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The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

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Another Hitchcock regular was John Williams, English to the bone.

He also appeared in a few of Sir Alfred's films I believe. He was in

the three part episode playing a police inspector, which to me seemed

to go on too long. A better one was where he played a henpecked

husband who got rid of the Mrs. and moved to sunny California to

live life without the ball and chain around. Of course he was found

out. I believe he also appeared in one with Peter Lawford. He hired

Lawford to drive him across the country and there was a question

of multiple mixed up identities. That was one of the better half hour

episodes. He was likely in others that I can't recall right now.

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Another Hitchcock regular was John Williams, English to the bone.

He also appeared in a few of Sir Alfred's films I believe. He was in

the three part episode playing a police inspector, which to me seemed

to go on too long. A better one was where he played a henpecked

husband who got rid of the Mrs. and moved to sunny California to

live life without the ball and chain around. Of course he was found

out. I believe he also appeared in one with Peter Lawford. He hired

Lawford to drive him across the country and there was a question

of multiple mixed up identities. That was one of the better half hour

episodes. He was likely in others that I can't recall right now.

Williams played the insurance investigator in To Catch a Thief.

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Watched that one last month.  I think Walter Mathau was the Good Ol' Boy cop - if you can picture it.

Somewhat interesting in the number of episodes set in Europe, particularly England.  Also, many are set in the past - early 1900's.

 

 

Yes, there were a good number of the half hour shows set in the past or England. That was dropped once the hour long show started for some reason.

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Another Hitchcock regular was John Williams, English to the bone.

He also appeared in a few of Sir Alfred's films I believe. He was in

the three part episode playing a police inspector, which to me seemed

to go on too long. A better one was where he played a henpecked

husband who got rid of the Mrs. and moved to sunny California to

live life without the ball and chain around. Of course he was found

out. I believe he also appeared in one with Peter Lawford. He hired

Lawford to drive him across the country and there was a question

of multiple mixed up identities. That was one of the better half hour

episodes. He was likely in others that I can't recall right now.

 

 

Yes, Williams was in a LOT of the half hour shows.........

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This show's collection of past and future stars in its casts dwarfs "The Twilight Zone".

The Alfred Hitchcock shows did have the advantage of being on

for twice as many seasons as TZ and also more episodes per

season for a period.

 

I remember that a few of the TZ episodes were filmed on a different

type of medium that made them look a bit cheap. The one where Inger

Stevens turns out to be a robot was one of them.

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Williams played the insurance investigator in To Catch a Thief.

Yes. He also played an inspector in Dial M for Murder.

He was definitely typecast as the very English, rather

officious type though with a sense of humor.

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Yes, Williams was in a LOT of the half hour shows.........

I cheated and looked at his IMDb entry. He was in ten episodes

of AHP, but not in any of the hour long ones. I recognize most

of them by the titles. I recall the one where he played a mystery

writer who was murdered and he was able to come back and

try to find out who the killer was.

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Yes. He also played an inspector in Dial M for Murder.

He was definitely typecast as the very English, rather

officious type though with a sense of humor.

But in THE SOLID GOLD CADILLAC, he played a top exec of a very American corporation. Didn't seem to make sense.

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I cheated and looked at his IMDb entry. He was in ten episodes

of AHP, but not in any of the hour long ones. I recognize most

of them by the titles. I recall the one where he played a mystery

writer who was murdered and he was able to come back and

try to find out who the killer was.

 

Yes, I remember that one. I dont remember him in any of the hour ones, so that seems right.

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The Alfred Hitchcock shows did have the advantage of being on

for twice as many seasons as TZ and also more episodes per

season for a period.

 

I remember that a few of the TZ episodes were filmed on a different

type of medium that made them look a bit cheap. The one where Inger

Stevens turns out to be a robot was one of them.

 

 

Yes, I remember the tape looked funny on the Inger one. Like the kind they used on the old tv soaps filmed during that time. (videotape)

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I remember that a few of the TZ episodes were filmed on a different

 

type of medium that made them look a bit cheap. The one where Inger

Stevens turns out to be a robot was one of them.

 

"The Lateness of the Hour", and (IIRC) five other first-season TZ episodes were shot on videotape to save money. While it may look cheap, seeing a 1959 TV production on black and white videotape does give it an immediacy missing in the filmed episodes.

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The Alfred Hitchcock shows did have the advantage of being on

for twice as many seasons as TZ and also more episodes per

season for a period.

 

I remember that a few of the TZ episodes were filmed on a different

type of medium that made them look a bit cheap. The one where Inger

Stevens turns out to be a robot was one of them.

Hitchcock himself was certainly more entertaining than Serling.

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But in THE SOLID GOLD CADILLAC, he played a top exec of a very American corporation. Didn't seem to make sense.

Maybe he was trying to stretch his acting muscles.

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"The Lateness of the Hour", and (IIRC) five other first-season TZ episodes were shot on videotape to save money. While it may look cheap, seeing a 1959 TV production on black and white videotape does give it an immediacy missing in the filmed episodes.

They do look rather stark in comparison with the ones on film.

I recall that the episode where Billy Mumy talks to his dead

grandmother on a toy telephone was another one.

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Hitchcock himself was certainly more entertaining than Serling.

I wonder if Serling also wrote the intros and outros. I know

Hitch had his written for him. Rod is certainly more serious

and dour than Hitch, and Hitch didn't mess around with any

of the ultra serious Cold War stuff like Serling did.

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I wonder if Serling also wrote the intros and outros. I know

Hitch had his written for him. Rod is certainly more serious

and dour than Hitch, and Hitch didn't mess around with any

of the ultra serious Cold War stuff like Serling did.

..although being murdered is ultra-serious to the murderee.

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I wonder if Serling also wrote the intros and outros.

 

I ought to know this, but I don't. I do know that the Control Voice wraparounds in The Outer Limits were usually the work of the scriptwriter -- of course Harlan Ellison b*tched about his being misread.

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..although being murdered is ultra-serious to the murderee.

Yes, but not as serious as a nuclear war with only a

handful of survivors, or maybe only two. That's a

real *****.

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I ought to know this, but I don't. I do know that the Control Voice wraparounds in The Outer Limits were usually the work of the scriptwriter -- of course Harlan Ellison b*tched about his being misread.

I suppose if he wrote so many of the episodes, the short

wraparounds would have been easy, but I don't know for

sure.

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"The Lateness of the Hour", and (IIRC) five other first-season TZ episodes were shot on videotape to save money. While it may look cheap, seeing a 1959 TV production on black and white videotape does give it an immediacy missing in the filmed episodes.

 

I think I recall reading in Stephen King's book "Danse Macabre" that Serling was trying videotape as an "experiment" of some kind for artistic reasons.  Feeling possibly it would give a realistic flavor to the episodes.  Most people I know just think they look "cheap".

 

Back to Hitch---along with the stories many liked that the show put on, another facet was his little comic repasts that he'd end each show with.   And his poking fun of his sponsors and the taking of commercial breaks along with his ability to seemingly have fun with poking fun of himself.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I think I recall reading in Stephen King's book "Danse Macabre" that Serling was trying videotape as an "experiment" of some kind for artistic reasons.  Feeling possibly it would give a realistic flavor to the episodes.  Most people I know just think they look "cheap".

 

Back to Hitch---along with the stories many liked that the show put on, another facet was his little comic repasts that he'd end each show with.   And his poking fun of his sponsors and the taking of commercial breaks along with his ability to seemingly have fun with poking fun of himself.

 

 

Sepiatone

I wonder whether the sponsors found this funny.

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I think I recall reading in Stephen King's book "Danse Macabre" that Serling was trying videotape as an "experiment" of some kind for artistic reasons.  Feeling possibly it would give a realistic flavor to the episodes.  Most people I know just think they look "cheap".

 

It does work very well for the one episode - "Twenty Two".

 

Adds to the eeriness.

 

The other five, not as successful an effect.

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Yes, Emhardt was always good. I recall one, I think it was called "Road Hog,"

where he wouldn't let someone pass his car who had to get to the hospital

ASAP. Of course in the end he got a taste of his own medicine. I remember

another one where he followed a couple who had helped him out on the

road to their hotel room and was listening at the wall and doing all kinds of

weird things. I think he was really the good guy, but he was still creepy.

 

One of my favorite half hour shows was the one where the couple were

pulled over by a cop and given all kinds of trouble in a speed trap town.

At the end, the audience finds out that they are government investigators

and the woman has a tape recorder in her purse and got all the sleazy

acts down on tape. Sweet.

 

 

AntennaTV showed Road Hog this past wknd. I recorded it and watched it yesterday. OUCH! A fitting end. Raymond Massey and Richard Chamberlain were also in it.........

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It does work very well for the one episode - "Twenty Two".

 

Adds to the eeriness.

 

The other five, not as successful an effect.

 

nurse.jpg

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