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bobhopefan1940

[i]The Pirate[/i] (1948)

110 posts in this topic

Any oppinions on this one? I held off watching until last night... I had seen clips of it and assumed I didn't like the way Kelly looked in it.

 

Well, you know what happens when you assume! I loved it, Garland and Kelly were dynamite. I'm glad I recorded it now...

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Put me on the side of "loving it' too. I love the Nicholas Brothers, so it was gratifying to finally see them in an MGM musical and appalling that it the number was cut in some southern markets. These dapper geniuses of dance were so underused. I'm grateful that we have them on record in Orchestra Wives and the other few Twentieth Century Fox musicals in which they appeared.

 

I love Minnelli's color palette.

 

I'm always fascinated by "Be a Clown" and how Arthur Freed so boldly stole the number for "Make 'em Laugh" in Singin' in the Rain. Didn't anyone say anything at the time? "Uh, Mr. Freed, you can't do that..." Why didn't Cole Porter sue?

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Thanks for the reply, at least I know I'm not alone! I heard it was a big flop upon its original release... I showed it to a friend the other night and she loved it, too.

 

Gene Kelly could have used a hair cut, though... ;) I wish I could see the original "Voodoo" dance routine. What a shame we'll never see it.

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"The Pirate" is one of my all-time favorites. Designed and performed beautifully. Very much ahead of its time. Glad you liked it!!

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I like it quite a lot. I can understand why it failed to find an audience at the time, because it is a little too heavily stylized in some respects, but, despite her rather jittery onscreen demeanor, Judy gets some marvelously witty lines and situations (e.g., in response to another girl's offer to "sacrifice herself" to the pirate, Macoco: "He asked for ME!") all of which she delivers stylishly and with relish.

 

And, though the film was produced primarily to enable to Judy to broaden her range into more sophisticated roles (its' failure apparently caused MGM to issue a policy of retrenchment where her image was concerned, beginning with EASTER PARADE), I generally think the film belongs to Gene Kelly, who has some terrific moments as the hammy actor posing as Judy's pirate hero. (e.g., to Judy: "You know, it isn't essential for you to love me to be in my troupe....It helps, but it's not essential.")

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I've always liked this one, and I'm a little surprised when I find people who don't like it.

 

I really like Kelly's dancing in this film. I think this catches him at the peak of his athletic ability. the "Be A Clown" number with the Nicholas Brothers is simply terrific.

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I love this musical too, and can't wait for a DVD release!

 

BTW, here's what the book "The MGM Story" says about The Pirate:

A bit too fancy for the masses, the film did well in city centers and developed an enduring cult following.

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Thanks for the quote, cinemascope!

 

So happy to see alot of people voicing their love for this musical. Does anyone know exactly why "VooDoo" was cut from the release? I hear it was supposedly too provacative, but was that due to the song or dance or what? Didn't they know before they filmed the scene it was going to be that way so why was it such a shock? Any info would be great.

 

Thanks

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What happened to the original voodoo scene?

... ofcourse it ended up on the cutting room floor.... but.... was it tossed or is it locked up in a vault somewhere that may perhaps come out when they put the moive on DVD... hopefully.

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I believe the footage was lost in the MGM archive fire that happen over 40 years ago. The soundtrack was kept in a separate site, so the song recording still exists but the film doesn't...

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Rhino Records -- in partnership with TCM -- released a limited numbered edition of 2,500 cds of The Pirate under their "Handmade" division. This disk includes the "Voodoo" outtake, along with outtakes of "Love Of My Life", an unused version of "Mack the Knife", demos of several numbers and interviews with Judy Garland and Gene Kelly. It might still be available at the Rhino Handmade website...

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> Rhino Records -- in partnership with TCM -- released

> a limited numbered edition of 2,500 cds of The

> Pirate under their "Handmade" division. This

> disk includes the "Voodoo" outtake, along with

> outtakes of "Love Of My Life", an unused version of

> "Mack the Knife", demos of several numbers and

> interviews with Judy Garland and Gene

> Kelly. It might still be available at the Rhino

> Handmade website...

 

 

I must have missed out on that, I hope some are still available B-)

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Oh yeah, I guess I should post it in this thread, too:

The Pirate won't be showing again until the 19th, but it's worth looking forward to! :)

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I believe Grobanite is referring to the "Be A Clown" number in The Pirate, compared to the eerily similar "Make 'Em Laugh" number in Singin' In The Rain.

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"Make Em Laugh" was written by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown especially for Donald O'Connor. It's generally agreed that they stole the melody almost exactly from Cole Porter's "Be a Clown". Irving Berlin was visiting the set one day when he heard a playback of "Make 'Em Laugh". When Berlin asked whose song that was, Freed quickly changed the subject.

 

--IMDb

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Even though they are basically the exact same song, I much prefer the number in SITR, compared to the one in THE PIRATE. But yes, it's a direct steal.

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> That's probably not exactly what Porter was thinking,

> but I'm sure it was somewhere along those lines ;)

 

I would certainly think so! B-)

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