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DownGoesFrazier

The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

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I think that was from the half hour show. Yes, that was a good one.

No, it was from the hour long one. It would have made a nice

half hour show, but there was some added exposition which,

in this case, didn't hurt the story. And still a good one.

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No, it was from the hour long one. It would have made a nice

half hour show, but there was some added exposition which,

in this case, didn't hurt the story. And still a good one.

 

 

Well, whatever the length, it was a good one. I could've sworn it was from the half hour show. I may be mixing it up with another one with Emhardt. He was in a good number of AH's shows.

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Ooooooh...don't let the TCM programmers hear you say THAT, Janet!

 

Word is once this SUTS thing is over this month, those people are just ITCHIN' to present North by Northwest to us again!

 

(...and you certainly wouldn't want to disappoint those folks by having them think you'd purposely skip THAT, now would ya?!)

 

;)

How much was Hitchcock himself generally involved in the selection of material, scripts, casting, and production?

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Well, whatever the length, it was a good one. I could've sworn it was from the half hour show. I may be mixing it up with another one with Emhardt. He was in a good number of AH's shows.

Yes, Emhardt was always good. I recall one, I think it was called "Road Hog,"

where he wouldn't let someone pass his car who had to get to the hospital

ASAP. Of course in the end he got a taste of his own medicine. I remember

another one where he followed a couple who had helped him out on the

road to their hotel room and was listening at the wall and doing all kinds of

weird things. I think he was really the good guy, but he was still creepy.

 

One of my favorite half hour shows was the one where the couple were

pulled over by a cop and given all kinds of trouble in a speed trap town.

At the end, the audience finds out that they are government investigators

and the woman has a tape recorder in her purse and got all the sleazy

acts down on tape. Sweet.

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Yes, Emhardt was always good. I recall one, I think it was called "Road Hog,"

where he wouldn't let someone pass his car who had to get to the hospital

ASAP. Of course in the end he got a taste of his own medicine. I remember

another one where he followed a couple who had helped him out on the

road to their hotel room and was listening at the wall and doing all kinds of

weird things. I think he was really the good guy, but he was still creepy.

 

One of my favorite half hour shows was the one where the couple were

pulled over by a cop and given all kinds of trouble in a speed trap town.

At the end, the audience finds out that they are government investigators

and the woman has a tape recorder in her purse and got all the sleazy

acts down on tape. Sweet.

 

Yes, I remember both of those plots/shows.  I think in that one he actually played the good guy (though he was assumed to be bad until the end). Emhardt I mean.

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This may have been mentioned already, but to say that "Specialty of the House" was a fave of my mother. She was not macabre or morbid in any way, she just appreciated this one. She could see the humor. If I recall correctly the story was treated in a relatively light-hearted way considering the subject though I will stand corrected.

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How much was Hitchcock himself generally involved in the selection of material, scripts, casting, and production?

 

This was the responsibility of producers Joan Harrison and Norman Lloyd. When AH had a window between features he would read summaries of scripts to be filmed and direct the one that appealed to him.

 

AH probably was able to cast some stars for his episodes. I just recently watched the classic AHP "Arthur" w/ Laurence Harvey. LH was then in talks to do No Bail For The Judge w/ Audrey Hepburn for AH (never filmed) and probably did "Arthur" as a favor to AH.

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This was the responsibility of producers Joan Harrison and Norman Lloyd. When AH had a window between features he would read summaries of scripts to be filmed and direct the one that appealed to him.

 

AH probably was able to cast some stars for his episodes. I just recently watched the classic AHP "Arthur" w/ Laurence Harvey. LH was then in talks to do No Bail For The Judge w/ Audrey Hepburn for AH (never filmed) and probably did "Arthur" as a favor to AH.

He liked to cast his daughter and upon occasion mentioned she was his daughter.

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One of my favorite half hour shows was the one where the couple were

pulled over by a cop and given all kinds of trouble in a speed trap town.

At the end, the audience finds out that they are government investigators

and the woman has a tape recorder in her purse and got all the sleazy

acts down on tape. Sweet.

Watched that one last month.  I think Walter Mathau was the Good Ol' Boy cop - if you can picture it.

Somewhat interesting in the number of episodes set in Europe, particularly England.  Also, many are set in the past - early 1900's.

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Watched that one last month.  I think Walter Mathau was the Good Ol' Boy cop - if you can picture it.

Somewhat interesting in the number of episodes set in Europe, particularly England.  Also, many are set in the past - early 1900's.

 

Yes, it WAS Walter Matthau. He starred in several of the half hour shows. I remember Gena Rowlands being in one also and Inger Stevens.....

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Yes, it WAS Walter Matthau. He starred in several of the half hour shows. I remember Gena Rowlands being in one also and Inger Stevens.....

Amazing how many TV shows Inger Stevens was in.

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My favorite TAHH episodes-I can't remember the titles

 

The one with James Caan as a writer investigating juvenile gangs by joining one. 

Diana Hyland as an heiress afraid of being taken in by suitors who tragically is; he's played by Jeremy Slate.

One with Patricia Barry and Robert Culp as movie stars who try to hide the body of her nasty ex, whom she accidentally killed, on the night she wins the Oscar. 

 

For the half-hour shows:

 

The Foghorn- Barbara bel Geddes and Michael Rennie in a tragic story of illicit love with an ending you don't see coming. 

Day of the Bullet-Two boys in NYC come face to face with the mob, police corruption and the inability of one's parent to do the right thing-thirty years later the chickens come home to roost.  Barry Gordon gave me nightmares as "Iggy"

Sybilla-Barbara Bel Geddes and Alexander Scourby. This one was mentioned as a favorite  of many on another thread.  Does she or does she not know she's the intended victim of her husband's murder plot?  

Lamb to the Slaughter-Barbara Bel Geddes in her most famous episode; perhaps the series' as well.  I would but describing the plot would be a spoiler.

 

Yes, there life for BBG before Dallas.  She was in Vertigo as well as the series.  She often lost the male lead to a more glamorous leading actress but was so sweet and honorable I always wanted to see her win out.  With Dallas she got to do that and show and show her "steel magnolia" side; the Ewing men were all scared to death of crossing "Miss Ellie".

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Amazing how many TV shows Inger Stevens was in.

 

 

Her Twilight Zone episode is one of my favorites from that series...

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Inger was in two Twilight Zones.  I assume the favorite is The Hitchhiker, but the lesser remembered The Lateness of the Hour is one I like a lot.

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Claude Rains was in a good number of the half hour AH episodes. (Excellent in all).

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Inger was in two Twilight Zones.  I assume the favorite is The Hitchhiker, but the lesser remembered The Lateness of the Hour is one I like a lot.

 

Yes, The Hitchhiker. I dont remember the other one, but I've probably seen it.

 

Oh, I think I remember it now. Was that the one set in a mansion where she was arguing with her family? (I dont want to give the plot away).

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Yes, The Hitchhiker. I dont remember the other one, but I've probably seen it.

 

Oh, I think I remember it now. Was that the one set in a mansion where she was arguing with her family? (I dont want to give the plot away).

 

It's the one with the family having robot servants, and Stevens resents having them around, and wants to move out and start a family, etc. Then there's the TZ twist.

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It's the one with the family having robot servants, and Stevens resents having them around, and wants to move out and start a family, etc. Then there's the TZ twist.

 

Yes, that was the one I was referring to.

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It's the one where a young woman lives with her parents, the father is an inventor, Inger becomes restless living in the house with a lot of servants and then,..... well...... something has to be done.

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It's the one where a young woman lives with her parents, the father is an inventor, Inger becomes restless living in the house with a lot of servants and then,..... well...... something has to be done.

 

Yes.

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Inger was in two Twilight Zones.  I assume the favorite is The Hitchhiker

 

From Lucille Fletcher's story, first done on radio by Orson Welles

 

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Claude Rains was in a good number of the half hour AH episodes. (Excellent in all).

Fairly good number of "older" actors appeared in AH.

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Watched that one last month.  I think Walter Mathau was the Good Ol' Boy cop - if you can picture it.

Somewhat interesting in the number of episodes set in Europe, particularly England.  Also, many are set in the past - early 1900's.

Yes, it was Matthau, learning his craft as the old expression goes.

And he was very believable in that part. Maybe that would have

been a bit different if he already had a much different screen

persona. I suppose that were a lot of English actors working in

Hollywood, so why not let them keep their accents and have the

episode set in merry olde England.

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Yes, it was Matthau, learning his craft as the old expression goes.

And he was very believable in that part. Maybe that would have

been a bit different if he already had a much different screen

persona. I suppose that were a lot of English actors working in

Hollywood, so why not let them keep their accents and have the

episode set in merry olde England.

This show's collection of past and future stars in its casts dwarfs "The Twilight Zone".

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