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LawrenceA

Dracula In Pictures

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I think my favorite Dracula will always be Bela Lugosi. :) He is the reason actors use an accent while playing Dracula; in the novel, Dracula speaks perfect English, but Lugosi was Hungarian and had a distinctive accent. The character of Dracula became known as having that accent, and in movies today, the Dracula actors still use it, though many do not know how it started.

 

In the novel at what age did Dracula become a vampire?   I ask because this thread is discussing the age of various actors that played the role.   Well since a vampire is DEAD,  I assume they don't age.  I.e. they look the way they looked at the time they became a vampire until they are "killed".    

 

So for an actor to be an authentic Dracula they should be around the same age as when Dracula became a vampire.

 

(yea, silly question, but hey, the entire concept of vampires are).

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In the novel Dracula, when he is first encountered at his castle, he appears as an old man, with "iron-gray" shoulder length hair and a large mustache. When the action moves to England, and he continues to feed, he looks younger, and his hair and mustache darken.

 

Most Dracula "experts" have said that Christopher Lee in the 1970 Jess Franco-directed version bore the closest resemblance to the way the character was described in the novel.

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In the novel Dracula, when he is first encountered at his castle, he appears as an old man, with "iron-gray" shoulder length hair and a large mustache. When the action moves to England, and he continues to feed, he looks younger, and his hair and mustache darken.

 

Most Dracula "experts" have said that Christopher Lee in the 1970 Jess Franco-directed version bore the closest resemblance to the way the character was described in the novel.

 

Thanks for the info.    I was going to start dying my hair but maybe I'll just feed instead!   :lol:

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A comment (or two) about the photos and what I see--

 

Some of these portrayals are meant to be intensely sexual. That a man's energy to vamp and demonstrate his sex is being represented in an animalistic sort of way. The men (male actors) who play these roles on screen and figuratively in real life bring to them a horned-up sort of pride. 

 

But in all these photos, the one that stands out to me most is Gary Oldman's version. His is the least sexy (on the surface)-- his goes beyond the erotic depravity; his power is not cute or tall-dark-handsome-- but much more dangerous and deadly.

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A comment (or two) about the photos and what I see--

 

Some of these portrayals are meant to be intensely sexual. That a man's energy to vamp and demonstrate his sex is being represented in an animalistic sort of way. The men (male actors) who play these roles on screen and figuratively in real life bring to them a horned-up sort of pride. 

 

But in all these photos, the one that stands out to me most is Gary Oldman's version. His is the least sexy (on the surface)-- his goes beyond the erotic depravity; his power is not cute or tall-dark-handsome-- but much more dangerous and deadly.

 

With the Coppola/Oldman version, the obvious visual inspiration for the younger Dracula was the real-life Vlad Tepes.

 

vlad_tepes_big-x01.jpg

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With the Coppola/Oldman version, the obvious visual inspiration for the younger Dracula was the real-life Vlad Tepes.

 

Coppola probably made the most "accurate" version. I had been part of a test screening the studio did in Westwood before it was released to the rest of the country. Some people left the theater to go vomit. It was excessively violent and bloody. I've never seen the version that went into wide release. Seeing it once was enough for me. LOL 

 

I think they had to edit parts out, due to the responses the test audience gave them. But obviously Coppola was very serious about the details. And Oldman's performance is unmatched. 

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Coppola's Bram Stoker's Dracula is a film that I like, but it has many problems. The costumes, set design, camera work, and purposefully at-times old-fashioned effects work are all very enjoyable. I think Gary Oldman and Wynona Ryder are both great in their roles, but Keanu Reeves is horribly miscast, with some truly laughable moments, and a disappearing accent. Anthony Hopkins also goes way over the top as Van Helsing, which detracts at times in a movie that's already visually over the top.

 

Much was made in the pre-release press about how faithful and accurate this version would be to the novel. And of course it's not. Dracula is not a romantic figure in the book; in fact, he's not much of a character at all. The book is written in the form of character's journal entries. The first section is Jonathan Harker's journal (Keanu Reeves), while the next section is in Mina's journal/POV (Winona Ryder). The last section alternates with Van Helsing's POV also added. Dracula himself is never the POV character, and is really a supporting figure, little more than a menace to be thwarted. The main fidelity to the book that the 1992 film makes is adding all of the suitors of Mina's friend Lucy (Sadie Frost): Lord Arthur Holmwood (Cary Elwes), Dr. Seward (Richard E. Grant) and the American Quincy Morris (Billy Campbell). These characters are either combined or disregarded in most versions.

 

The script by James V. Hart bears a striking resemblance to Fred Saberhagen's 1975 novel The Dracula Tape, a re-telling of the events of Bram Stoker's novel, but told from Dracula's point of view. This story included the sympathetic, highly romanticized Dracula that Oldman would play. Although Saberhagen's much earlier novel is not credited in the film, I think the producers understood the similarities, since they hired Saberhagen to write the film's novelization. That's right, folks: Bram Stoker's Dracula has a novelization, and it's not Bram Stoker's book! 

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LawrenceA--Would you please post a picture of Willem Dafoe as Nosferatu in "Shadow of the Vampire" (2000)?  It's an Excellent Dracula movie, and as far as I know, Dafoe was the only actor to get an Oscar nomination for playing Dracula.  Thanks. :)

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Sure, film lover. I didn't have him in the gallery to begin with because I wasn't sure he was playing Dracula, since the character is credited as "Max Schreck". But it's close enough for me!

 

Willem DaFoe in Shadow of the Vampire (2000)

 

ShadowOfTheVampire_16-720x388.jpg?42e6e4

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James Nalitz (left) as Count Klaus Vogel in The Vulture's Eye (2004) an America-set retelling of Dracula.

 

thevultureseye-6.jpg

 

 

Hal Handerson (right) as Count Alucard in Alucard (2008)

 

alucard_minaandalucard.jpg

 

 

Peter Stormare voices the Count in The Batman vs. Dracula (2005)

 

1819730-1453798_22.jpg

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