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CaveGirl

Very Strange Movies

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I am attracted to very strange movies, so I use that term not as a pejorative.

 

One of my favorites is, "The Saragossa Manuscript". Based on the tale from the early 1800's called "The Manuscript Found in Saragoss" written by Jan Potocki, the film version by Wojciech Has is like an extended dream with no resolution
 

Characters keep showing up and disappearing, the storyline seems to have little real progression and the film is a bit like seeing Don Quixote on crack, travel around the countryside but it is still a very engrossing and entertaining film.

 

Not perhaps as strange as the cult film, "Equinox" but enjoyable nonetheless.

 

If you can add some very strange films to my list of ones to look for, it would be appreciated.

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Incubus - William Shatner in Esperanto

 

Dementia aka Daughter of Horror

 

Gummo

 

Zardoz

 

El Topo

 

Songs from the Second Floor

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Incubus - William Shatner in Esperanto

 

Dementia aka Daughter of Horror

 

Gummo

 

Zardoz

 

El Topo

 

Songs from the Second Floor

Incubus - William Shatner in Esperanto [seen it and own it]

Dementia aka Daughter of Horror  [seen it and own it]

Gummo  [seen it]

Zardoz  [seen it]

El Topo  [seen it and own it]

 

Songs from the Second Floor  [Guess what; haven't seen it!]

 

Yippee, one more strange film to add to my list. Thanks, Lawrence and by the way all the others truly are wonderfully "strange"!

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Black Moon (Louis Malle)

 

The Exterminating Angel  (Luis Bunuel)

 

(My strange films have to be directed by people named Looey.)

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Black Moon (Louis Malle)

 

The Exterminating Angel  (Luis Bunuel)

 

(My strange films have to be directed by people named Looey.)

Hmmm, did you by chance ever date someone named Louis Renault, Miss Wonderly?

 

I hear he was French Canadian.

 

Thanks for the great additions to my strange list! I love "TEA" by the way.

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I haven't seen much Buñuel, but I'd mention The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie.

 

Just Imagine is strange, if only for everything they try to shoehorn into the movie

 

Martha Ivers' love seems perfectly normal by comparison.

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I take it this is about GOOD strange movies, and not Chevy Chase in "Modern Problems" or the Robert Zemeckis "A Christmas Carol".

Wow, were those disturbing fever dreams.   :blink:

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I haven't seen much Buñuel, but I'd mention The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie.

 

Just Imagine is strange, if only for everything they try to shoehorn into the movie

 

Martha Ivers' love seems perfectly normal by comparison.

Hey, Fedya, of course I've seen the Bunuel film but I had forgotten all about "Just Imagine" and have always wanted to see it.

 

I need to go find a dvd copy hopefully as it sounds fascinating.

 

And yes, Martha's love was rather strange.

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I take it this is about GOOD strange movies, and not Chevy Chase in "Modern Problems" or the Robert Zemeckis "A Christmas Carol".

Wow, were those disturbing fever dreams.   :blink:

Good strange or bad strange, doesn't matter.

 

I could like either, if they are really outre.

 

Thanks, Eric!

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I believe that you might find: Kondom des Grauens (1996) a bit bizarre. I can write little of it here because: Mr. Otto Censor would asterisk-out many words. You may find a sense of it in the summary and comments here:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116791/?ref_=nv_sr_1

 

I find: House (1977) quite unconventional.

 

I believe that: The Nude Vampire (1970) one of the more interesting surreal-vampire movies.

 

I find: Pleasures of the Flesh (1965) to be an odd little movie.

 

You need only look at list of movies which were produced and/or distributed by: Troma Entertainment to find a wealth of unconventional movies.

http://www.imdb.com/company/co0019150/?ref_=ttco_co_11

 

Among my favorite: Troma movies are:

 

A Nymphoid Barbarian in Dinosaur Hell (1990)

Ferocious Female Freedom Fighters (1982)
Surf Nazis Must Die (1987)
Dialing for Dingbats (1989) I find this an absolute treasure of oddity!
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I believe that you might find: Kondom des Grauens (1996) a bit bizarre. I can write little of it here because: Mr. Otto Censor would asterisk-out many words. You may find a sense of it in the summary and comments here:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116791/?ref_=nv_sr_1

 

I find: House (1977) quite unconventional.

 

I believe that: The Nude Vampire (1970) one of the more interesting surreal-vampire movies.

 

I find: Pleasures of the Flesh (1965) to be an odd little movie.

 

You need only look at list of movies which were produced and/or distributed by: Troma Entertainment to find a wealth of unconventional movies.

http://www.imdb.com/company/co0019150/?ref_=ttco_co_11

 

Among my favorite: Troma movies are:

 

A Nymphoid Barbarian in Dinosaur Hell (1990)

Ferocious Female Freedom Fighters (1982)
Surf Nazis Must Die (1987)
Dialing for Dingbats (1989) I find this an absolute treasure of oddity!

 

As usual, SF you have come up with some stunners.

 

I have seen "Surf Nazis Must Die" and own "House" which is visually rather out of this world, and a couple more of the Troma ones.

 

But I shall certainly look for your other choices and thanks for the most esoteric list!

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In the immortal words of Monty Python, and now for something completely different: films that range from a bit weird, to artsy, to bad to a touch odd.

 

The Color Of Pomegranates (1968): directed by Sergei Parajanov, this visually fascinating film explores obscure (to me) references to Armenian culture and history.

 

The Ballad Of Tam Lin (1970): Roddy McDowall directed this film based on the Scottish legend, starring Ava Gardner, with Joanna Lumely in a bit part, the soundtrack captures the brief popularity of British Folk Music featuring the music of The Pentangle.

 

Peau d'âne (1971): a musical directed by Jacques Demy, starring Catherine Deneuve as a young princess who escapes her father’s, Jean Marais, demands to marry him, by adopting the hide of a donkey.

 

Le Orme (1974): directed by Luigi Bazzoni and referred to as giallo, the plot explores subjects not usually found in the genre, and without the requisite violence, but stands up to repeated viewing.

 

Uncle Boonmee: Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010): directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul this visually stunning film explores obscure (again to me) references to Thai culture and history.

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I find: House (1977) quite unconventional.

 

The unrelated 1986 House, with William Katt and George Wendt, while not Japanese-commercial psychedelic, is a little more creepy, abstract and mind-futzing than its 80's-B-movie appearance might at first suggest...

 

Peau d'âne (1971): a musical directed by Jacques Demy, starring Catherine Deneuve as a young princess who escapes her father’s, Jean Marais, demands to marry him, by adopting the hide of a donkey.

 

Otherwise known as Donkey Skin, which you can now stream on HuluPlus's Criterion collection, along with one or two other classic-fairytale movies Jacques Demy tried to update for the whimsical 70's hippie ethic.

It's cute, visually stylized and not as heretically off the original fairytale as it sounds--More like a French version of "The Slipper and the Rose".

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"An Andalusian Dog" (1929).

 

"Strange Cargo" (1940).

 

"Yolanda and the Thief" (1945)--The dream ballet is based on images from Buneul (sp?) and Dali.

 

'Sylvia Scarlett" (1935)--Gender bending film with Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant.

 

"Last Year at Marienbad" (1962)--View at your own risk.  I hated the film except for the matchstick game.  Slow, strange, and Boring--some critics loved the film (I'm trying to be fair to the film--I must have missed something(s) when I saw it, a Long time ago).

 

"The Gang's All Here" (1943)--Busby Berkeley directed musical that's in it's own Universe, and is one of my musical favorites--I almost laughed myself into an asthma attack when I watched it.

 

"Hercules and the Haunted World" (1962)--Mario Bava directed mix of the horror and "sword and sandals" genres--odd but very watchable film. 

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"The Gang's All Here" (1943)--Busby Berkeley directed musical that's in it's own Universe, and is one of my musical favorites--I almost laughed myself into an asthma attack when I watched it.

 

 

Filmie, that's hilarious; this could be the new standard, replace the tomatoes with numbers of asthma attacks a film induces. The scene of the floating head singing Brazil in the opening of the film reminds me of Terry Gilliam's Brazil (1985), or any film by the director. Derek Jarman's films also tend to be on the surreal end of the spectrum; Tilda Swinton as Lady Ottoline Morrell in Wittgenstein (1993) is classic Jarman.

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...

 

The Exterminating Angel  (Luis Bunuel)

 

(My strange films have to be directed by people named Looey.)

 

The Exterminating Angel...  I came across this by sheer luck while flipping channels one evening. It was not far from the beginning and I was captivated. Nothing was happening, really, except in my imagination. Excellent.

________________

 

I find I must add to this list: Wild Strawberries (1957) by Ingmar Bergman

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whistlinggypsy--on that scale, 1962's "The Witch's Curse" is a must.  Mixes the traditional horror film with the "sword and sandals" genre.  Are at least three major howlers in the film.  Is on YouTube.  Is too strange (and funny) to give away the plot.  For those in the mood to see a weird film.

 

"The Cobweb" (1955)--Only film I know of where the crisis is precipitated by needing a new pair of drapes.

 

"The Shooting" (1967)*--allegorical Western scheduled for late this month.  People love or hate the film.

 

"The Great Gabbo" (1929)--Erich von Stroheim as a crazy ventriloquist--has some of the Oddest musical numbers of 1929.  Was on YouTube.  Foreshadows "Dead of Night" (1946).

 

*--TCM's release date for this film is 1972.

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Here's 2....

 

dollhouse1.jpg

 

She would keep psychiatrist well fed. :wacko:

WELCOME-TO-THE-DOLLHOUSE-image-welcome-t

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

wumo7b.jpg

 

Mom is a basket case.

 

4179315_l1.jpg

 

 

Poor girls, rather be a million miles away.

 

25560.jpg

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Strange, and bad. After the glories of "If" and "O Lucky Man", Lindsay Anderson's trilogy really hit rock bottom with "Britannia Hospital" [1982]. Despite a stellar cast and a decent soundtrack by the talented Alan Price, the screenplay by David Sherwin was a political manifesto, not entertainment.

 

Strange and good: Peter Greenaway's bizarrely magnificent "The Draughtsman's Contract" [also 1982, oddly enough].

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The Color Of Pomegranates (1968): directed by Sergei Parajanov, this visually fascinating film explores obscure (to me) references to Armenian culture and history.

 

 

I like this movie very much! I find his work very compelling. I would recommend also: Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (1965).

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I just saw this on my Directv guide, never heard of it before.  Seems odd enough, Scrooge time travels 170 years into the future and meets Timothy Cratchit the VI, the great, great, great grandson of Bob Cratchit.

 

Guess they got bored with remakes / reboots. :blink:

 

Mr%2BScrooge%2Bto%2BSee%2BYou!.png

 

 

(forgot the Christmas in July stuff)

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As usual, SF you have come up with some stunners.

 

 

I will patronize my ego by assuming that you mean that in good way. ;)

 

I find that I forgot to include: The Pillow Book (1996). There is overt surrealism but I find it is much more than that if you are in mood to identify strongly with the character. I believe it is rare for any movie to celebrate so enthusiastically the pleasures of: calligraphy. 

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Dark_Shadows_40.jpg

 

This is the only one I can think of at the moment. It's Tim Burton; it may not be the kind of "strange" you're thinking of lol 

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CRASH (1996...and not to be confused with the 2004 Best Picture Oscar winner of the same name)

 

crash-927169409-large.jpg

 

 

Basically, just about the weirdest "How To Get Your Sexual Mojo Back After Sustaining Debilitating Auto Crash Injuries" instructional you're ever likely to see!

 

(...but then again, David Cronenberg would probably be one of the last people, say the Disney Company for instance, would ever ask to direct any of their mainstream films, ya know)

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