MovieMadness

Stupid Science

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The Switch to Outdoor LED Lighting Has Completely Backfired

To reduce energy consumption, many jurisdictions around the world are transitioning to outdoor LED lighting. But as new research shows, this solid-state solution hasn’t yielded the expected energy savings, and potentially worse, it’s resulted in more light pollution than ever before.

Using satellite-based sensors, an international team of scientists sought to understand if our planet’s surface is getting brighter or darker at night, and to determine if LEDs are saving energy at the global scale. With the introduction of solid-state lighting—such as LEDs, OLEDs, and PLEDs—it was thought (and hoped) that the transition to it from conventional lighting—like electrical filaments, gas, and plasma—would result in big energy savings. According to the latest research, however, the use of LEDs has resulted in a “rebound” effect whereby many jurisdictions have opted to use even more light owing to the associated energy savings.

Indeed, as the new results show, the amount of outdoor lighting around the world has increased during the past several years. “As a result, the world has experienced widespread ‘loss of the night,’ with half of Europe and a quarter of North America experiencing substantially modified light-dark cycles,” write the researchers in the new study, which was published today in Scientific Advances.

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When are people going to stop listening to these scammer "scientists". They were all wrong about LED lighting, just like they are all wrong about "global warming".

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45 minutes ago, MovieMadness said:

The Switch to Outdoor LED Lighting Has Completely Backfired

To reduce energy consumption, many jurisdictions around the world are transitioning to outdoor LED lighting. But as new research shows, this solid-state solution hasn’t yielded the expected energy savings, and potentially worse, it’s resulted in more light pollution than ever before.

Using satellite-based sensors, an international team of scientists sought to understand if our planet’s surface is getting brighter or darker at night, and to determine if LEDs are saving energy at the global scale. With the introduction of solid-state lighting—such as LEDs, OLEDs, and PLEDs—it was thought (and hoped) that the transition to it from conventional lighting—like electrical filaments, gas, and plasma—would result in big energy savings. According to the latest research, however, the use of LEDs has resulted in a “rebound” effect whereby many jurisdictions have opted to use even more light owing to the associated energy savings.

Indeed, as the new results show, the amount of outdoor lighting around the world has increased during the past several years. “As a result, the world has experienced widespread ‘loss of the night,’ with half of Europe and a quarter of North America experiencing substantially modified light-dark cycles,” write the researchers in the new study, which was published today in Scientific Advances.

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When are people going to stop listening to these scammer "scientists". They were all wrong about LED lighting, just like they are all wrong about "global warming".

My issue some LED lighting are simply too bright, (the while/blue ones).

The advantage is if used properly can replace those awful yellow street lights.

buenos-aires-led-street-lamps-01.jpg.650

 

 

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

My issue some LED lighting are simply too bright, (the while/blue ones).

The advantage is if used properly can replace those awful yellow street lights.

buenos-aires-led-street-lamps-01.jpg.650

 

 

You know, this reminds me of the Energy-Saver/Frost-Free setting on a household refridgerator.  That is controlled by a switch inside that turns on or off a heating element that spans around parts of the perimeter of the door and around the inside.  Most probably wouldn't see the value in having some heat, unless you take into consideration the example of a frost-free setting on a refridgerator. 

Or think about all the outdoor lighting which could get snow packed into it during a blizard.  Say for instance snow gets packed into traffic lights during a blizzard, that has actually happened with newer LED lights.  Then they are not thawing out and the traffic light gets blocked.  So should traffic lights also have a heating element, in addition to the dropping resistor in the base of the LED bulb (which in some cases seems to be an insufficient source of heat to thaw out the snow)?

Then there are some benefits to having less heat, such in small recessed lighting fixtures, small rooms, etc.

I like the color of the ordinary halogen/incandescent lighting in my indoors living areas.  So only in the most unusual lighting fixtures do I have LED lighting.  These include small recessed fixtures above the stove and above the kitchen sink, where traditional bulbs would overheat and prematurely burn out.  I do have fluorescent lighting in my shop area, though I don't bother at all with CCFLs.

The halogen lights around the house almost all have dimmer switches (either on the lamps or on the walls) which I use to knock off the top 5%  to 10%.  This can be used to get a nice pleasant orangish-redish glow which is not really possible with other technologies.  Also dimming any incandescent bulb by just a small amount will increase the life of the bulb dramatically.  A good analogy to that is that hard service incandescent bulbs, such as those used in conventional traffic lights, are actually 130 volt bulbs.  Since they operate on 120 volts, they never reach their rated power.  That helps them to last much longer.

Also there is a new technology being developed by scientists right now, outside of LED, fluourescent, and incandescent (tungsten and halogen) which I have read about.  It is a reimagination of the incandescent bulb:
Return of incandescent light bulbs as MIT makes them more efficient than LEDs
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/03/12/return-of-incandescent-light-bulbs-as-mit-makes-them-more-effici/
These will have the aesthetics of a conventional incandescent (tungsten or halogen) bulb.  If they can make this work, and at an affordable price to the consumer, then I think this is the way to go.

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