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Neglected Films With Gay Favorites

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"Hemingway's Adventures Of A Young Man" (1962) is such a terrific film that I don't understand the fact that it has no reputation today.

 

It is taken from autobiographical data in Ernest Hemingway's short stories and novels.

 

And it was written by a well-known and intimate friend of Mr. Hemingway's.

 

It is also richly directed by Martin Ritt, who is, in my opinion, anyway, a great film director.

 

And several well-known actors like Paul Newman were quite willing to play "cameos" in the film.

 

It stars Richard Beymer, who, since "West Story Story", has built up quite a gay following.

 

This fact alone should have given the film far more weight today.

 

Mr. Beymer carries this film, this epic film, beautifully.

 

His scenes with Susan Strasberg, who plays the woman whom he loves and loses, are really quite lovely.

 

If this film had been a box-office success, Ms. Strasberg might've had a far more substantial career in the movies.

 

Anyway, if you can, please check this film out.

 

As an early 20th Century film epic, it is a rare achievement.

 

   22901_1_large.jpg 

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I agree, it's a film people should seek out. I've seen it on the FXM Retro channel, and it is also on home video. Don't remember TCM ever airing it, though.

 

Maybe one of the reasons it didn't do too well is that it came after many Hemingway adaptations and in the wake of Fox's overblown (and failed) epic A FAREWELL TO ARMS. By the early 60s, audiences were exhausted and turned off by the subject matter. However, as you say, Ritt's direction and the cameos make it worth watching. I especially like Jessica Tandy's performance.

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I agree, it's a film people should seek out. I've seen it on the FXM Retro channel, and it is also on home video. Don't remember TCM ever airing it, though.

 

Maybe one of the reasons it didn't do too well is that it came after many Hemingway adaptations and in the wake of Fox's overblown (and failed) epic A FAREWELL TO ARMS. By the early 60s, audiences were exhausted and turned off by the subject matter. However, as you say, Ritt's direction and the cameos make it worth watching. I especially like Jessica Tandy's performance.

Yes, all of the cameo performances were quite stunning, especially Paul Newman's.

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The one, the only Tommy Kirk in 1967's "The Catalina Caper" -

 

Okay, okay, I do know that it isn't a good film -

 

but it stars Tommy Kirk, who is mostly parading around in a SWIMSUIT -

 

and it also has Brian Cutler and Michael Blodgett in SWIMSUITS, too -

 

they provide such a heavenly landscape -

 

and I never thought that I'd get to know Tommy Kirk's bod in such intimate detail -

 

lucky me, lucky you -

 

the film also offers the musical delights of The Cascades, Carol Connors and the ineffable Little Richard -

 

according to the credits, somebody did write a screenplay -

 

but the film plays like it is being "improvised" -

 

and, happily for us, the actors do make sense of it -

 

sort of, but, for awhile, it is kind of shaky -

 

but this film does prove that Tommy Kirk could do no wrong even in the most challenging of circumstances -

 

and, of course, that he has to be wearing a SWIMSUIT -

 

that leaves nothing to the imagination -

 

we love you, Tommy -

 

and we always will!!!!

 

PRICELESS IMAGERY (intentional or not):

 

catalina-caper-4.jpg

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"She's Got Everything" with Gene Raymond and Ann Southern -

 

a rich girl loses everything and goes to work -

 

her creditors attempt to motivate a romance with her employer, a very rich man

 

meanwhile, her aunt and one of her creditors meander into the mix -

 

then, the rich man discovers that it was all a plot -

 

but the former rich girl did fall for her employer -

 

in the end, he walks out and she walks out -

 

but, then, they just happen to get married in the back of a truck -

 

a throwaway comedy from RKO that was probably made in a week or two -

 

but everybody is having such a good time -

 

and you will be -

 

and, then, of course, there is Gene Raymond, who is - swoon-worthy!

 

Ann is about to sing "It's Sleepy Time in Hawaii" to Gene -

 

00381343.jpeg

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"She's Got Everything" with Gene Raymond and Ann Southern

 

Great film. They did several other ones together at RKO in the 30s, but this is probably the best one.

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"THE DAY THE FISH CAME OUT" - 1967

 

English actor Tom Courtenay in a film by Greek director, Michael Cacoyannis -

 

this film is such a fiasco that it turns memorable, too -

 

two pilots (Courtenay and Colin Blakely (sp?) crash on a remote Greek island -

 

before doing so, they are ordered to dump their nuclear cargo - a large tube and a large box -

 

subsequently, they wander around WITHOUT CLOTHES wondering what to do -

 

later, gov't agents arrive on the island and they are looking for the nuclear cargo -

 

Courtenay and Blakely are believed "dead" -

 

the gov't agents disguse themselves as very gay tourists who are scouting the island in the hope of building a hotel - 

 

the gov't agents are dressed in a flamboyantly gay manner -

 

a goatherd has found the large box and is trying to penetrate it -

 

meanwhile, the word gets out to the international set that the island is "hot" -

 

these tourists arrive in flamboyantly Felliniesque fashion -

 

so does Candace Bergen as "Electra", who goes after one of the gov't agents, Ian Oglivy (sp?), thus, blowing his gay cover -

 

eventually, things go from bad to worse - the water system is polluted - the fish die in the waters - and the party on the island rages on -

 

this is one of the most "covertly gay films" that has ever been made -

 

but Tom Courtenay, baring all, with close shots of his ****, actually saves the day -

 

his bod is meant to feast eyes on -

 

I defy you to see this film and not love its' very "badness".

 

8100.jpg

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"THE DAY THE FISH CAME OUT" - 1967

 

English actor Tom Courtenay in a film by Greek director, Michael Cacoyannis -

 

this film is such a fiasco that it turns memorable, too -

 

two pilots (Courtenay and Colin Blakely (sp?) crash on a remote Greek island -

 

before doing so, they are ordered to dump their nuclear cargo - a large tube and a large box -

 

subsequently, they wander around WITHOUT CLOTHES wondering what to do -

 

later, gov't agents arrive on the island and they are looking for the nuclear cargo -

 

Courtenay and Blakely are believed "dead" -

 

the gov't agents disguse themselves as very gay tourists who are scouting the island in the hope of building a hotel - 

 

the gov't agents are dressed in a flamboyantly gay manner -

 

a goatherd has found the large box and is trying to penetrate it -

 

meanwhile, the word gets out to the international set that the island is "hot" -

 

these tourists arrive in flamboyantly Felliniesque fashion -

 

so does Candace Bergen as "Electra", who goes after one of the gov't agents, Ian Oglivy (sp?), thus, blowing his gay cover -

 

eventually, things go from bad to worse - the water system is polluted - the fish die in the waters - and the party on the island rages on -

 

this is one of the most "covertly gay films" that has ever been made -

 

but Tom Courtenay, baring all, with close shots of his ****, actually saves the day -

 

his bod is meant to feast eyes on -

 

I defy you to see this film and not love its' very "badness".

 

8100.jpg

This sounds like one of those films that could only have been made in 1960s

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This sounds like one of those films that could only have been made in 1960s

The fact that its' two principal actors - Tom Courtenay and Colin Blakely - are running around throughout the entire film WITHOUT THEIR CLOTHES makes it a unique film in the annals of "supposedly straight" cinema.

 

You could not find a gayer "straight" film.

 

the-day-the-fish-came-out-1967-tcf-film-

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The fact that its' two principal actors - Tom Courtenay and Colin Blakely - are running around throughout the entire film WITHOUT THEIR CLOTHES makes it a unique film in the annals of "supposedly straight" cinema.

 

You could not find a gayer "straight" film.

 

the-day-the-fish-came-out-1967-tcf-film-

There is nothing gayer that European men dancing in spedos  ; )

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"That Girl From Paris" - 1936

 

Lily Pons and Gene Raymond are an unexpectedly delightful duo in this lively romantic romp from RKO.

 

Lily Pons enters the United States illegally - she ran out on her wedding in Paris - and she seeks/gets shelter with Gene Raymond and his band.

 

Lily Pons is a winning screen personality and has an exceedingly ravishing voice.

 

The guys who make up the band - like Jack Oakie and Frank Jenks - are an awful lot of fun.

 

But - can I say it? - Gene Raymond's beauty wipes them all off the screen.

 

At one point, Lily asks Gene if he wishes that she were a man - and he hesitates - meaningfully.

 

gene_raymond-lily_pons-that_girl_from_pa

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"Night Court" - 1932 -

 

A corrupt judge (Walter Houston) frames a young woman who inadvertently finds out too much about him; her husband (Phillips Holmes) tries his best to get to the bottom of it and blow the whistle on the judge -

 

Phillips Holmes does a great job of bringing us into the darkness of the film and making us want the truth for him, his wife and his baby.

 

for Phillips Holmes, it is a very atypical performance -

 

the film itself could have been made yesterday.

 

517ab734d99e6ebf01f83e3d56f1bf2e.jpg

 

 

"The Bride Walks Out" - (1936) -

 

Gene Raymond and Barbara Stanwyck add style and luster to a romantic trifle that is distinguished by a bizarre kind of dizziness -

 

in the film, Gene Raymond and Barbara Stanwyck get married and she has trouble "budgeting" -

 

a romantic rival arrives in the form of a wealthy playboy, Robert Young -

 

but what kind of a chance does Robert Young have against Gene Raymond?

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During his short lifetime - he died at the age of 35 - Phillips Holmes made 44 films!

 

An-American-Tragedy-1931.jpg

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"Our Mother's House" - Jack Clayton - 1967

 

This one is a terrific film about seven children, who bury their dead mother in the garden, because they do not want to be sent to an orphanage.

 

It has very effective performances from all of the children, the most famous of whom are Pamela Franklin and Mark Lester.

 

It also has a superb performance by Dirk Bogarde as the supposed father of the children.

 

Long-lost, he re-appears when the oldest boy writes to him.

 

The film itself is an intriguing mixture of darkness and light.

 

But the fact that the father does not turn out to be the children's deliverer is quite an unexpected surprise.

 

It deserves a better reputation.

 

186bece97ac2351d46cf4946b689af18.jpg

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The shooting script for "Our Mother's House" was written by Mr. Clayton's third wife, the Israeli-born actress, famous for her role in "Ben Hur", Haya Harareet.

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Jack Clayton - only seven films - but what a body of work -

 

1. "Room At The Top" - 1959

 

2. "The Innocents" - 1961

 

3. "The Pumpkin Eater" - 1964

 

4. "Our Mother's House" - 1967

 

5. "The Great Gatsby" - 1974

 

6. "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - 1983

 

7. "The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearn" - 1987

 

cccfa76df32b634c02657a437eb9be96.jpg

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Jack Clayton - only seven films - but what a body of work -

 

1. "Room At The Top" - 1959

 

2. "The Innocents" - 1961

 

3. "The Pumpkin Eater" - 1964

 

4. "Our Mother's House" - 1967

 

5. "The Great Gatsby" - 1974

 

6. "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - 1983

 

7. "The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearn" - 1987

 

 

 

What a body of work?   Hey, try to be more subtle with gay subtext.    :D  

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What a body of work?   Hey, try to be more subtle with gay subtext.    :D  

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????????????????????

 

Sorry,  silly joke related to the use of body.    I have body on my mind because last night I went to my bro-in-law B-Day party and one of his friends shows up.  This guy has been posting on social media and showing his body since he is taking supplements and going to the gym.

 

Well to most people I have talked to his 'before' much thinner \ trim look is more attractive than his current, buff pumped up look.   He meet people that haven't seen him in years and all of them made comments,  the best one being  'wow,  I could fit the old you into the new you'.    But he took all of these as complements.   

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Contrary to popular opinion, "The Great Gatsby" was a box-office success.

 

It was a very effective realization of the famous novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

 

It also delved into the homoerotic nature of the relationship of Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby.

 

And it, of course, materialized - gradually - the hopelessness of the relationship between Daisy and Jay.

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Contrary to popular opinion, "The Great Gatsby" was a box-office success.

 

It was a very effective realization of the famous novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

 

It also delved into the homoerotic nature of the relationship of Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby.

 

And it, of course, materialized - gradually - the hopelessness of the relationship between Daisy and Jay.

 

Which version are you referring too?   

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Which version are you referring too?   

The Jack Clayton version - with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow.

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Which version are you referring too?   

 

The 1974 version according to Rayban's list (the Robert Redford-Mia Farrow version).  I'd like to see the Alan Ladd version from 1949..

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The 1974 version according to Rayban's list (the Robert Redford-Mia Farrow version).  I'd like to see the Alan Ladd version from 1949..

 

I would also like to see the Ladd version.   I have only seen the Redford version.    

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