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DownGoesFrazier

The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

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LOL. But he was in some good stuff too like The Blue Dahlia. I cant recall seeing her in anything, even supporting parts.

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LOL. But he was in some good stuff too like The Blue Dahlia. I cant recall seeing her in anything, even supporting parts.

I just did a quick check of IMDb. He did have more credits than she did,

but she also was pretty busy, though in small, often uncredited roles.

I had forgotten all about Airplane!, where she played the "jive talking

lady." The line I remember is Peter Graves' Joey, do you like movies

with gladiators? They both worked as guest stars on TV shows after

Beaver was over. Must have been a little strange to go from being the

star of the show back to just a guest star. That's show biz.

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I just did a quick check of IMDb. He did have more credits than she did,

but she also was pretty busy, though in small, often uncredited roles.

I had forgotten all about Airplane!, where she played the "jive talking

lady." The line I remember is Peter Graves' Joey, do you like movies

with gladiators? They both worked as guest stars on TV shows after

Beaver was over. Must have been a little strange to go from being the

star of the show back to just a guest star. That's show biz.

 

Yes, I remember her in Airplane, I'd forgotten. But nothing pre-Beav-r. Maybe I just didnt recognize her back then.

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Yes, I remember her in Airplane, I'd forgotten. But nothing pre-Beav-r. Maybe I just didnt recognize her back then.

A lot of the pre-Beaver roles were pretty small, so you have to

look pretty carefully. I remember the one movie where she had

a fairly significant supporting role. I recognized her as much

for her voice as for her looks.

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I remember seeing her in some small supporting roles on TCM, though

I don't remember which movies. It's tough to out star someone who had

been in The Mole People. Maybe she did have a good agent or maybe

Hugh was such a gentleman he gave her top billing.

 

The reason for the billing is that in this case father didn't know best.

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The reason for the billing is that in this case father didn't know best.

Maybe HB was just a nice guy or maybe there was some

convoluted, only in Hollywood explanation for why BB got

first billing.

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A lot of the pre-Beaver roles were pretty small, so you have to

look pretty carefully. I remember the one movie where she had

a fairly significant supporting role. I recognized her as much

for her voice as for her looks.

 

 

Do you remember what the title was? Or if it's something that pops up on TCM? I would think I'd recognize her voice too, so maybe I havent seen it.

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The reason for the billing is that in this case father didn't know best.

She was The original June Cleaver that was cast. In the pilot, Ward was played by Max Showalter (Casey Adams)), and Beaumont replaced him. It is understandable that Billingsley would get top billing.

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She was The original June Cleaver that was cast. In the pilot, Ward was played by Max Showalter (Casey Adams)), and Beaumont replaced him. It is understandable that Billingsley would get top billing.

I think it was just politeness on the part of Connelly and Mosher towards a lady. They were that kind of men who would put Barbara first.

 

Also didn't notice if anyone had mentioned this but a lot of the credit for the unique qualities of the Hitchcock tv series goes to the writer he chose to script all the intros and exit lines for the show, not that the show wasn't totally a Hitchcockian creation with all elements in writers and producers being illustrious. Jimmy Allardice had written for the George Gobel show and also had a success with his Broadway play, At War with the Army. Our family friend, Dan Tobin knew him and as their macabre and offbeat senses of humor were aligned got on well. Both being from Ohio though at opposite ends of the state they shared a certain quirky midwestern take on things as Dan used to say which was reflected in the very witty intros Jimmy wrote for the show. Most people think of Hitch's asides and remarks as being totally Hitchcockian and he was most definitely droll, but all the lead-ins were written by Jimmy and he said Hitch loved when they were totally non-sequitur related to the episodes. He even often wrote supposedly off the cuff remarks for Hitch when he would make appearances. Hitch knew a good thing when he saw it and it saved him from having to come up with witty comments. Dan worked with Jimmy on later shows like The Munsters and his wife Jean, being a scriptwriter who had worked on some of the Ann Sothern shows like Jimmy. Jimmy was later involved with Hogan's Heroes and a lot of other shows each showing his unique take on life. When he died in the mid-1960's I think it hit Hitch hard and he never wanted to work with anyone but Allardice so the show, by then in the hourly segments, ended.

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I thought the show ended due to low ratings? I wasnt aware who wrote Hitch's wraparounds, but they were priceless. Sometimes better than the show itself.

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I think it was just politeness on the part of Connelly and Mosher towards a lady. They were that kind of men who would put Barbara first.

 

Also didn't notice if anyone had mentioned this but a lot of the credit for the unique qualities of the Hitchcock tv series goes to the writer he chose to script all the intros and exit lines for the show, not that the show wasn't totally a Hitchcockian creation with all elements in writers and producers being illustrious. Jimmy Allardice had written for the George Gobel show and also had a success with his Broadway play, At War with the Army. Our family friend, Dan Tobin knew him and as their macabre and offbeat senses of humor were aligned got on well. Both being from Ohio though at opposite ends of the state they shared a certain quirky midwestern take on things as Dan used to say which was reflected in the very witty intros Jimmy wrote for the show. Most people think of Hitch's asides and remarks as being totally Hitchcockian and he was most definitely droll, but all the lead-ins were written by Jimmy and he said Hitch loved when they were totally non-sequitur related to the episodes. He even often wrote supposedly off the cuff remarks for Hitch when he would make appearances. Hitch knew a good thing when he saw it and it saved him from having to come up with witty comments. Dan worked with Jimmy on later shows like The Munsters and his wife Jean, being a scriptwriter who had worked on some of the Ann Sothern shows like Jimmy. Jimmy was later involved with Hogan's Heroes and a lot of other shows each showing his unique take on life. When he died in the mid-1960's I think it hit Hitch hard and he never wanted to work with anyone but Allardice so the show, by then in the hourly segments, ended.

 

 

You knew Dan Tobin? Did he ever talk about working with Welles on The Fountain of Youth?

 

Allardice died in early '66, the AHH went off the air in '65. From what I've read he wrote every word of the wraparounds.

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You knew Dan Tobin? Did he ever talk about working with Welles on The Fountain of Youth?

 

Allardice died in early '66, the AHH went off the air in '65. From what I've read he wrote every word of the wraparounds.

Yes, knew Dan Tobin well. He had been a commercial artist in Ohio before he decided to take off for Hollywood and he worked for a relative of mine at their greeting card business. I remember him commenting on how Welles would take off and no one could ever find him if he wanted to be left alone. Dan was disappointed when things did not work out for that project, but took it in stride since he worked continually over the years playing in so many series and movies. He was quite a character and also stayed friends with another commercial artist in Ohio that we knew who would visit him at our home in California when work took him there. Since Dan had worked with many luminaries from Katharine Hepburn to Cary Grant and so on, he pretty much knew a wide spectrum of film folk. He was as funny offscreen as he was onscreen and was like the grown-up Eddie Haskell in our eyes.

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Do you remember what the title was? Or if it's something that pops up on TCM? I would think I'd recognize her voice too, so maybe I havent seen it.

I'll have to take some time to check her filmography and try to

figure out which movie it was. I don't recall offhand and it was

a number of years ago.

 

I just saw Dan Tobin on Gunsmoke today, playing his usual oily

conman.

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I'll have to take some time to check her filmography and try to

figure out which movie it was. I don't recall offhand and it was

a number of years ago.

 

I just saw Dan Tobin on Gunsmoke today, playing his usual oily

conman.

 

OK. Whenever. Not a pressing issue. Not sure who Dan Tobin is. I'd probably recognize his face......

 

 

I scanned through her filmography and most of her movie roles say uncredited.  Must've been as an extra or walk on. A few titles I recognized. Blink and you'd probably miss her.

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OK. Whenever. Not a pressing issue. Not sure who Dan Tobin is. I'd probably recognize his face......

 

 

I scanned through her filmography and most of her movie roles say uncredited.  Must've been as an extra or walk on. A few titles I recognized. Blink and you'd probably miss her.

He was one of those character actors whose name isn't known but is

recognized when one sees him. He often played a rather charming,

well-spoken conman, but still a conman. He did a lot of TV starting

in the 1950s.

 

She had a relatively good supporting role in the one movie I was

thinking of, though she wasn't on screen that long. I'll have to do

a little checking.

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I remember seeing these shows as a kid and the ones I remember most have been mentioned. They scared the heck out of me back then and even now , as an adult, I remember them as some of the most unforgettable TV from my childhood. "The Jar", "The Unlocked Window" and "The Glass Eye" can still keep me glued to the screen. 

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After making the first 5 seasons available with DVD boxed sets, there have been no more boxed sets for a few years.

 

Wasn't "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" selling well?

 

Somehow, I can't believe that one.

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He was one of those character actors whose name isn't known but is

recognized when one sees him. He often played a rather charming,

well-spoken conman, but still a conman. He did a lot of TV starting

in the 1950s.

 

She had a relatively good supporting role in the one movie I was

thinking of, though she wasn't on screen that long. I'll have to do

a little checking.

 

 

Poor Dan doesnt even rate a picture on imdb, but I finally found a pic of him Oh, yes, I've seen him in many things. Just didnt know his name!!!

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I remember seeing these shows as a kid and the ones I remember most have been mentioned. They scared the heck out of me back then and even now , as an adult, I remember them as some of the most unforgettable TV from my childhood. "The Jar", "The Unlocked Window" and "The Glass Eye" can still keep me glued to the screen. 

 

Who was in the Glass Eye? Not sure I've seen that one.......

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After making the first 5 seasons available with DVD boxed sets, there have been no more boxed sets for a few years.

 

Wasn't "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" selling well?

 

Somehow, I can't believe that one.

Many of those under 50 probably draw a blank at the name "Alfred Hitchcock".

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I wouldnt go that far....

 

 

The Glass Eye is from the half hour show. (just looked it up).

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Poor Dan doesnt even rate a picture on imdb, but I finally found a pic of him Oh, yes, I've seen him in many things. Just didnt know his name!!!

Wasn't there a series of books about supporting players who people

recognized but whose name they couldn't recall? He was in one

episode of Andy Griffith where he played his usual smooth talking,

debonair conman. Everybody fell for his charm except Andy, who

saw right through him.

 

I don't always recall an episode of an AH show by the title, but usually

a short plot summary will jar my memory.

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Yes, I remember him in film, but tv especially. A.G. as well.........

 

Are you talking about the Whatever Happened to? books?

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