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"In the Spotlight"

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Mongol

you data on ms Revere Was great. I liked her in National Velvet and The Thin Man goes Home.Like I said before It's pretty rotten when another fellow actor will turn on another so they will make themselves look good and especially nothing was proved. I think she deserves her star on the walk of fame like any one else.The one;'s that do not deserve it are their fellow turncoats.

As You Do A great Job

Christine

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Mongo:

 

Thanks for the bit on Duryea. Another poster and I had a grand time talking about him last summer. It's too bad (almost) that he didn't get to play regular guys more often. He excelled at playing slimy bad guys. I remember seeing him in an episode of "Bonanza" and it turned out to be the same old Dan. Which is still pretty good Dan.

 

Chris

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Chris, I recall those posts about Duryea. I also enjoyed when the actor played a regular guy, especially in "Kathy O" with Jan Sterling.

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Christine, the time of the so called 'witch hunts' in Hollywood was a very bleak era.

Many performers and their families suffered the brunt of the HUAC.

Unfortunately the talented Miss Revere was one of them.

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Mongo:

 

Sometime in the future, would you do a little thing on 'where are they now' on two of my favorite 'noir' actresses? Jane Greer and Marsha Hunt, especially Marsha who was caught up so unfairly in the HUAC. Any mention of that time still burns my blood, because so many were harmed, who we might still be enjoying today. Unfortunately, I have to admit, I probably would have been one of the ones remaining seated during the Elia Kazan tribute a few years ago at the Oscar awards show. And also unfortunately, my estimation of Ronald Reagan, and Bob Taylor has slipped a little since learning of their contributions.

 

Anne

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Anne, I'm sorry to report that the lovely Jane Greer passed away in 2001 of cancer at age 76.

At 89 Marsha Hunt is still active, attends Nostalgia events, and is looking swell.

 

I agree with you about Elia Kazan. Also feel the same way about Lee J. Cobb who took the the actions to save his butt.

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Mongo:

 

This has always bothered me, and if you don't want to take up space on this thread, feel free to P.M. me instead.

 

I know the House on Unamerican Activities Committee (HUAC) was a government sponsored forum, but why was it allowed to threaten jail and/or repossession of goods when a person claimed the Fifth? The amendment clearly states that a citizen need not impugn himself or others when it could cause detriment to their life, liberty or the pursuit of happiness. Was it just another blight on our government workings and how did McCarthy come to such power as a Senator to be able to disregard a fact of the Bill of Rights?

 

Anne

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Mrs. I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one to feel that way about Ronald Reagen and the rest as far as I'm concern Elia Kazan did not deserve to be recognized. Did you also know that Frank Sinatra to star and produce in TheExecution Of PrivateSlovik So when John Wayne found out that Frank hired a blacklisted writer named Albert MaltzHe mounted press campaign against the film. so Frank never made it. I use to have a lot of respect mr. Wayne but it has dwindled since reading that.and also The other thread on this board you had posted. You made a very good point about people's rights

Christine

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In the Spolight: Lizabeth Scott

 

Beautiful blue-eyed blonde Lizabeth Scott (born September 29, 1922) is an actress who achieved some success in films, particularly in the genre of film noir.

 

She was born Emma Matzo in Scranton, Pennsylvania, the daughter of John and Mary Matzo, Roman Catholic immigrants from Slovakia. She attended Central High School and Marywood College.

 

She later went to New York City and attended the Alvienne School of Drama. In late 1942, she was eking out a precarious living with a small Midtown Manhattan summer stock company when she got a job as understudy for Tallulah Bankhead in Thornton Wilder's play "The Skin of Our Teeth". However, Scott never had an opportunity to substitute for Bankhead.

 

When Miriam Hopkins was signed to replace Bankhead, Scott quit and returned to her drama studies and some fashion modeling. She then received a call that Gladys George, who was signed to replace Hopkins, was ill, and Scott was needed back at the theatre. She then went on in the leading role of "Sabina", receiving a nod of approval from critics at the tender age of 20. The following night, George was out again and Scott went on in her place.

 

Soon afterward, Scott was at the Stork Club when motion picture producer Hal Wallis asked who she was, unaware that an aide had already arranged an interview with her for the following day. When Scott returned home however, she found a telegram offering her the lead for the Boston run of "The Skin of Our Teeth". She could not turn it down. She sent Wallis her apologies and went on the road.

 

Though the Broadway production, in which she was credited as "Girl," christened her "Elizabeth," she dropped the "e" the day after the opening night in Boston, "just to be different."

 

A photograph of Scott in Harper's Bazaar magazine was seen by movie agent Charles Feldman. He admired the fashion pose and took her on as a client. Scott made her first screen test at Warner Brothers, where she and Hal Wallis finally met. Though the test was bad, he recognized her potential. As soon as he set up shop at Paramount, she was signed to a contract. Her movie debut was in "You Came Along" (1945) opposite Robert Cummings.

 

Paramount publicity dubbed Scott "The Threat," in order to create an onscreen persona for her similar to Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake. Scott's smoky sensuality and husky-voice lent itself to the film noir genre and, beginning with "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" (1946) starring Barbara Stanwyck and Van Heflin, the studio cast her in a series of thrillers.

 

The dark blonde actress was initially compared to Bacall because of a slight resemblance and a similar voice, even more so after she starred with Bacall's husband, Humphrey Bogart, in the 1947 noir thriller "Dead Reckoning". The movie was the first of many femme fatale roles for Scott.

 

She also starred in "Desert Fury" (1947), a noir filmed in Technicolor, with John Hodiak, Burt Lancaster, Wendell Corey, and Mary Astor. In it, she played Paula Haller, who, on her return from college, falls for gangster Eddie Mannix (Hodiak), and faces a great deal of opposition from the others. Scott was paired with Lancaster, Corey, and Kirk Douglas in Hal Wallis'"I Walk Alone" (1948), a noirish story of betrayal and vengeance.

 

After being known professionally as Lizabeth Scott for 4 1/2 years, she appeared at the courthouse in Los Angeles, on October 20, 1949, and had her name legally changed.

 

Scott never married or had children. True or false, rumors and allegations concerning her sexual preferences began. In 1955, she hired famed attorney Jerry Giesler and sued Confidential Magazine for $2,500,000 in libel damages.

According to Diana McClellan's book on Sappho Hollywood, "The Girls," Scott was shunned late in the studio era for her sexual orientation. It was seen as an obscenity for Scott to be associated with lesbians as well as lesbian night clubs and dives in Los Angeles.

 

She charged that the September issue implied that she was "prone to indecent, illegal and highly offensive acts in her private and public life"; "These implications," Scott said, "are willfully, wrongfully, maliciously and completely without truth.". However, her case was thrown out on a technicality and she chose to drop the issue.

 

After completing "Loving You" (1957), Elvis Presley's second movie, Scott retired from the screen. She occasionally guest starred on television however for several years.

 

In 1972, she made one final motion picture appearance, in "Pulp" with Michael Caine and Mickey Rooney.

 

Since then, she has retreated from public view and has declined all interview requests.

 

Lizabeth Scott has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to Motion Pictures at 1624 Vine Street in Hollywood.

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Mongo, Another great "Spotlight" Love her, her voice, and her acting. Shame what the public can do for a career. Great in "I Walk Alone", Desert Fury (as mentioned) and "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" I remembered seeing a picture once of the New Stars of 1947 with Scott, Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas.

Thanks again.....

 

By the way Great Photo of Ms. Scott

 

vallo

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Great photo Mongo:

 

As usual Lancaster looks like he's drugged or high, Scott looks like a statue chiseled in stone, and Douglas has his usual blank stare except when he's trying to be theatrical.

 

Anne

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In the Spotlight: Richard Conte

 

 

Richard Conte (March 24, 1910 ? April 15, 1975) was a dark-haired rugged, virile actor who appeared in numerous films-noir.

 

He was born Nicholas Conte of Italian ancestry in Jersey City, New Jersey, the son of a barber.

 

In 1935, Conte was spotted by Elia Kazan and John Garfield when he was working as an entertainer at a Connecticut resort, which led to Conte finding stage work.

Conte eventually earned a scholarship to study at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York, where he became a standout actor. The 5' 8" Conte became a Broadway actor in the late 1930s, starring in such plays as "Night Music" and "Walk Into My Parlor". That led to his first film performance in 1939, "Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence".

 

In 1942 he signed a long-term contract with 20th Century Fox. He then changed his stage name to Richard (hence his lack of films on TCM). His first film at Fox was "Guadalcanal Diary" (1943). During the World War II years, Conte played mostly soldiers in war dramas, including "A Walk in the Sun" (1945).

 

Conte appeared in many films noir after World War II, in such Fox crime dramas as "Cry of the City" and "Call Northside 777" (both from 1948), and "Thieves' Highway" (1949).

 

In the early 1950s, Conte, now not working for Fox, began appearing in films for various studios. Critics and fans consider his best films from that era to be the film noir B-movies "The Sleeping City" (1950), "Highway Dragnet" (1954) and "The Blue Gardenia" (1953).

Other films include, "The Purple Heart", "A Bell for Adano", "Somewhere in the Night", "The Other Love" w/Stanwyck, "House of Strangers", "Whirlpool", "The Fighter", "New York Confidential", "I'll Cry Tomorrow", "Full of Life" w/Judy Holliday, "The Brothers Rico", etc.

 

Once film noir became less popular in the 1960s Conte?s career was at a standstill. He appeared as Lt. Dave Santini in two Frank Sinatra crime films, "Tony Rome" (1967) and "Lady in Cement" (1968) (He had also appeared with Sinatra in 1960's "Oceans Eleven"). He eventually moved to Europe and acted in a number of films. Later in life, Conte acted one of his most memorable performances in "The Godfather" (1972) as Don Barzini (he was at one time also considered for title role, a role that Marlon Brando eventually filled.) He continued to work in European films, and dabbled in TV, until a heart attack in 1975 at the age of 65.

 

Married twice, he is the father of film actor Mark Conte.

 

The actor does not have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

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The more I see of his work the more I really like this guy! He was absolutely fabulous in HOUSE OF STRANGERS (I thought he and Susan Hayward were hot together), and his character in SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT really had me fooled. Thanks for the background on him and the great pix!

 

Miss G

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