peck" [a short feature] preceded the main features later shown [movies]

 

Lovely.

 

(of course, in our vibrant and versatile language, there are simpler synonyms to be considered and that is valid for many of our more obscure and uppity words (think: William F Buckley and other mavens of verbal pyrotechnics) but interstitial makes the cut, to my mind.

 

Initially the word seemed a bit cold to me but it's usage there warms it up a bit.

 

Is this a word you would be likely use, or does it go down the memory hole?

 

:unsure:

"I'll have to think about it."

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Mystagogue.

 

Nonesuch.

 

I don't use them very often, but I like to

see them in print.

 

Mystagogue is deliciously creepy.

 

"The nonesuch movie Memento is unique in that no filmmaker can imitate it without being labeled a copycat."

 

--

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Is this a word you would be likely use, or does it go down the memory hole?

 

 

I used the word fairly often some years ago. I do not use it much of recent because my spillchequer would never accept any of my attempted spellings of the word and because I was advised to eschew obfuscation by using smaller and more common words.

 

A word which I like but do not use is: floccinaucinihilipilification. It is the habit of regarding some things as being unimportant. Part of my affection for the word may be that I learned of it in cartoon strip which many people regard as being unimportant.

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I used the word fairly often some years ago. I do not use it much of recent because my spillchequer would never accept any of my attempted spellings of the word and because I was advised to eschew obfuscation by using smaller and more common words.

 

A word which I like but do not use is: floccinaucinihilipilification. It is the habit of regarding some things as being unimportant. Part of my affection for the word may be that I learned of it in cartoon strip which many people regard as being unimportant.

 

I see the definition is often (if not mostly or always) used humorously. I hope your advisor would not get in the way of good joke. Apparently he/she is now unimportant as you have used it thus.

 

There are a couple of pronunciations in the link below. The U.K. version is slurry, intentional no doubt ;-) Uppity Englishman.

 

:wacko:

 

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/floccinaucinihilipilification

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Of the following three words, I use only Strengths several times per year - I seem to always become stuck at the end with ths.. I can't stop pronouncing the ending.

 

These three words are special due to their length, but not because they contain many syllables or the most letters.

 

Strengths has only nine letters, but all except one of them are consonants! This earns the word a Guinness World Record. It is also one of the longest monosyllabic words of the English language.

 

Euouae is six letters long, but all of the letters are vowels. It holds two Guinness World Records. It’s the longest English word composed exclusively of vowels, and it has the most consecutive vowels of any word. If you are wondering about its meaning, it’s a musical term from medieval times.

 

If you tsktsk someone, you indicate your disapproval by the tsktsk sound or by some other means. Tsktsks is the longest word that doesn’t contain a vowel.

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Jitney - this word has always amused me.

This has as one definition: A small, wheeled cart or platform dolly.

 

Growing up, older relatives who had been through WWII and the Korean War would often use this word when describing some makeshift vehicle the locals would use for hauling just about anything.

 

A friend who is a retired U.S.A.F Colonel often spoke of himself and his friends as they grew up in the Philippines making motorized versions built from almost nothing.

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I enjoy using jackanapes, homunculi, festooned, tubercular, and ossified, 

 

For example: "I feel like a jackanapes when I go out festooned in ossified tubercular homunculi."

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Of the following three words, I use only Strengths several times per year - I seem to always become stuck at the end with ths.. I can't stop pronouncing the ending.

 

These three words are special due to their length, but not because they contain many syllables or the most letters.

 

Strengths has only nine letters, but all except one of them are consonants! This earns the word a Guinness World Record. It is also one of the longest monosyllabic words of the English language.

 

Euouae is six letters long, but all of the letters are vowels. It holds two Guinness World Records. It’s the longest English word composed exclusively of vowels, and it has the most consecutive vowels of any word. If you are wondering about its meaning, it’s a musical term from medieval times.

 

If you tsktsk someone, you indicate your disapproval by the tsktsk sound or by some other means. Tsktsks is the longest word that doesn’t contain a vowel.

 

"Know that we have divided

In three our Kingdom; and 'tis our fast intent

To shake all cares and business from our age;

Conferring them on younger strengths, while we

Unburthened crawl toward death." --Shak. King Lear

 

Tsktsk is a variant of tsk tsk and tsk-tsk but I guess that's enough to call it a word. I won't argue, que sais-je? But I think advocates of psst should lobby for psstpsst being a word since the one syllable oft follows hard upon the twyndylling. Then they would eclipse tsktsk in Guiness.

 

But wait, have they both been eclipsed by an upstart?

 

"Twyndyllyngs is the longest word in English that doesn't contain one of the five vowels (AEIOU). It comes from Welsh and is obviously rare, but it does appear in the Oxford English Dictionary. It turns out that 'twyndyllyng' (singular) is a 15th century spelling of the word 'twinling,' which means, in modern English, 'twin.'"  ---Yahoo Answers

 

"I am much smarter than my twyndyllyng."

 

Say it loud and it's almost like singing.

;)

 

But wait, upstart twyndyllings still has vowels (the "... and sometimes Y" clause that schoolteachers used to make us say)

 

So tsktsk hangs on, no vowels. But I do feel as a variant it is a mite diminished.

 

Any "psstpsst" advocates out there?

 

:blink:

 

=

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I enjoy using jackanapes, homunculi, festooned, tubercular, and ossified, 

 

For example: "I feel like a jackanapes when I go out festooned in ossified tubercular homunculi."

 Ok. Now you've gone and reminded me of a word I use frequently: Consumption

 

The meaning I present here is that of a pulmonary disease : tuberculosis

 

I have not met one single person to whom I've spoken this word in a sentence (referring to tuberculosis) who has understood the meaning. I always get a quizzical look.

 

I picked it up from a Clint Eastwood movie: Honkytonk Man (1982) - a fairly decent movie, I might add - and one rarely shown.. anywhere.

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 Ok. Now you've gone and reminded me of a word I use frequently: Consumption

 

The meaning I present here is that of a pulmonary disease : tuberculosis

 

I have not met one single person to whom I've spoken this word in a sentence (referring to tuberculosis) who has understood the meaning. I always get a quizzical look.

 

I picked it up from a Clint Eastwood movie: Honkytonk Man (1982) - a fairly decent movie, I might add - and one rarely shown.. anywhere.

 

I know "consumption", as in TB. It was popular in westerns, when the disease was more prevalent. When I was a kid my father was given a false diagnosis of TB, so my whole family had to get tested. It made an impression, so any mentions of TB or consumption or tubercular caught my eye or ear from then on.

 

I watched Honkytonk Man fairly recently, as well. Eastwood was maturing as a filmmaker with that one.

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 Ok. Now you've gone and reminded me of a word I use frequently: Consumption

 

The meaning I present here is that of a pulmonary disease : tuberculosis

 

I have not met one single person to whom I've spoken this word in a sentence (referring to tuberculosis) who has understood the meaning. I always get a quizzical look.

 

I picked it up from a Clint Eastwood movie: Honkytonk Man (1982) - a fairly decent movie, I might add - and one rarely shown.. anywhere.

 

Those "quizzical" ones have obviously not read those magnificent 19c Russian novels. Everyone is coming down with consumption, especially in Chekhov ( it seems to me).

 

In defense of the quizzicals I don't think the word is used much today. I will stand corrected if otherwise.

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Word came to mind in the BREXIT thread.

 

quag·mire
ˈkwaɡˌmī(ə)r/
.........
  1.  

 

 

This word thrived during the Vietnam era. The first thing to come to mind (for me)

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