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Dialogfan

Favorite Rapid Fire Insult Movies

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What are your favorite comedic insult movies?  

 

I am particularly interested in those with clever, snarky and intelligent insults.  

 

 

1939's Pride and Prejudice 

 

His Gal Friday 

 

 

others?  

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THE PHILADELPHIA STORY has quite a few.

 

(...ah, but then again, a movie that takes place in a town where they once booed and insulted Santa Claus during a football game probably would, wouldn't it) ;) 

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And then there's the witty and sharp-tongued repartee to be found in almost any Tracy/Hepburn movie.

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In my opinion, The Women has the best insults but no one could throw an insult like Ginger Rogers in any movie.

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Clive Brook's "On Approval" (1944).

 

Billy Wilder's "One, Two, Three" (1961).

 

"Kind Hearts and Coronets" (1949).

 

"The Women" (1939).

 

"Twentieth Century" (1934).

 

"Duck Soup" (1933).

 

"A Night at the Opera" (1935).

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Great choices!

 

The Women....wow, I should have thought of that and "The Awful Truth."

 

Of course, it is even hard to check the iPhone when "My Gal Friday" is on, lest we miss a single line!  

 

 

I enjoy the Marx Brothers, but the insults are not always intellectual zings...that is what I had in mind and I should have made it more clear:

 

intellectual zings that take a moment to consider just how insulting the line just was!

 

With this in mind, others??

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Stage Door (1937): Well, at least the beginning to middle of this film was more comedic and filled with witty repartee (mostly coming from either Lucille Ball, Eve Arden, or Ginger Rogers, with the occasional quip from Katharine Hepburn)

 

Linda: ...Or maybe it's casserole, I'm not quite certain.

Jean: Be sure not to eat the bones and give yourself away! 

 

Vivacious Lady (1938; also starring Ginger)

Girl: I'm going to give you a piece of my mind.

Ginger: Oh, I'd hate to take the last piece. 

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Just came back to this thread wondering if anybody has yet mentioned that wonderful movie series filled with witty and often shape-tongued exchanges between a married couple who solved crimes.

 

And sure as heck, and unless I've somehow missed it, nobody as of yet has mentioned these two...

 

wink.jpg

 

(...well okay...three including Asta there)

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"I was born a bastard. But you...you're a self-made man..."

--Lee Marvin to Ralph Bellamy, 'The Professionals'

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On 11/15/2016 at 12:01 PM, film lover 293 said:

Billy Wilder's "One, Two, Three" (1961).

"Duck Soup" (1933).

"A Night at the Opera" (1935).

Hard to get past those three, but if I had to pick a more recent one, what about Billy Crystal and Gregory Hines from "Running Scared" (1984)?

I enjoy the Marx Brothers, but the insults are not always intellectual zings...that is what I had in mind and I should have made it more clear:

intellectual zings that take a moment to consider just how insulting the line just was!

So, not like Danny DeVito from "Romancing the Stone" (1984), then?

"Look, I can't talk now, Ira, she's with some guy...How should I know 'which guy', she likes guys--So do you! (hangs up phone)"  

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“Comedic” depends upon one’s point of view, while “clever, snarky and intelligent insults” are trumped by gutsy, raw, vial, “rapid fire” insulting dialog grounded in historical ignorance that hits viewers like a sledgehammer.

How insulting is this “classic” movie?

Well, it took the presents of historian/author Donald Bogle, a late night/early morning airing along with Ben Mankiewicz seemingly perched upon the edge of his pins-n-needles chair to introduce.

With that being said, TCM should be commended for airing this movie UNCENSORED, particularly in an environment of political correctness, me too movements, along with crowds focused upon the destruction/removal of a Nation’s historical flags and statues.

Can you guess the name of this movie? :rolleyes:

No, it's not "The Man Who Came to Dinner" (1942) which may "fit" the criteria being sought. :lol:

 

💋

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One of my favorite ('sorta insults') of all-time comes from backstage at some long-forgotten Hollywood backlot.

Typically as you know--in Golden Age Hollywood--scads of young extras, 'nobodies', chorus girls and 'aspiring starlets' set aside pride and used their womanly charms to wrangle their first on-screen credits. It was simply a done thing. Dire necessity in the Depression Era.

Anyway so there was one film (I don't know what the title was) which roped-in a lot of this ambitious young talent but at some point in the production things were going so badly that one of these babes sassed out:

"Christ, who do I have to *_*_*_*_ to get OFF this picture?!"

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Legendary story; may be apocryphal or not--who knows? but its still hilarious. Sounds like it should have come from Jean Harlowe.

 

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19 minutes ago, Sgt_Markoff said:

Anyway so there was one film (I don't know what the title was) which roped-in a lot of this ambitious young talent but at some point in the production things were going so badly that one of these babes sassed out:

"Christ, who do I have to *_*_*_*_ to get OFF this picture?!"

Or as Benny Hill parodied:
(actress storms off of failed commercial) "Who do I have to sleep with to get OFF this job??"

(Benny follows offstage) "...Er, if you've got a moment, I could tell you? :) "

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