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CaveGirl

Tomwomen in the Movies

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As we all know, women being the free spirits they are who cannot be bound by convention, have since time immemorial worn pretty much whatever they wanted in terms of clothing.

 

I'm sure even cave women, of whom I am the progeny, would not have allowed a tiger skin to become a uniform for eons, if they wanted to wear a leopard sarong or hot pants instead.

 

Poor men, being the easily led folks they are, allow themselves to be restricted in what they wear, and walk around in suits and with little ties on their white shirts without hardly ever complaining or picketing this abomination.

 

But I digress, since my post is really about women in the movies, who never outgrew their tomboy tendencies and always dress in this style. Now some women like Nancy Culp tend to always look tomboyish even in a dress, but I'm wondering who else do you think in films often affected a tomwoman look in her dress and manner.

 

Now as we also all know, a girl who is a tomboy is not necessarily like a boy in all ways, and can later turn out to be the belle of the ball. All it means is that women, being unable to be tamed wear what they like and can use items that would be thought of as for men as well as women, in their daily lives whereas men are bound by ancient conventions and can't.

 

Name some film tomwomen please!

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Katharine Hepburn in "Spitfire" (1934) and "Pat and Mike" (1952).

 

Betty Hutton in "Annie Get Your Gun" (1950).

 

Debbie Reynolds in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" (1964).

 

Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar" (1954).

 

Barbara Stanwyck in "The Furies" (1950), "Escape to Burma" (1955), and "Forty Guns" (1957).

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Katharine Hepburn in "Spitfire" (1934) and "Pat and Mike" (1952).

 

Betty Hutton in "Annie Get Your Gun" (1950).

 

Debbie Reynolds in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" (1964).

 

Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar" (1954).

 

Barbara Stanwyck in "The Furies" (1950), "Escape to Burma" (1955), and "Forty Guns" (1957).

You read my mind, FL because seeing Betty Hutton in AGYG is what made me think about Tomwomen!

 

She's such a grown up tomboy in that film, but she also does clean up well. Not many actresses would have been willing to dress down like that with no make-up I think.

 

Your other choices are fab also!

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This calls to my mind my insignificant other's favorite example re: sexual inequality: "A woman can put on jeans, hiking boots, and a flannel shirt and go anywhere without anyone noticing. But if a man, just once, makes a fast trip to the grocery store while wearing his blue chiffon, he's marked for life."

 

I believe that: Marlene Dietrich is prime example of woman rocking men's clothes. She was dressed as man in much of: The Ship of Lost Men (1929). She made sensation also in: 1932 by being seen and photographed in tuxedo: "Marlene Dietrich certainly started something when she appeared at the opening of  The Sign of the Cross, wearing a masculine tuxedo, wing collar, soft felt hat, mannish topcoat, and a pair of mannish patent leather shoes!" http://glamourdaze.com/2014/06/1930s-fashion-the-year-of-wearing-trousers-1932.html

 

gVGsOIJ.jpg

 

Greta Garbo wore also men's clothing much in: Queen Christina (1933)

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Of course, Doris Day in "Calamity Jane", and Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall" would qualify.  I believe that Diane dressed like that in everyday life.

 

       

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Of course, Doris Day in "Calamity Jane", and Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall" would qualify. I believe that Diane dressed like that in everyday life.

 

Miles-- I had the same idea.

 

It was said that Katharine Hepburn was the woman who popularized pants for all women.

 

My favorite story about Kate and her pants was in Paris.

 

One of the swankiest hotels in Paris is called George V. After the war Spencer Tracy was staying there for a period and Katharine Hepburn was visiting him. The management was so excited about the way she looked that they wouldn't allow her to walk through the lobby. She had to come in the back way.

 

When I think of the management of this hotel, I think of the Hotel Management in the movie Top Hat. It must have been very funny.

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This calls to my mind my insignificant other's favorite example re: sexual inequality: "A woman can put on jeans, hiking boots, and a flannel shirt and go anywhere without anyone noticing. But if a man, just once, makes a fast trip to the grocery store while wearing his blue chiffon, he's marked for life."

 

I believe that: Marlene Dietrich is prime example of woman rocking men's clothes. She was dressed as man in much of: The Ship of Lost Men (1929). She made sensation also in: 1932 by being seen and photographed in tuxedo: "Marlene Dietrich certainly started something when she appeared at the opening of  The Sign of the Cross, wearing a masculine tuxedo, wing collar, soft felt hat, mannish topcoat, and a pair of mannish patent leather shoes!" http://glamourdaze.com/2014/06/1930s-fashion-the-year-of-wearing-trousers-1932.html

 

gVGsOIJ.jpg

 

Greta Garbo wore also men's clothing much in: Queen Christina (1933)

Hi, SansFin!

 

Good choice and when Marlena wore a tuxedo, she wore it well.

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Of course, Doris Day in "Calamity Jane", and Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall" would qualify.  I believe that Diane dressed like that in everyday life.

Diane did have her own unique look which did incorporate many male clothing elements. The ties, the hats and all. 

Thanks, Miles and is your wife still cheating on you?

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Miles-- I had the same idea.

 

It was said that Katharine Hepburn was the woman who popularized pants for all women.

 

My favorite story about Kate and her pants was in Paris.

 

One of the swankiest hotels in Paris is called George V. After the war Spencer Tracy was staying there for a period and Katharine Hepburn was visiting him. The management was so excited about the way she looked that they wouldn't allow her to walk through the lobby. She had to come in the back way.

 

When I think of the management of this hotel, I think of the Hotel Management in the movie Top Hat. It must have been very funny.

Great story, Princess!

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Now as we also all know, a girl who is a tomboy is not necessarily like a boy in all ways, and can later turn out to be the belle of the ball. 

 

 

Oh, like Caitlin Clarke when she stops disguising herself as a boy in Dragonslayer (1981), you mean?

 

Then again, there's always Princess Yuki in Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress (1958), long before Leia made it cool.  

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Diane did have her own unique look which did incorporate many male clothing elements. The ties, the hats and all. 

Thanks, Miles and is your wife still cheating on you?

I don't know, CaveGirl.  I wasn't around long enough to find out.  I was doing a job for a dame, tailing a guy named Thursby, and that's the last thing I remember.  By the way, my image of you is that you probably look like Imogene Coca in the TV show  "It's About Time".

 

Imogene_Coca_Joe_E._Ross_Its_About_Time_

 

Ooh, Ooh, am I right?

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On Tuesday, July 12, 2016 at 3:42 PM, film lover 293 said:

Katharine Hepburn in "Spitfire" (1934) and "Pat and Mike" (1952).

 

Betty Hutton in "Annie Get Your Gun" (1950).

 

Debbie Reynolds in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" (1964).

 

Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar" (1954).

 

Barbara Stanwyck in "The Furies" (1950), "Escape to Burma" (1955), and "Forty Guns" (1957).

Barbara Stanwyck in "Annie Oakley" also was pretty tough and tomwoman like with her shootin skills and joining the boys. Also Katharine Hepburn often looked sorta tomwoman like with her being one of the few 1930s women often keen on wearing long pants or trousers.

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On 7/12/2016 at 4:42 PM, film lover 293 said:

Katharine Hepburn in "Spitfire" (1934) and "Pat and Mike" (1952).

 

Betty Hutton in "Annie Get Your Gun" (1950).

 

Debbie Reynolds in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" (1964).

 

Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar" (1954).

 

Barbara Stanwyck in "The Furies" (1950), "Escape to Burma" (1955), and "Forty Guns" (1957).

doris day in calamity jane.

:D

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7 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

Mercedes McCambridge in GIANT.

or johnny guitar

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21 minutes ago, sagebrush said:

Mercedes McCambridge in GIANT.

Only Giant?  :lol:

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Well, Katharine Hepburn had no choice in the 1935 film, "Sylvia Scarlett." If I'm correct, her plan is to dress like a boy in order to have more options to help her father earn money (since he's in hock up to his ears or something). 

Image result for katharine hepburn sylvia scarlett

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7 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

Well, Katharine Hepburn had no choice in the 1935 film, "Sylvia Scarlett." If I'm correct, her plan is to dress like a boy in order to have more options to help her father earn money (since he's in hock up to his ears or something). 

Image result for katharine hepburn sylvia scarlett

I was just thinking of SYLVIA SCARLETT myself.

I was a bit of a tomboy myself, in fact I still am. Won't dress up unless it's for a special occasion, and I hate wearing makeup and avoid it when I can.

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On 4/8/2018 at 10:59 AM, NipkowDisc said:

doris day in calamity jane.

:D

 

On 4/8/2018 at 11:00 AM, NipkowDisc said:

or johnny guitar

Come on Nip, this isn't a deep thread to plow through.
film lover 293, already mentioned Johnny Guitar in the 4th post,
AND MilesArcher added Calamity Jane in the 7th post....

Why not add something original like Debbie Reynolds in Goodbye Charlie (1964), released the same year as  The Unsinkable Molly Brown. A hilarious (for its day) gender switching karma comedy co-starring Tony Curtis. :)

(just in case CG should be lurking :ph34r: and maybe decide one day to resume posting here... ever hopeful :wub:)

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I got some!...

the widow hudspeth's daughters in friendly persuasion.

:D

Related image

Related image

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