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laffite

WORDS

319 posts in this topic

Mystagogue is deliciously creepy.

Yes it is. You can even tell by the sound of it that it

won't have anything to do with rainbows and unicorns.

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Tuberculosis took on as the word and took consumption

out of the conversation and then made it seem old-fashioned.

Not too surprised that many people don't know it anymore.

Similar to the grippe and, more recently, manic depression.

Chekhov was so dedicated to his art that he himself died of

tuberculosis at the young age of 44.

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Tuberculosis took on as the word and took consumption

out of the conversation and then made it seem old-fashioned.

Not too surprised that many people don't know it anymore.

Similar to the grippe and, more recently, manic depression.

Chekhov was so dedicated to his art that he himself died of

tuberculosis at the young age of 44.

French writer Albert Camus was so plagued by tuberculosis that he couldn't finish his studies for the French PhD teaching equivalent for higher education, l'agrégation.

 

As a result he couldn't make a living teaching like Sartre or Simone de Beauvoir, so he resorted to the theatre to journalism and eventually writing fiction. For that reason both of those other writers often looked down on him, especially as he disagreed with some aspects of their philosophy and their later adhearance to the Communist Party.

 

In fact, it was his tuberculosis that caused him to be in France and able to take part in the resistance-- having gone to the unoccupied zone for treatment of tuberculosis, he got stuck there.

 

But ironically, Camus died in an automobile accident and not from tuberculosis.

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Well, we all know by now that when we hear the word "consumption" in some period piece movie that it's a referrence to "tuberculosis".

 

My Grandmother survived having it and lived to be 86.  She also survived having 80% of the bones in her body being broken after having been rolled like a pencil between two trolley cars in Pittsburgh back in 1928.

 

But I still keep forgetting to ask my doctor what the HELL "the vapors" was!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I like when certain words are pronounced a specific way.

 

Choice as cherce.

 

words as woids or murder as moidah.

 

Charlie as Chahlee

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I like when certain words are pronounced a specific way.

 

Choice as cherce.

 

words as woids or murder as moidah.

 

Charlie as Chahlee

 

103_103%20aaa.jpg

 

Then you must like this ...

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French writer Albert Camus was so plagued by tuberculosis that he couldn't finish his studies for the French PhD teaching equivalent for higher education, l'agrégation.

 

As a result he couldn't make a living teaching like Sartre or Simone de Beauvoir, so he resorted to the theatre to journalism and eventually writing fiction. For that reason both of those other writers often looked down on him, especially as he disagreed with some aspects of their philosophy and their later adhearance to the Communist Party.

 

In fact, it was his tuberculosis that caused him to be in France and able to take part in the resistance-- having gone to the unoccupied zone for treatment of tuberculosis, he got stuck there.

 

But ironically, Camus died in an automobile accident and not from tuberculosis.

I didn't realize Camus suffered from TB, or else had read about it and forgot

it. I know that he and Sartre had a falling out, though I always assumed it

was over philosophical and political matters. Of course it is often pointed out

as one of the ironies of life that he died in a car crash while his publisher was

driving.

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French writer Albert Camus was so plagued by tuberculosis that he couldn't finish his studies for the French PhD teaching equivalent for higher education, l'agrégation.

 

As a result he couldn't make a living teaching like Sartre or Simone de Beauvoir, so he resorted to the theatre to journalism and eventually writing fiction. For that reason both of those other writers often looked down on him, especially as he disagreed with some aspects of their philosophy and their later adhearance to the Communist Party.

 

In fact, it was his tuberculosis that caused him to be in France and able to take part in the resistance-- having gone to the unoccupied zone for treatment of tuberculosis, he got stuck there.

 

But ironically, Camus died in an automobile accident and not from tuberculosis.

 

As young students studying French those early college days, the all of us were totally enamored with L'Etranger (The Stranger, no relation to the movie as is probably known here.) It was probably the first "real" and "bonafide" book in French that us newbies could actually read with some understanding. Though the subject be deep, Camus' lucid style was fairly accessible at that early level and we thrilled to it.

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I am concerned of late of words which have multiple meanings and so are nice and normal words but which some might consider to be inappropriate at any time.

 

I present for your consideration words which I can not use:

 

ajM2JT5.jpg

 

OjsrQwJ.jpg

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I remember reading The Stranger as a teenager and thinking

Wow, this is cool. The guy hangs around the beach, has a

hot girlfriend, and doesn't seem to work very much. Where

can I sign up for this existentialism jazz.

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I remember reading The Stranger as a teenager and thinking

Wow, this is cool. The guy hangs around the beach, has a

hot girlfriend, and doesn't seem to work very much. Where

can I sign up for this existentialism jazz.

 

I read Camus' L'Etranger in high school French class. Impressed me greatly but we had to write essays in French on different facets of it.

 

What I think impressed me the most was the way he drew out his characters--The descriptions, their dialogues and their lifestyles. They seemed to be Flesh and Blood people to me.

 

Vautrin-- It's a cool lifestyle until the end.

 

You did read the end, didn't you?

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I read Camus' L'Etranger in high school French class. Impressed me greatly but we had to write essays in French on different facets of it.

 

What I think impressed me the most was the way he drew out his characters--The descriptions, their dialogues and their lifestyles. They seemed to be Flesh and Blood people to me.

 

Vautrin-- It's a cool lifestyle until the end.

 

You did read the end, didn't you?

 

All except Meursault maybe, eh?

 

;)

 

--

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I read Camus' L'Etranger in high school French class. Impressed me greatly but we had to write essays in French on different facets of it.

 

What I think impressed me the most was the way he drew out his characters--The descriptions, their dialogues and their lifestyles. They seemed to be Flesh and Blood people to me.

 

Vautrin-- It's a cool lifestyle until the end.

 

You did read the end, didn't you?

Yes I did. It's a very short novel. The advantage that readers

have is that they can avoid the bone headed decisions the fictional

characters make.

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Yes I did. It's a very short novel. The advantage that readers

have is that they can avoid the bone headed decisions the fictional

characters make.

 

Yes, get in touch with your feelings and don't shoot people. A cautionary tale of the remarkably unsubtle. Oh, and honor your mother and father, especially when they have died in the last 20 minutes.

:D

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Yes, get in touch with your feelings and don't shoot people. A cautionary tale of the remarkably unsubtle. Oh, and honor your mother and father, especially when they have died in the last 20 minutes.

:D

Maybe he should have been in the Algerian equivalent of

the Boy Scouts, if there was such a thing. I haven't read

the book in a number of years, so some of the plot details

are sketchy. Maybe he wasn't careful enough to hide his

crime.

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Maybe he should have been in the Algerian equivalent of

the Boy Scouts, if there was such a thing. I haven't read

the book in a number of years, so some of the plot details

are sketchy. Maybe he wasn't careful enough to hide his

crime.

 

Careful doesn't apply here. He channeled Rhett, "Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn."

 

:o

 

=

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Yes I did. It's a very short novel. The advantage that readers

have is that they can avoid the bone headed decisions the fictional

characters make.

 

I don't think Meursault ever made any decisions about his life. He was lacksadaisical and just kind of fell into situations and relationships.

 

So much of what happened to him was the circumstance of his existence.

 

He didn't show remorse because that wasn't his personality. Remorse would have been more of a commitment than he could ever give.

 

He was a part of society but not anchored into the society.

 

I think it's only at the end of the novel that he actually takes a stand.

 

Or I should say that, Camus actually makes a personal statement of his philosophy.

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Careful doesn't apply here. He channeled Rhett, "Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn."

 

:o

 

=

He was much more indifferent to his fate than I would

have been. If you're going to do something, do it right,

though I realize that wasn't part of his view.

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I don't think Meursault ever made any decisions about his life. He was lacksadaisical and just kind of fell into situations and relationships.

 

So much of what happened to him was the circumstance of his existence.

 

He didn't show remorse because that wasn't his personality. Remorse would have been more of a commitment than he could ever give.

 

He was a part of society but not anchored into the society.

 

I think it's only at the end of the novel that he actually takes a stand.

 

Or I should say that, Camus actually makes a personal statement of his philosophy.

Perhaps this is different from Sartre, who, from what I recall,

championed the ability of the individual to consciously shape

his own life and not use the fact of circumstances to excuse

his behavior. I really don't have a dog in this fight, just laying

out the two possible positions.

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Vautrin-- and you're absolutely right. I can't tell you how many people I've met who had all kinds of degrees in French literature, yet maintained that Camus was an existentialist.

 

Not to get bogged down in it, but Camus' ideas have more to do with the absurdity of life. But he does come into the human being's engagement with life. His essay the Myth of Sisyphus best explains how he thinks. Engagement does invigorate your life, but it's useless.

 

I've also heard Camus described by my professors as being a moralist.

 

I would also recommend Camus La Peste or The Plague in terms of how he sees life engagement. And this novel is much more bleak than L'Etranger.

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Well, Princess, it has been said, "A little education is a dangerous thing."

 

And it can take many different shapes.  I'm running across some of this in relation to how my wife's stroke is being treated.

 

I've learned long ago, when my dad had his strokes that there can be many different causes of strokes.  Yet what I'm finding is that many(or most) doctors and other medical personel go about treatment as if there's only ONE cause, and try to treat all stroke victims with one generic method.  And if the patient doesn't respond to the treatment the way their TEXTBOOKS have told them they SHOULD, then they rely on some other generic template that doesn't much take into consideration the individual. I could go on more about this, but it upsets me, so I'll leave it there.

 

 

Sepiatone 

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Vautrin-- and you're absolutely right. I can't tell you how many people I've met who had all kinds of degrees in French literature, yet maintained that Camus was an existentialist.

 

Not to get bogged down in it, but Camus' ideas have more to do with the absurdity of life. But he does come into the human being's engagement with life. His essay the Myth of Sisyphus best explains how he thinks. Engagement does invigorate your life, but it's useless.

 

I've also heard Camus described by my professors as being a moralist.

 

I would also recommend Camus La Peste or The Plague in terms of how he sees life engagement. And this novel is much more bleak than L'Etranger.

Since existentialism has a number of variants, I suppose one could

make the argument that Camus was some kind of existentialist, if

not Sartre's type. I wouldn't make it, but others likely would. I haven't

read The Plague in years and it's been even longer for Sisyphus.

The Fall, while the subject matter is serious, seems more lighthearted in

tone and more comic than the other two novels.

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