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Mary Tyler Moore Appreciation Thread

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Recently other posters were talking about the Mary Tyler Moore Show and how great it was. I only saw it first run, remembered it being good, but mostly forgotten individual story lines. So I've been binge-watching each season from my local library.

 

I am blown away by how great the writing/acting/production is on that show. But mostly, I am super impressed with Mary Tyler Moore herself.

 

MTM first broke out as Laura Petrie in THE DICK VAN DYKE show, quickly learning comedy timing (from the best!) and acing it. A short 5 years later she was carrying her OWN SHOW.

 

And her movie work, especially THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE and ORDINARY PEOPLE was also excellent, outstanding. MTM went from adorable to admirable, both in charactors and in real life.

I truly believe the person you see on screen often reflects the person in real life. I think MTM is hard working, uber intelligent (a quick study) innovative and TALENTED. Although she may come across as egotistical, it's just the other side of the self confidence needed to perform as well as she does.

 

Her wiki page states: "In October 2015, Moore's former co-star Dick Van Dyke said on an episode of  Larry King Now that Moore was in poor health and unable to communicate."

 

This saddens me, she's just 80 years old. She has brought so many millions of people such joy for so many decades. But she herself, has faced poor health (and tragedy) most of her life. 

 

While viewing the show, as well as reading her autobiography AFTER ALL, I am struck by the idea that we're just not seeing entertainers with this sort of talent these days. 

 
I'd like to send appreciation to Mary Tyler Moore and the incredible talent she graced us with. 
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Tiki,

 

I've been meaning to respond to this for a couple days now and I finally got a chance.  

 

I love Mary Tyler Moore.

 

I remember watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show on Nick at Nite.  That is where I first learned of Mary and her fantastic television show.  'Mary' and 'Lucy' are my two favorite shows of all time and the two ladies' comedy styles couldn't be more different, yet both women were innovative forces in television.

 

Mary's comedy is much less broad and more subtle than Lucy's.  Much of her comedy comes from situations where she is embarrassed.  What I also appreciate about Mary and The Mary Tyler Moore Show is how excellent the writing and character development are.  I can't think of another show where the characters' backgrounds are so well fleshed out.  It wasn't just the "Mary Show."  It was a true ensemble piece and it goes to show what kind of person Mary was that she allowed each actor to have his or her chance in the spotlight.  She didn't need to be the center of every episode.

 

What I also love about her namesake sitcom is how well they meshed drama with comedy.  The show wasn't one wisecrack or physical pratfall after another (a la The Dick Van Dyke Show, though I enjoy that show as well).  Mary Tyler Moore and Ed Asner (along with the other cast members, but I think Moore and Asner were the most gifted at this) were fantastic when it came to playing more serious storylines.  One example I can think of is the famous "Chuckles Bites the Dust" episode.  The beginning of the episode has Mary incensed at her co-workers for their insensitive and somewhat morbid jokes about Chuckles' demise (he was dressed as "Peter the Peanut" and was shelled by a rogue elephant in a parade).  At the funeral, the gang are properly solemn, except for Mary.  She starts realizing the humor in the situation and in response to the preacher's eulogy where he talks about Chuckles' motto ("A little song, a little dance, a little seltzer in your pants") and other aspects of Chuckles' life, she starts giggling.  The preacher encourages her to laugh, and she ends up sobbing. 

 

Another plot device that this show used well was having a emotional moment end with a funny moment.  In the episode where Edie Grant remarries, there is a very tense moment where Lou watches his ex-wife (a divorce that he did not want) remarry.  Mary is worried that Lou will make a scene or that he won't be able to handle watching his wife's wedding.  Lou makes it through like a trouper and tells Mary that he wants to talk to Edie.  "You're going to do that too?!" Mary says, adoringly, as if she cannot believe how Lou is handling the situation.  He graciously wishes Edie good luck with her new marriage.  It's a bittersweet moment for Lou.  He knows now that there is no chance of reconciling with Edie.  Mary, completely overcome and in awe of how Lou handled the wedding starts sobbing and Lou ends up consoling her.

 

Another thing I really liked about Mary's portrayal of Mary Richards was that the character grew throughout the duration of the show.  In the first season, Mary was a naive and a bit wishy washy.  She was afraid of upsetting anyone.  She didn't know how to stand up for herself.  She was unsure of her role at WJM.  As the show progressed, Mary grew into her Associate Producer role and demonstrated a real knack for her position.  She learned how to stand up for herself as evidenced by her many relationships throughout the years.  She was more assertive and really came into herself.  The Mary of 1970 was a young woman who had recently broken off an engagement.  She was new to "the big city" without knowing anyone in town.  She was in Minneapolis to make a fresh, new start.  Fast forward seven years later to the Mary of 1977, and she's a confident, successful independent woman with many friends.  She is happy in her own skin and sure of herself.  

 

My favorite 'Mary' episode is "Put on a Happy Face" from Season Three.  Mary Tyler Moore gives a tour de force performance.  This episode is hilarious.  Mary Richards, a woman who for the most part seems to have everything going for her, has one of the worst weeks ever: she gets a coffee stain on her new blouse due to a broken mug; she finds out that she accidentally threw out the obituaries folder instead of the obsolete clippings folder.  Per Mr. Grant, she now has to spend her free time replacing the content of that folder; she ends up with a "hair bump" and while walking down the freshly waxed hallway to the bathroom to fix said hair bump, she falls and sprains her foot; back at home, while soaking her foot, she gets a bad cold from soaking her foot; she can't find a date for the upcoming Teddy Awards banquet, and Ted ends up tricking her into taking him; the cleaners ruins her dress; she drops her phone in her foot water; she gets a run in her nylons while getting ready the banquet; her hair dryer breaks; she has to wear a yellow raincoat to the banquet because it starts raining and she'd forgotten her umbrella at work; she has to wear one slipper and one dress shoe to the banquet because of her swollen foot and ends up stepping in a rain puddle in her slipper foot.  Her false eyelash falls off at the banquet table.  Finally, the piece de resistance, she wins the Teddy Award she was nominated for and has to go up on stage in front of the whole crowd, and she's a mess.  Sobbing, sneezing, apologizing, poor Mary.  Something good happens to her (she wins the award), but she's so miserable that it's probably the one time you would want to not win the award if you were in Mary's shoes.  Then, of course, her name is misspelled on her award. 

 

Yay for Mary! I'm sorry to hear that she is in such poor health.  She has been suffering from diabetes for over forty years and unfortunately in the last decade or so, it has been especially cruel to her.  I wish her all the best.  She is truly a pioneer in television and has given so much to audiences everywhere.

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As a kid I grew up loving a number of television series but I doubt that I held any in higher esteem than The Dick Van Dyke Show. Its humour was far more sophisticated and adult than that to be found in most of the other deliberately silly comedies on the air at the time.

 

Aside from the high quality of the show's writing, however, there was the perfect casting of its stars, chief among them being Mary Tyler Moore, who was little known to the world prior to the role of Laura Petrie. She and Dick Van Dyke had great chemistry, of course, and Mary also made my heart purr whenever I saw her wearing Capri pants.

 

mary-tyler-moore-feature-2.jpg

 

But TDVDS also Mary be more than just sexy (okay, make that very sexy). It allowed the world to see that this dark haired beauty could also be a comedienne, as well. For starters, what actress cried funnier than Mary did in this show?

 

A few years after the Van Dyke show folded, Mary, of course, was able to headline her own TV show, Mary Tyler Moore (by the way that was the name of the show, not The Mary Tyler Moore Show, though that is what everyone calls it today - understandably, too, since how confusing it would be to just go by the original title - you wouldn't know if someone was referring to the show or the actress herself).

 

If anything, I gradually came to become even more fond of this show (much to my shock, I must admit) than the Van Dyke show. Again, the comedy writing was sophisticated but the characterizations were more fully rounded than in the earlier show, and, admidst the very human comedy situations that arose, there would be, as Speedracer pointed out, those moments of wonderful poignancy, as well.

 

I will admit that, only to be expected with a series that was on the air for seven seasons, MTM had its weak episodes, but the strong ones stand out for the strength of the writing and brilliance of the performances. The greatest strength of MTM in my opinion was the casting of the supporting roles, but at the same time it's apparent that Mary herself had really grown as a comedy performer with more nuanced work.

 

Mary's own favourite episode of the series was, I believe, the famous "Chuckles Bites the Dust" episode, which Speedracer so well described. But to me,in many ways, I thought that the heart of the show was in the relationship between Mary Richards and Lou Grant, her boss, magnificently portrayed as a grumpy bear with a soft centre by Ed Azner. I sometimes pondered how the Spencer Tracy of, say, Father of the Bride would have been in this same role, but Azner was glorious to behold (as, indeed, were many of the other cast members of MTM).

 

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Truth is, I always had a bit of a thing for Valerie Harper's Rhoda in this show (when she was portrayed as "overweight" and insecure and self deprecating in her barbed comments - a contrast to "perfect" Mary Richards, at least in the earlier episodes).

 

I'm genuinely saddened to hear that Mary Tyler Moore's health issues are having a heavy impact upon her these days.

 

On just Wednesday of this week, by the way, there was a hoax Facebook story put out of Mary's death, prompting hundreds of fans to send their condolences. Yesterday representatives of Mary Tyler Moore responded, "She joins the long list of celebrities who have been victimized by this hoax. She's still alive and well, stop believing what you see on the Internet."

 

I don't understand this kind of sick humour in the internet age. It is a long way from the humanitarianism that accompanied the humour to be found on The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

 

Years ago, while in a store specializing in movie nostalgia, I was fortunate enough to find and purchase this photograph, autographed by the four stars of TDVDS. The "God Bless" that accompanies Dick Van Dyke's autograph, by the way, is something that he got from Stan Laurel, who told him to always use it when giving out a signature.

 

 

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Thank you for your input Tom! I'm glad to see there is another MTM fan in our midst.  I agree that she was excellent on The Dick Van Dyke Show as Laura Petrie.  The show definitely provided on the job training and MTM was a quick learner.  She was funny on 'Dick Van Dyke' show and was able to perform physical bits as well as deliver lines well.  I wish she and Dick Van Dyke would have given lessons to the child actor who played their son Ritchie, ugh! he was terrible.  He was always YELLING HIS LINES!

 

One of my favorite Laura Petrie moments is one of the early episodes where she is worried that Rob doesn't find her attractive anymore.  Since this was the time of blonde bombshells like Marilyn Monroe and Brigitte Bardot, Laura thinks that if she dyes her dark brown hair blonde, it'll make her more enticing to Rob.  Millie helps her dye her hair blonde and it looks terrible with Laura's coloring.  She speaks to Rob on the phone to gauge his interest in blondes and Rob mentions that he thinks Laura's dark brown hair is beautiful and he wouldn't want her to look any other way.  He then says he'll be home in an hour to take Laura out for an evening on the town.  Frantic, Laura tries to get Millie to dye her hair back.  They end up having to go to multiple stores to find Laura's hair dye (or maybe Millie has to get some rush delivered, I can't remember).  When Rob arrives home, only half of Laura's hair is back to normal.

 

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She breaks out into one of her signature crying gags, mostly because she's so embarrassed about how she looks.

 

While her crying was funny on 'Dick Van Dyke' and Mary Tyler Moore, I'm glad that the Mary Richards character somewhat grew out of her crying shtick.  In the beginning seasons, Mary broke down into tears in Mr. Grant's office multiple times.  I remember thinking, "Come on Mary! Don't cry in the boss' office!" Eventually, as the Mary character grew up and grew more confident in herself, the crying gags became less and less.  

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As a kid I grew up loving a number of television series but I doubt that I held any in higher esteem than The Dick Van Dyke Show. Its humour was far more sophisticated and adult than that to be found in most of the other deliberately silly comedies on the air at the time.

 

Aside from the high quality of the show's writing, however, there was the perfect casting of its stars, chief among them being Mary Tyler Moore, who was little known to the world prior to the role of Laura Petrie. She and Dick Van Dyke had great chemistry, of course, and Mary also made my heart purr whenever I saw her wearing Capri pants.

 

 

But TDVDS also Mary be more than just sexy (okay, make that very sexy). It allowed the world to see that this dark haired beauty could also be a comedienne, as well. For starters, what actress cried funnier than Mary did in this show?

 

A few years after the Van Dyke show folded, Mary, of course, was able to headline her own TV show, Mary Tyler Moore (by the way that was the name of the show, not The Mary Tyler Moore Show, though that is what everyone calls it today - understandably, too, since how confusing it would be to just go by the original title - you wouldn't know if someone was referring to the show or the actress herself).i

 

Allan Burns, co-creator of the series, originally wanted to call the show simply MARY TYLER MOORE, but ultimately the decision was made to call it THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW. Even before the airing of the first episode it was promoted as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, as can be seen on the CBS promos that are included as bonus features on THE MTM SHOW Season 1 DVD set.

 

 

While her crying was funny on 'Dick Van Dyke' and Mary Tyler Moore, I'm glad that the Mary Richards character somewhat grew out of her crying shtick.  In the beginning seasons, Mary broke down into tears in Mr. Grant's office multiple times.  I remember thinking, "Come on Mary! Don't cry in the boss' office!" Eventually, as the Mary character grew up and grew more confident in herself, the crying gags became less and less.  

 

Mary Tyler Moore has said that she studied the work of Nanette Fabray to develop a way to "cry funny" as Laura Petrie on THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW.

In a wonderful bit of casting, Nanette Fabray would later play Mary Richards's mother on THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW.

One of the highlights of the episode "Just Around The Corner" is when Mary and her mother get into an argument that is punctuated by sniffles from Moore and Fabray.

"You've Got A Friend" ---another episode with Nanette Fabray---includes very subtle references to the fact that unmarried Mary was (gasp!) sexually active.

When Mary's mother tells  Mary's father to not forget to take his "little pill," Mary, thinking the remark is for her, answers "I won't."

This is just one example of how THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW with beautiful subtlety expressed issues of the day compared to the more in your face approach of another 1970s series ALL IN THE FAMILY. 

 

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Allan Burns, co-creator of the series, originally wanted to call the show simply MARY TYLER MOORE, but ultimately the decision was made to call it THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW. Even before the airing of the first episode it was promoted as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, as can be seen on the CBS promos that are included as bonus features on THE MTM SHOW Season 1 DVD set.

 

 

 

It's interesting that the show was promoted as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, since that is not the title of the show. Obviously, though, some viewers, at least initially, might have been confused if it had just been promoted as Mary Tyler Moore, possibly not realizing that the reference was to a new TV show, rather than the actress herself.

 

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It's interesting that the show was promoted as The Mary Tyler Moore Show, since that is not the title of the show. Obviously, though, some viewers, at least initially, might have been confused if it had just been promoted as Mary Tyler Moore, possibly not realizing that the reference was to a new TV show, rather than the actress herself.

 

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Mary Tyler Moore's name appears here as the star of the show.

It's taking the "star's name above the title" to the extreme, since the title of the show is not given.

Mary Tyler Moore is being indicated as the star of THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW.

This is similar to the way that Elizabeth Montgomery's name eventually appeared above the title of BEWITCHED.

 

Allan Burns in the commentary on the Season 1 DVD explicitly states the title of the show was THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW even though his initial idea was to call the show simply MARY TYLER MOORE .

 

At the Emmy Awards the show was always referred to as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW beginning with the awards for the show's first season. 

 

Mary Tyler Moore is credited in the opening sequence, but not in the closing credits.

In every episode the supporting actors that appear in that episode have their credit superimposed over a video clip of them.

 

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Mary Tyler Moore's name appears here as the star of the show.

It's taking the "star's name above the title" to the extreme, since the title of the show is not given.

Mary Tyler Moore is being indicated as the star of THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW.

This is similar to the way that Elizabeth Montgomery's name eventually appeared above the title of BEWITCHED.

 

Allan Burns in the commentary on the Season 1 DVD explicitly states the title of the show was THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW even though his initial idea was to call the show simply MARY TYLER MOORE .

 

At the Emmy Awards the show was always referred to as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW beginning with the awards for the show's first season. 

 

Mary Tyler Moore is credited in the opening sequence, but not in the closing credits.

In every episode the supporting actors that appear in that episode have their credit superimposed over a video clip of them.

 

 

 

Yes, I know that the show is constantly referred to as The Mary Tyler Moore Show but that image I posted are the words that appear on every episode of the series.

 

You say it's the star's name with no title given, but I believe it's the title of the show. I have never heard of a television show that does not list the show's title, such as you have suggested is the case here, Holden.

 

Ultimately, it's probably a bit silly to go on about this too much (what does it really matter?), outside of sorting out the technicality as to the real title of the show, aside from what it's best known as.

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Yes, I know that the show is constantly referred to as The Mary Tyler Moore Show but that image I posted are the words that appear on every episode of the series.

 

You say it's the star's name with no title given, but I believe it's the title of the show. I have never heard of a television show that does not list the show's title, such as you have suggested is the case here, Holden.

 

Ultimately, it's probably a bit silly to go on about this too much (what does it really matter?), outside of sorting out the technicality as to the real title of the show, aside from what it's best known as.

 

There really is no argument.

Allan Burns, who was co-creator of the show, has stated explicitly that the title of the series was THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, the network advertised the series as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW from Day 1, the series competed for awards under the title of THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW and the series was listed in TV Guide during its original broadcast run under its actual title ---THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW.

 

3robbie-mtm.jpg

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There really is no argument.

Allan Burns, who was co-creator of the show, has stated explicitly that the title of the series was THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW, the network advertised the series as THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW from Day 1, the series competed for awards under the title of THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW and the series was listed in TV Guide during its original broadcast run under its actual title ---THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW.

 

3robbie-mtm.jpg

My DVDS also say "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."  Maybe the creators thought that "Mary Tyler Moore, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show" seemed redundant. IMDB says the show is "Mary Tyler Moore" aka "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."  So perhaps everyone's right in this case.  Most people would probably say "I'm watching 'Mary Tyler Moore'" as opposed to, "I'm watching The Mary Tyler Moore Show." 

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Holden said: This is just one example of how THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW with beautiful subtlety expressed issues of the day compared to the more in your face approach of another 1970s series ALL IN THE FAMILY. 

 

Boy, you hit the nail on the head! Many, many subtleties. Almost like pre-code movies; implied but not thrown in your face.

 

TomJH: I am so jealous of that autograph! I too loved TDVD Show. Although it was a product of it's time and often just a bit sillier than TMTM Show. Rewatching TDVD Show as an adult, I discovered the greatness of Rose Marie's charactor, prompting me to search out Baby Rose Marie in old movies. What an incredible entertainer-LOVE her.

 

I think every man loved Valerie Harper as Rhoda- the smart, pretty, fun gal that EVERY man loves....only SHE doesn't know it. We all know gals like that and she was the perfect TV portrayal.

And Nancy Walker as her overbearing Jewish Mother who made her that way....another perfect portrayal that so many identify with.

 

First time around, I intensely disliked Georgia Engel as Georgette.  I thought she was playing a "dumb blonde" cloying type of charactor, but now realize she was probably one of the best "lower IQ" charactors on prime time TV. She wasn't the smartest kid in school, but instead was graced with the simplicity to see truth through the trappings. I very very much like her straight forward simplicity now viewing the show as an adult.

 

Much of Mary Tyler Moore & Valerie Harper's true selves come through in their performances, while others like Ted Knight & Georgia Engel are creating more illusion of a charactor. I would LOVE to see footage of those actors simply speaking as themselves, just to see the contrast.

(like the candid footage of Elizabeth Montgomery dressed as Serena, but not acting as Serena-wow)

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Holden said: This is just one example of how THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW with beautiful subtlety expressed issues of the day compared to the more in your face approach of another 1970s series ALL IN THE FAMILY. 

 

Boy, you hit the nail on the head! Many, many subtleties. Almost like pre-code movies; implied but not thrown in your face.

 

TomJH: I am so jealous of that autograph! I too loved TDVD Show. Although it was a product of it's time and often just a bit sillier than TMTM Show. Rewatching TDVD Show as an adult, I discovered the greatness of Rose Marie's charactor, prompting me to search out Baby Rose Marie in old movies. What an incredible entertainer-LOVE her.

 

I think every man loved Valerie Harper as Rhoda- the smart, pretty, fun gal that EVERY man loves....only SHE doesn't know it. We all know gals like that and she was the perfect TV portrayal.

And Nancy Walker as her overbearing Jewish Mother who made her that way....another perfect portrayal that so many identify with.

 

First time around, I intensely disliked Georgia Engel as Georgette.  I thought she was playing a "dumb blonde" cloying type of charactor, but now realize she was probably one of the best "lower IQ" charactors on prime time TV. She wasn't the smartest kid in school, but instead was graced with the simplicity to see truth through the trappings. I very very much like her straight forward simplicity now viewing the show as an adult.

 

Much of Mary Tyler Moore & Valerie Harper's true selves come through in their performances, while others like Ted Knight & Georgia Engel are creating more illusion of a charactor. I would LOVE to see footage of those actors simply speaking as themselves, just to see the contrast.

(like the candid footage of Elizabeth Montgomery dressed as Serena, but not acting as Serena-wow)

 

With regards to Rhoda;   I would love for my wife to have a close friend like Rhoda but I wouldn't want Rhoda to be my wife.   

 

As for Georgette;  I think Bette White did this type of character better in Golden Girls.     Regardless,  White played a much different character on the MTM show and she was a hoot.

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I love the costumes & sets of MTM show too. Both Mary's & Rhoda's clothes were perfect examples of what people wore in that time period.

 

According to AFTER ALL Moore's autobiography, her capri pants were custom made by some designer on Rodeo Dr. You could buy a matching jacket to go along with them....$100 suit. NOT what a typical housewife would be wearing. But that just goes to show you the difference between "ready to wear" and custom fitted, well designed, lined clothing.

 

(Andy Griffith's sheriff uniform was custom made & tailored by the famous designer Nudie!)

 

Has anyone ever noticed the photo of Moore's real life son Ritchie on her desk? (under the clown print and "M") It's been there since the first episode.

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...

 

Has anyone ever noticed the photo of Moore's real life son Ritchie on her desk? (under the clown print and "M") It's been there since the first episode.

 

Do you know of any connection between Mary's real life son "Ritchie" and her TV son Richie?

Was Richie's name chosen as a nod to "Ritchie"?

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Do you know of any connection between Mary's real life son "Ritchie" and her TV son Richie?


Was Richie's name chosen as a nod to "Ritchie"?



Pure coincidence.

MTM's son was born a few years before she was hired for DVD show. Her husband's name was "Richard".

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I knew Mary Tyler Moore from her sitcom work, and she was very good in what she did, and was one of the few performers to get to star in multiple iconic TV series. But I was truly blown away by her performance in 1980''s Ordinary People. She went beyond the surface aspect of an emotionally-withdrawn, unlikable person to show moments that revealed the sad desperation of a person incapable of processing her and her family's grief. Her character could easily have been portrayed as simply a repellent ****, but she, and director Redford, allowed just enough nuance to reveal a "villain" that was all too human. I think it's one of the best performances of the decade.

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Has anyone ever noticed the photo of Moore's real life son Ritchie on her desk? (under the clown print and "M") It's been there since the first episode.

 

Yes, I've noticed the photograph of Richie Meeker, Mary Tyler Moore's son in Mary Richards's apartment. I think the photograph is in different locations in the apartment throughout the series.

The relationship of the child in the photograph to the Mary Richards character is never explained. 

In fact, the photograph is never referenced on the show.

I think the last name Richards was chosen for Mary Tyler Moore's character because of her real life son's name. 

 

Many people think that Mary Tyler Moore used her experience with Richie's death in her portrayal of Beth in ORDINARY PEOPLE. However, Richie Meeker did not die until after filming on ORDINARY PEOPLE was completed.

Richie actually attended an early screening of the movie with his mother.

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I've been sick for a while, i'm hoping this thread isn't here cos MTM has died... is she dead? I went to Minnesota and saw the house "Mary Richard's" lived in, exteriors only of course. I love the Mary Tyler Moore show...was she the one that married Grant Tinker? Sorry I joined this thread too late, need to read more about her to refresh my memory...

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With all this love for Mary Tyler Moore here, I hope you don't mind it if I take a moment to express my appreciation over the fact that Valerie Harper is still with us. It was three years ago that it was announced that she had been given three months to live because of brain cancer.

 

In an interview last June the positive thinking Harper was still going strong, saying she exercises and eats right, has good days and bad days and wants to live to be 102. Bless her incredible courage.

 

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I've been sick for a while, i'm hoping this thread isn't here cos MTM has died... is she dead? I went to Minnesota and saw the house "Mary Richard's" lived in, exteriors only of course. I love the Mary Tyler Moore show...was she the one that married Grant Tinker? Sorry I joined this thread too late, need to read more about her to refresh my memory...

No MTM has not passed away.  Unfortunately, she's not in the best of health, but she's still with us.  Yes, she was married to Grant Tinker.  I believe he was her second husband.

 

I've seen the MTM house as well in Minneapolis.  It was for sale a few years ago.  I bet if you were to look up the address of the house on Zillow, you could probably see the interiors.  I remember seeing them when an article came out stating that the house was for sale. 

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Tom, thank you for posting that wonderful picture of Valerie Harper.  I remember reading about her terminal diagnosis, and being very sad.  No!! Not Rhoda! But congratulations to her that she was able to find a treatment that seems to be working for her and is keeping her active.  She was on "Dancing With the Stars" a couple years ago (she's probably one of the few actual stars who has ever appeared on the show).  I'm sure she did it just to see if she could. She's also been active in the theater performing in plays.  Congrats Valerie and I hope she makes it to 102. 

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Haha just finished season 4, starting season 5. There were 2 separate references to the Ty-D-Bowl man.....I wondered if any of you "youngsters" know who the Ty-D-Bol man was and what he looked like?

 

 

It was SO MUCH a part of 60's/70's TV commercials, just like Mr Whipple squeezing the Charmin. Brand name recognition advertising was so strong back then. 

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Lol.  I was watching Season 4 today too.  I am watching season 5 as well.  I'm at the episode where Ted ends up injured after Lou throws him through a door.

 

I've seen so many of these episodes multiple times and I never tire of it.

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Haha just finished season 4, starting season 5. There were 2 separate references to the Ty-D-Bowl man.....I wondered if any of you "youngsters" know who the Ty-D-Bol man was and what he looked like?

 

 

It was SO MUCH a part of 60's/70's TV commercials, just like Mr Whipple squeezing the Charmin. Brand name recognition advertising was so strong back then. 

I've actually seen this commercial before! I saw it on TVLand back when TVLand didn't suck and they used to play old commercials between their classic programming.  I see that there is a watermark in the corner of the You Tube video that says "TVLand."

 

I don't remember ever seeing any Ty-D-Bowl man commercials in the 80s/90s though.  I only saw it on TVLand.

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Sad to here about Mary Tyler Moore's health. I too loved her in the two classic sitcoms, both having great writing and amazing ensemble playing.

 

Mary had another, short-lived sitcom, in the 1980s. It too was smart and funny, but didn't catch on. Or else it was scheduled against heavy competition and the ratings were not what the network hoped. Oh well.

 

I agree with Tom as to how sexy Laura Petrie was. What I remember best were some black tights....whoo boy!

 

Anyway, please get better Mary. You've brought us a lifetime of great moments and memories.

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