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THE ONE MUSICAL YOU'D TAKE WITH YOU IF YOU WERE STRANDED ON AN ISLAND IS...

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**The sound of Music!!!! LOVE THOSE Songs!!!! I simply remember my favourite things and then i don't feeel SOO BAAAAD!!LOL!! also if i could sneak some more i would take the whole Fred/Ginger musicals with me!**

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I could have to take "The Great Caruso"/"Serenade" if i could get them on one disc. I hope we get rescued soon,i can't do without my Mario.

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TCM is finally going to show Juke Box Rhythm again on April 15, 4:45 p.m., to commemorate its 50th anniversary. It's a "B" musical, b&w, and (as in most musicals) its story is thin, but I think it's worthwhile to see for the music. The numbers feature acts from the very early days of rock 'n' roll: Earl Grant Trio, Johnny Otis Band, and the Treniers. Jack Jones also sings one of Bacharach & David's earliest compositions together, "Make Room For the Joy." I ended up buying a DVD copy of Juke Box Rhythm from The Video Beat for $29. Can you believe that it's a copy recorded from an earlier TCM telecast, with the TCM logo appearing mid-film? With the movie now on the TCM schecdule, viewers will have the chance to record it themselves.

 

Edited to clarify the movie title, since I'm replying to a six-month-old message

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Oh, hands down it would HAVE to be "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers". Definitely. If I was going to be stranded with anyone, I would want it to be with those 7 men!!

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I'd take West Side Story and I'll tell you why----I already have my other favorites memorized. The dancing in WSS is so intricate and amazing that if I was on a desert Island maybe I'd have time to learn it all.

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Jerome Robbins was a very talented choreographer, wasn't he? It's almost sad that reportedly he and Robert Wise didn't always get along so well.

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> {quote:title=moviefan1951 wrote:}{quote}

> Jerome Robbins was a very talented choreographer, wasn't he? It's almost sad that reportedly he and Robert Wise didn't always get along so well.

 

Where was that reported? It was Wise who kept him around longer than Walter Mirisch wanted, and insisted he retain his screen credit, after Mirisch fired him. He ultimately did very little on the picture, compared to Wise, and was given an Oscar, because of Wise's interventions.

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I'll check my recording of the Walter Mirisch Private Screenings, I'm not sure if what I remember hearing was in that particular program or somewhere else entirely. And it's also perfectly possible my source on that was not completely accurate, but in either case I'd like to try and make sure I got the facts right.

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yeah, as far as I know the problem wasn't with robert wise, it was that Jerome spent too much time and went over budget so the guys in charge fired him. That's what I got from American masters: Jerome Robbins

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I'd take Pillow Talk with me because to me that was some of Doris Day and Rock Hudson best work together.And I wouldn't ever want to not be able to see it again.

 

Message was edited by: writer66

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I personally don't consider Pillow Talk a musical. I love the movie. I think it is adorable, but looking at other films of the time that were musicals, I feel like Pillow Talk is not one. Just my opinion though.

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I would take Eleanor Powell with me if I were stranded on an island because...wait...hey!!!

 

Just thought I'd post to get away from the "madding" crowd above the line. And because I just saw Ann Miller do her "Shaking the Blues Away" number in "Easter Parade" and she was mesmerizing. Where Eleanor Powell was sleek and could do every step Fred Astaire could do...Miller was like a LasVegas show girl.

 

And that's not a bad thing either.

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orson4ever:

You commented that TCM on April 15th will be running the 1959 movie "Juke Box Rhythm" to commemorate its 50th anniversary. Well yes it's true that the movie is 50 years old this year, but that is not the reason TCM is showing it.

 

The reason is to celebrate the birthday of the great character actor, radio actor, and cartoon voice artist Hans Conried. Every movie that day starting with "Dulcy" (1940) features Hans Conried.

 

More info on Hans Conried:

 

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/participant.jsp?spid=38081

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0175788/

 

So tune in and celebrate the birthday of Hans Conried on the 15th!

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musicalnovelty:

Thanks for posting this about Hans Conried's birthday. See what I get for not being a current subscriber to Now Playing! I couldn't figure out why this usual, latenight feature suddenly got moved to a prime daytime slot (and also got confused by the strange coincidence that Juke Box Rhythm was originally released in APRIL of 1959). But the fine Mr. Conried was certainly worthy of his honor!

 

I noticed that Juke Box Rhythm - originally a Columbia film - is now owned by Sony Pictures, which also owns the rest of Sam Katzman's Columbia catalog (mostly horror films). It appeared that Sony also gave Juke Box Rhythm more of a sepia tone that I remember in past showings. Maybe this means that it'll someday get a proper DVD, although I don't know what Sony would package it with.

 

For me, one of the most interesting things about Juke Box Rhythm is that, in spite of Sam Katzman being notoriously thrifty in this productions, he ended up with so many talented people for this particular film. Brian Donlevy, in the later years of his career by '59, brought so much dignity and dedication to his simple little role, and it's always nice when a B movie surprises you like this.

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It would be nice if Columbia released "Juke Box Rhythm" in a DVD set. There were several "Rock", "Pop", "Twist", and even mambo, etc. movies made by Columbia from the mid-1950's to early 1960's that would make a good DVD set.

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I would take the 1936 "Show Boat", providing it's ever officially released on DVD (hint, hint).

 

On the other hand, a desert island has a lot of sand, and I certainly don't want to get sand all over my DVD's. :)

 

Message was edited by: AlbertCD

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I would choose 'Carousel' with Shirley Jones and Gordon MacRae. The songs, acting and dancing are spectacular. Rodgers and Hammerstein changed the origninal Molinar version to show redemption as Billy comes back to earth to tell his beautiful daughter:

"Walk on, walk on with hope in your heart,

And you'll never walk alone,

You'll never walk alone."

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I would have to take *Gold Diggers of 1933*. It has Dick Powell, my favorite actor, but besides him, it has a lot of other great stars: Ruby Keeler, Joan Blondell, Ned Sparks, Aline MacMahone, Ginger Rogers, Guy Kibbee, etc.

 

And the music! "Torch Song," "In the Shadows," "My Forgotten Man," and my favorite pre-code song "Pettin' in the Park."

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I think, for me, it would definitely be FOR ME AND MY GAL (1942). Lots of reasons. Firstly, I absolutely love Judy-- she was really something else. This film is different from most musicals of the period because the story line is good (don't get bored during the non-musical scenes), movie audiences met Gene Kelly for the first time (although, his role here is very similar to his PAL JOEY role on Broadway). But the one who steals the show is none other than Judy. Her acting ability was wonderful here and if that isn't enough, we have one show-stopping song after another-- Oh, You Beautiful Doll, For Me and My Gal, After You've Gone (what a knockout!), Ballin' the Jack (another knockout), How Ya Gonna Keep 'em Down on the Farm, and lots of others. I watch this gem every time TCM shows it... It just gets better!

 

formeandmygalHALF.jpg

 

Message was edited by: mooveeluvr

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Just about any Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, but if obligated to just one, it would have to be.................The Sound of Music.

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For me, it would have to be West Side Story and South Pacific.

 

West Side Story is a special movie for me, because it's my all time favorite musical and film, hands down, plus I never get tired of seeing it over and over and over again.

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